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Found 108 results

  1. Recently began having problems with Ubuntu Gnome 16.04 and SimCity4. After an OS update, the game would only run in software mode. I have done a lot of digging trying to find the exact cause, but so far no luck. I have gone back to Ubuntu Gnome 14.04 until this gets fixed.
  2. London - Landmarks

    For the final chapter of London, we're taking a look at some more of the city's most iconic landmarks. We begin with a look back in time to the 1200s - to the Old London Bridge. Constructed in 1209 - this bridge stood for over 600 years as the main route across the River Thames. While long gone, various drawings from the era depict a bustling bridge surrounded by medieval houses on both sides. Unfortunately, the design of the bridge led to its ultimate demise, as it impeded river traffic - and was eventually demolished in the 1800s to make way for a more modern bridge. The next stop is one of London's most awe-inspiring buildings - St. Paul's Cathedral. Designed by famed architect Christopher Wren and opened in 1708, it was part of a major rebuilding program after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The cathedral serves as the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London - and is one of the city's most popular attractions as well. The London Eye is one of the city's most popular attractions - located on the banks of the River Thames, it was the world's largest Ferris wheel when completed in 2000. If you can get past the long lines, the views of the city's South Bank from the top are incredible. We continue on with a trip to one of London's most famous bridges - Tower Bridge. Not to be confused with the original London Bridge (as seen in the first picture, since replaced with more modern versions) - this Victorian Gothic landmark has been one of the city's most distinctive sights since its completion in 1894. Close by Tower Bridge is another one of the city's famous landmarks - the Tower of London. This historic structure was built back in the 1190s and has served as a fortress, palace, and prison. Our next stop is one of the city's most famous squares - Trafalgar Square. Its named after the famed Battle of Trafalgar - a key British naval victory in 1805 - and it's been a popular gathering place for people (and pigeons) since 1840. The iconic Nelson's Column in the middle of the square is one of the city's most famous monuments. Our last stop is one of the world's most iconic buildings - Big Ben. This famous clock tower is located on the north end of the Palace of Westminster and has chimed since 1859. Recent maintenance repairs though means you'll have to wait until 2021 to hear it regularly again. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - The City & The Shard" Big thanks to @matias93, @RobertLM78, @The British Sausage, @Angry Mozart, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @bobolee, @nos.17, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @APSMS, @mike_oxlong, @mattb325, @SC4L0ver, @Mr Saturn64, @Dreadnought, @tonyr, @jakis, @Neto Dari, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Tonraq, @Elenphor, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
  3. London - The City & The Shard

    Our trip to London continues with another look at its incredible skyline. After taking a look at Canary Wharf in the first update, we're taking a look at London's other main financial district - The City of London, also known as The City, along with The Shard today. One of the city's most distinctive skyscrapers is the 591 foot tall 30 St Mary Axe (also referred to as the Gherkin, due its resemblance to a cucumber). Since opening in 2004, it has received many awards for its unique style and ecological footprint. Three of London's tallest buildings (from left to right) - Tower 42 (Completed 1980, 600 feet tall), 99 Bishopsgate (Completed 1976, 341 feet tall), and 122 Leadenhall Street (Completed 2014, 738 feet tall - also known as the cheese grater) Another rainy day in London. A couple various shots of The City. The Shard has become one of London's most recognizable buildings since opening in 2013 - rising 86 floors and 1,016 feet tall, its the tallest building in the United Kingdom and offers breathtaking views from the top. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "London - Canary Wharf" Big thanks to @kschmidt, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @TekindusT, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @huzman, @matias93, @_Michael, @Angry Mozart, @tariely. @tonyr, @The British Sausage, @Talla 2XLC, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @redfox85, @Oerk, @bobolee, @bladeberkman, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @Odainsaker, & @Marushine for all the likes & reactions!
  4. Hello fellas! I am starting this topic because I've got an issue while trying to patch my digital copy of SC4, bought via Origin Games platform. A few years ago I managed to patch my game correctly, but now it seems impossible. My SC4 version is 1.1.610.0, but I can't apply the 1.1.638.0 version I need to start using mods again (I formatted my PC some time ago and I didn't reinstall the game until today). Is there someone who's experienced the same problem?? Please let me know if you found a solution. Thanks!
  5. London - Canary Wharf

    London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It's a city known for its culture, history, and traditions - and is one of the world's most visited cities. Additionally, it's one of the world's greatest commercial, financial, and industrial centers - and is widely known as a truly global city. Over the next three update updates I'll be covering some of the city's most incredible sights and landmarks - starting with Canary Wharf. This major banking district is located on the Isle of Dogs on the banks of the River Thames - and has been home to some of the busiest ports in the world over the years. Today, its best known for its incredible collection of skyscrapers like the 771 ft tall One Canada Square (lower middle below, with the pyramid top), 655 ft tall 8 Canada Square (HSBC Tower, lower left below), and the 655 ft tall 25 Canada Square (middle skyscraper below, citigroup signage) - which are among the tallest in the United Kingdom. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 3/3)" Big thanks to @jakis, @RobertLM78, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @RandyE, @Silur, @Fantozzi, @mike_oxlong, @redfox85, @_Michael, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Odainsaker, @kschmidt, @The British Sausage, @SC4L0ver, @bobolee, @mrsmartman, @raynev1, @scotttbarry, @Elenphor, @Marushine, & @huzman for all the likes!
  6. Is there a mod that reduce the number of residents in medium density buildings? I haven't played SC4 for a long time, but I remember that earlier these 5-floor buildings in my game had fewer residents than now (about 200 as for now). Or it depends just on lots itself, like certain residental lots has less number of occupants?
  7. Prague

    Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic and one of the most picturesque cities in all of Europe. It's a city steeped in history - once the capital of the kingdom of Bohemia, its been a cultural, political, and economic center for centuries. The first stop in our tour is the Petrín Lookout Tower - located at the top of a small hill, this 62m tall Eiffel Tower lookalike offers stunning views of the city. Not too far away is another one of Prague's famous landmarks - St. Vitus Cathedral. Construction took nearly 600 years, finally completing in 1929 - but this magnificent Gothic cathedral was well worth the wait. Countless religious and coronation ceremonies have been held here - making it one of the most important landmarks in the city. To make it into the old town, you'll have to cross the Charles Bridge, spanning the Vlatva River. Completed in 1402, this stunning Gothic styled bridge is one of Prague's most famous landmarks and one of the world's most famous bridges. We've made it into the famed old town. With the incredible Týn Church and Astronomical Clock close by, this stunning town square is steeped in history. The aforementioned Týn Church (fully known as the Church of Our Lady before Týn) is one of the world's most beautiful Gothic churches - built back in the mid 1400s and completed by the mid 1600s, it towers some 260 feet above the surrounding rooftops of Prague. The cathedral also serves as a gallery of Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque works - its a historic site in Prague that anyone visiting here should be sure to visit. Like many other similar cities and towns across Bohemia and Central Europe, Prague enjoys a rich tradition of Christmas markets. Starting in early December and ending by early January, the stalls here have an unbelievable amount of goods on sale - from treats, decorations, handmade goods and more. For those braving the elements - the selection is second to none and its a trip you won't soon forget. No Christmas market is complete though of course without an enormous Christmas tree - and the ones here can get as high as 100 feet tall, making it truly a sight to behold. Once nightfall hits and the snow begins to clear - you can get a clear view of the twinkling lights and all the magic this place has to offer. Another one of Prague's famed traditions is the legendary fireworks display that takes place on New Year's Eve - the entire town gathers in the square and surrounding streets to take in the breathtaking views. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Elenphor, @The British Sausage, @Oerk, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Neto Dari, @TekindusT, & @mrsmartman for all the likes!
  8. Cephalonia (Waterside)

    It's impossible to imagine Greece without the sea - so it's only fitting that we start our tour of Cephalonia with some scenes from the surrounding Ionian Sea. Thousands of years ago, Greek fleets once crossed these waters, engaging in massive wars. While things may be quite a bit different these days - the sea still remains vital. From enjoying a day out in the sun to taking your boat out on a cruise - this is one of the most picturesque locations in the entire Mediterranean. We begin with one of the many campgrounds that overlook the water here. It's difficult to imagine a more beautiful location. Hot air balloons are one of the best ways to view the island - the views from above are simply incredible. For those seeking a thrill - hang gliding is a popular activity throughout the region! While whale spottings are rare in this part of Greece - if you keep your eyes out, you just might get lucky and spot a few. Early mornings on the beach are spectacular. Quieter crowds and beautiful golden sunrises make this a great time to visit. Even in misty weather - the landscapes here are magical. The only concern might be the occasional rain shower.. If hang gliding wasn't enough adventure - you can also try out paragliding. With landscapes this stunning and crowds growing in the summer months - one hot air balloon might not be enough. The steep roads here that overlook the ocean offer some truly incredible views. The surrounding farmland of Cephalonia is just as beautiful - and it's where we'll be headed to next. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia: Introduction" Big thanks to @mike_oxlong, @GoKingsGo, @RobertLM78, @RandyE, @_Michael, @Fantozzi, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @Toby Ferrian, @sucram17, @Elenphor, @matias93, @TMTS, @redfox85, @raynev1, @Marushine, @Odainsaker, @kingofsimcity, @bobolee, @juliok92012, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  9. Welcome to everyone to the first update of my new region. (In the last years I saw a lot of people trying to create a asian/japanese themed cities. I must share my opinion about this. Even if I like the pictures I don't share the ideas or the realism of their regions. I've been working with the Japanese style since the begining of my history in this game and after a lot of years, projects and a long list of regions and cities I think that finally I got a good result, it is at least realistic in terms of realism)
  10. Sydney

    Our trip to Sydney begins with one of the world's most recognizable buildings - the Sydney Opera House. Built in 1973 - its unique white seashell shape truly sets this skyline apart from the rest. Sitting just behind it is the Royal Botanic Gardens - opened in 1816, there's no better place to take a stroll on a sunny day. Just as recognizable is the world famous Sydney Harbour Bridge - built in 1932, it's one of the best ways to cross the harbour. At night, its distinctive lights dominate the surrounding waters. Water taxis are a great way to get around the harbour, and the Circular Quay (whose name contradicts its squarish shape) near the CBD is one of the most popular destinations in the entire city. Sydney is a city known for it's suburbs. In fact, it's got 555 of them - but few are as beautiful as Lavender Bay. It's easily reached by water taxi, has great views of the Harbour Bridge and the skyline in the distance - not to mention being ranked consistently as one of Sydney's most livable suburbs. It's a great place to call home. A rainy day in the CBD. Some of Sydney's most recognizable buildings can be found near Hyde Park - such as the MLC Centre, which held the title as the city's tallest building for 15 years. Nearby is the Sydney Tower - completed in 1981, you can enjoy some exotic cuisine 360 degree rotating restaurant. Another scene from the CBD - some of Sydney's tallest buildings - Deutsche Bank Place, Chifley Tower, Aurora Place, and Governor Philip Tower tower over the Royal Botanic Gardens. However, it's at night that these buildings truly come to life. And finally, some overviews of the city. Special thanks goes out to all the various creators at 3D Warehouse, as many buildings here were imported from there (too many to list). If you're interested, just search "Sydney" there and you'll find many of the same models I used - you'll need to have basic gmax/3dsmax knowledge to get the model into the game however, but it isn't very difficult. The highway system is modular, for an insight of how I created it and the process behind it, please take a look at the comments section of my "City Overview" and "Night Scenes" ST challenge entries. A pic illustrating how I set it up and some of the pieces in game can be seen here. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  11. Tour of Africa: Southern Africa

    The tour of Africa continues on as we visit the rolling hillsides of southern Zimbabwe. For as far as we can see, small villages dot the landscape - and the locals have lived in mud and thatched roof huts like these for thousands of years. Small plots of farmland are seen throughout the countryside - providing the locals just enough for them and their families. As we move west, we venture through a very different kind of landscape: the swampy marshlands of the Okavango Delta. This massive inland delta is unlike any other place on earth - and the wildlife is equally incredible. You can find massive herds of elephants, wildebeest, lions, zebras, and countless other species - so we get on a boat and get as close as we can. Further west is one of Africa's natural wonders - the harsh Namib Desert. You won't find too many settlements here, as the elements are far too inhospitable - but you still might find the occasional mining village, as this region is one of the world's largest diamond exporters. The former diamond mining town of Kolmanskop in southern Namibia had an unfortunate fate - once a rich little village, the entire area was abandoned once larger deposits were found closer to the shoreline. Nature soon took over, and many of the houses here are starting to fill up with sand. While today, the entire city remains a popular tourist attraction - its unknown how long it will last until its completely lost to the Namib. We move back south into South Africa - and we're sure to visit one of the most beautiful destinations in the entire continent - the vineyards of Franschhoek. Centuries old farms complete with Dutch architecture makes this one of the most charming places we visit on our tour - and there's few ways better way to spend a weekend than going out and tasting some of the local wines. Further south is where you'll find the legislative capital of South Africa - Cape Town. With a population of nearly 4 million, this is one of the largest metropolitan areas in all of Africa - and much of the city is surrounded by townships (slums). The locals have to deal with poor housing conditions and poverty - not to mention the polluting factories that dump waste right into the surrounding rivers and streams. The defining feature of Cape Town isn't an office building or any other man made structure - but instead the stunning Table Mountain that serves as one of the world's best backdrops. Its stunning any time of the day - but when the clouds and fog start to roll over the top and into the city, there's few places that are as magical. Travel some 700 miles east along the Drakensberg Mountains and you'll uncover another one of South Africa's incredible natural wonders... Tugela Falls majestically cascades some 2,972 feet down The Amphitheater, a stunning geological feature which contains some of the world's most impressive cliff faces. To get here will require days and days of hiking - but considering its widely regarded as having some of the world's greatest views from the top - its certainly worth it. The world's second tallest waterfall certainly doesn't disappoint - and it serves as the perfect end to our tour of Southern Africa. (No photoshop used - the cliffs are a custom mod of mine which can be found here. The .gif is 12MB - might take a bit to load) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Johannesburg" Big thanks to @NielsC007, @TMTS, @sucram17, @Akallan, @BC Canuck, @Elenphor, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @mattb325, @kschmidt, @Tonraq, @GoKingsGo, @Marushine, @kingofsimcity, @Namiko, @weixc812, @Toby Ferrian, @TekindusT, @Fantozzi, @raynev1, @nRVOUS, @bobolee, @RandyE, @Fargo, @Yarahi, @Jonas_Chaves, @Manuel-ito, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, @CorinaMarie, @RobertLM78, & @_Michael for all the likes!
  12. My tram cars have disappeared on only one of my tram loops. They were there for several days, but they vanished yesterday and have not come back. The query tool shows them as operational with the same amount of traffic as before. I have not added or subtracted any mods or content. Obviously, I have the NAM installed and I am using the TTC_Tram mod and the European Bus and Tram Stops mod. As I said, it is only affecting one of two tram loops. The picture below shows the affected area.
  13. Tour of Africa: Introduction

    So for my next series of updates, I have something a little special planned. Over the last couple months, I've been slowly accumulating a large collection of African scenes - and it's finally starting to come together. With nearly 40 different scenes (the pics below are just a small little teaser of what's to come - the tip of the iceberg ), it's going to be like nothing I've ever done before - an unforgettable tour of just about everything the continent has to offer. We'll start off the six-part series by taking a look at one of Africa's most iconic cities - Johannesburg. From there, we'll stay in Southern Africa, exploring a variety of natural scenes - including one of Africa's most famous wildlife sanctuaries, the Okavango Delta. Along with the world's second tallest waterfall - Tugela Falls. Animations are going to play a pivotal role in this series - it's going to be quite the sight From there, we'll head east - getting to visit East Africa and the beautiful Indian Ocean along the way. With a number of unique wonders like the Tsingy stone forests - visiting Madagascar is also must. It's off to Central Africa from there - where we'll get to explore wild Africa at its finest along with a number of natural wonders. Algae-rich lakes such as Lake Logipi attract countless lesser flamingos - and when they migrate, it makes for one of the greatest sights on the continent. We'll then head out to West Africa - visiting a number of small rural scenes, like the ones found in Rural Congo. And we'll wrap up in North Africa - after traveling through the Sahara, we'll get to see one of the continents greatest landmarks, the Pyramids. Additionally, as you might expect - there hasn't been a great deal of African themed custom content to work with. Because of this, custom content creation has been absolutely vital to this series. I've been creating various BATs from scratch on a massive scale to make some of these scenes possible: WIP: If anyone's interested in some of the stuff I'll be using over the next couple of updates, feel free to PM me. I don't know yet though how long it will take me to upload some of this stuff, there's still lots of various odds and ends that I need to sort out and I've been extremely busy with my CJ/MD as of late. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Bohemia" @Jeffrey500 Thanks! Bohemia is certainly one of my dream destinations Might be a while though before I find the time to upload this stuff so feel free to PM me if you're interested in anything. @mike_oxlong Thanks I've been slowly accumulating a whole bunch of pics really since the beginning of the year and I'm finally finding the time to put them all into proper updates. @dabadon5 Thank you for the comment! @Simmer2 @_Michael Thanks for the kind words! @JP Schriefer Thanks for the comment! @tariely Thanks! I had to do a lot of fiddling around in 3dsmax to make sure the models were just perfect, glad you liked it @raynev1 Thanks raynev! @Akallan Thank you! When I first saw that village I knew I wanted to do the update. It's so magical! @RandyE Thanks for the comment! I was thinking the same exact same thing when I was working on those. I actually got started on a Yosemite update a real long time ago (late May of last year I think? Never made much progress on it though.) and whipped up a really fancy national park themed banner like the ones you mentioned. Perhaps I'll have to give a couple US national parks another go in the future @TekindusT Thank you! @jmsepe Thanks for the nice words! @kschmidt Thanks for the comment! Those houses were actually just released on the LEX, check them out here @Namiko Thank you, glad you liked the animation I've been trying to work more of those in to my updates here recently. And big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Jeffrey500, @mike_oxlong, @Tyberius06, @Simmer2, @matias93, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, @CorinaMarie, @_Michael, @RandyE, @JP Schriefer, @SC4L0ver, @Marushine, @huzman, @Manuel-ito, @raynev1, @Akallan, @nos.17, @MushyMushy, @mrsmartman, @AlexSLM520, @Silur, @kschmidt, @juliok92012, @Elenphor, @Yarahi, & @Namiko for all the likes!
  14. Scenes From South America

    Our journey to South America begins in Baños, Ecuador - located in the Eastern Andes, this popular tourist resort town offers lots to do. From restaurants, hot springs, waterfalls, and plenty of other activities to keep you occupied - its an excellent destination for anyone wanting to get a taste of the region. We won't be staying here long though, as the neighboring Amazon awaits.. While Baños may be located in the Andes Mountains - it's also known as the "Gateway to the Amazon" due to its close proximity to many of the Amazon River's tributaries and streams, offering a direct route into the jungle itself. We rent a boat from one of the locals, and we're soon on our way - into the dense, humid climate of the Amazon rainforest.. We travel deeper into the Amazon, and it might be hundreds of miles before we reach the next town or village. The locals here live simple lives - while some are tucked away so deep into the forest that they haven't been reached yet by civilization - others live on the shores of the Amazon and its tributaries with limited contact. We get a chance to meet a group of them, high up on their stilt houses - the brief glimpse into their lives and customary rituals is quite fascinating. In this part of South America - much of the local economy depends on important natural resources such as oil to keep afloat. Lake Maracaibo, located in northern Venezuela, has been vital for the locals - outside of the Middle East, this is one of the world's largest oil producers since oil was first discovered here back in 1914. Much of the land surrounding the lake is surrounded by endless fields of oil pumpjacks - they've quickly become a common symbol of the region. We head back into Brazil and the next stop will be a common sight in many of the major cities. From São Paulo to Rio de Janeiro - favelas dot the outskirts and creep up along the mountainous hillsides. The people here might not have a lot - but they make the best of their situation for them and their families, creating makeshift houses from whatever they can find. Some 1,000 miles west is where you'll find our next destination - one of South America's greatest cities, Buenos Aires. The mighty obelisco rises some 221 feet above the surrounding Plaza de la República and the spaciously wide 9 de Julio Avenue - commemorating the founding of the city back in 1536, its one of the main landmarks in the city and one of its premier destinations. Our final destination takes us back to the Andes - and although much of the land here is inhospitable and harsh, there's still a number of small, charming villages and towns that you'll want to check out. The small village of Tocanao in Chile stands on the edge of the Atacama Desert - despite the lack of rain (this is the driest area on the face of the planet) - the people here have adapted quite well, making the most of a few small streams that run close by. The bell tower here dates from 1750 - built from volcanic stone, its a unique landmark that's quite striking. Note: For this update (and others) - custom content creation has been vital. I've been creating custom road texture sets (this is only a small portion of it - there's about 20 or so for the Banos pic), BATing various small buildings from scratch (1, 2,), making HD water textures, and much more. I don't know if any of this stuff will make it to the exchange soon as there isn't any documentation, a number of small things still need to be fixed/improved, and I've also been extremely busy with my CJ lately. In the meantime though, if anyone is interested in these then just send me a PM. Additionally, about the last update - the obscure BATs were not photoshopped in (that would be waay too much photoshop in my book) - they're all ingame BATs I got from 3d warehouse. The Petra pic used a bit more photoshop than usual - I made it a long time ago when I was still messing around with PS - but the pic still uses an ingame BAT from 3d warehouse with some extra effects around it (added lights, made the cliffs look better.) Anyways, if I'm doing a scene and I need something from 3d warehouse, I'll import it into 3dsmax, render it, and use it as a prop in my scene. They are like any other BAT you would use. I already wrote a number of moderately in-depth guides on this in my other "South America" update here - I might consider doing this again (more in depth) if there's enough interest. Also, all of my scenes with the crazy road textures are really just a big flat prop (ingame props, not some sort of crazy photoshop effect. That would be an excessive amount of photoshop in my book). I'll make a big texture, place it on the prop in 3dsmax, render it, and use that prop in Lot Editor. So it isn't some sort of post processing effect, these are ingame props, no different than any other prop you would use. I already made a guide on this here in my "Year in Review" entry (the Pisa picture) so feel free to check it out. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: Ancient Ruins - Pt. II Big thanks hanks to @Fantozzi, @kingofsimcity, @RandyE, @_Michael, @MushyMushy, @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Yarahi, @mrsmartman, @mike_oxlong, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @tariely, @raynev1, @Dgmc2013, @GoKingsGo, @Ducio, @Namiko, @Akallan, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @Bastet69008, @schokoladeneis 1, @mattb325, @Elenphor, @Krasner, @juliok92012, @JP Schriefer, @Don_Pato, & @sucram17 for all the likes!
  15. Ancient Ruins - Pt. II

    For the second part of our tour, we begin by traveling to the Middle East to take a look at one of the world's most unique set of ruins - Petra. Founded by the Nabataean civilization as early as 312 BCE, this ancient sandstone city flourished for centuries - and the construction of the Treasury in the 1st century CE was a time of considerable growth and prosperity for the civilization. By 106 CE the Roman Empire captured the city - while Roman influence can be seen throughout the complex, they still thrived as a trade center for many more centuries. Eventually though, the Romans moved their trade capital from Petra and the entire city faded into obscurity and was abandoned shortly afterwards. The ruins have remained a mysterious landmark since then - in fact, the whole facade of the Treasury is riddled with bullet holes after Bedouin tribesmen tried to break in, hoping to recover riches inside. To this day, the entire complex remains a popular tourist attraction in the area - be sure to visit at night when the entire complex is lit up by a stunning display of candles - its one of the most magical experiences imaginable. For our next iconic ancient ruin - we're traveling to the rural farmlands of southern England. Stonehenge was built between 3200 and 2000 BCE - making it by far the oldest ruin on our list. The druids who built this megalith used ingenious methods to move these rocks around - and although its not entirely agreed upon, most believe that some sort of earth ramp was used to lift the stones into perfect position. There's no better time to visit here than during midsummer sunrise - the stones themselves align to it perfectly, making it a magical experience that's one of a kind. We'll be taking an extended look at the Roman Empire next - and there's no better place to start than the famous Roman Forum in the heart of Rome. This impressive set of ruins was once the heart of the city, with the likes of Julius Caesar and other important Roman leaders once crossing these grounds. After several sacks of Rome though that led to the fall of the empire during the 400s CE, many of the rocks and stones were plundered extensively, leaving the entire complex a shell of its former self. Excavations and restorations began in the 18th century - and although much of the original structure is long gone, you can still get a glimpse of what these walls once held. Our next stop within the ancient Roman Empire is the famous Colosseum. First opening back in 80 CE, its size couldn't be rivaled - more than 50,000 people could watch the many events that were held here. Aside from the gladiator fights - the Colosseum was used for just about everything and remained an important site in the empire for hundreds of years. While much of the structure has been lost to time or plundered by enemies - there's still much of it remaining, making it one of the most popular attractions not just in Italy - but also the world. Our final archeological site is none other than the famous ruins of Pompeii, Italy. This ancient Roman city was founded between the 6th and 7th century - and continued to grow and flourish as an important trading center for centuries. However, in 79 CE, nearby Mount Vesuvius exploded - covering the entire city under a blanket of ash and pyroclastic materials. Although most of the town's inhabitants survived (nearly 80% evacuated before the eruption) - an estimated 2,000 people still lost their lives on that fateful day. After a series of excavations starting in the 1700s, the entire city has became a massive tourist attraction and one of the world's premier archeological sites. NOTE: Pretty much all the models in this update were downloaded and imported into the game from sites like 3d warehouse, as there were no close replacements for certain buildings I needed. These are ingame models imported into the game with 3dsmax, they are like any other BAT you would use. Besides the Petra picture where I added the lights and made the cliffs look a bit better - there was very little photoshop used at all. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Rest of replies for "Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview)" @tariely Thanks for the kind words Yeah, I'd agree with you there, I could have probably added a couple more cars (I really wish there were more FA car props out there though). But, let's just say it's an early morning in Rome for now @mike_oxlong Thanks! Surprisingly my plugins folders aren't that big, but that's mainly because I have about 8 of them by now and I just swap them out constantly. Even if I could share my Plugins folders (I don't know if the admins would be down with that.. ).. you'd probably spend more time trying to navigate through my messy menus than actually playing the game @JP Schriefer Thanks! Glad you liked it. Petra has to be one of my personal faves so far And finally, big thanks to @scotttbarry, @AlexSLM520, @GoKingsGo, @Simmer2, @mrsmartman, @Akallan, @Odainsaker, @RandyE, @bobolee, @JP Schriefer, @tariely, @tonyr, @Manuel-ito, @_Michael, @Jolteon, @raynev1, @Fantozzi, & @kingofsimcity for all the likes!
  16. Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    Located in the middle of the Great Rift Valley, Lake Bogoria is home to one of the world's largest populations of lesser flamingos - every year millions of them migrate to it's algae infested waters. The lake boasts some of the most impressive wildlife in all of Africa - hundreds of species of birds call the lake home, and you might even see a couple zebras if you look hard enough. Geysers and hot springs dot the shoreline, creating a truly unforgettable landscape. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  17. Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview)

    Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview) Our tour of the ancient world continues on.. after taking a look at a number of famous ruins from Central & South America in the first update, we're continuing on into Europe & Asia in Part II. I'm putting the finishing touches on a few more Roman ruin scenes so I hope to get the full update out soon... but here's a little bit of what I've done thus far: The Colosseum Petra by Night Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Ancient Ruins" @_Michael Thanks for the comment! I have a lot in store, hope to get it out soon. @TekindusT Thanks! That scene and model was a real pain to make, but I think it turned out quite nicely @kingofsimcity Thanks, glad you enjoyed it! I still have a trip or two left to "AncientSimCity" after this update.. so stay tuned @juliok92012 Thank you! @younghappy Thank you That sounds like quite the incredible trip I imagine! I didn't think that anyone would have been there before - that's pretty cool. Always neat to hear that it measures up to the real thing Thanks again to @Golhbul, @Akallan, @mike_oxlong, @Bastet69008, @aegian, @Simmer2, & @JP Schriefer for all the supportive comments! And finally, big thanks to @Golhbul, @kingofsimcity, @Manuel-ito, @Akallan, @scotttbarry, @tonyr, @raynev1, @RandyE, @Jolteon, @Fantozzi, @_Michael, @juliok92012, @mrsmartman, @mike_oxlong, @nRVOUS, @Jonas_Chaves, @Bastet69008, @aegian, @Marushine, @Oerk, @Elenphor, @Yarahi, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, @sucram17, @TMTS, @SC4L0ver, & @PHBSD for all the likes!
  18. Patagonia

    Our journey to Patagonia starts off in the countryside. Sheep farming is common across much of southern South America and the Falklands - introduced to the region in the late 1800s, the constant demand of sheep wool and meat ever since has kept this a vital economic activity. With the sheep population outnumbering humans 10 to 1 - you're bound to see them wherever you go. Our next stop is Ushuaia, Argentina - the southernmost town in the world. Abandoned and wrecked ships dot the harbour, such as St. Christopher - a reminder of how unpredictable the waters of the Beagle Channel can be. With dreary, foggy days being the norm here - these boats seem to fit right in. Ushuaia is located on the Tierra del Fuego (Land of Fire) archipelago - a name that comes from Spanish explorers observing the local Yaghan people's tradition of constantly keeping a fire stoked to deal with the chilly weather. In autumn however, the landscape itself turns into a "land of fire", coming alive with a beautiful display of red, orange, and yellow foliage. With much of the year being best described as bleak - it's a dramatic change that's quite stunning. In Patagonia, much of the land consists of barren plateaus and grasslands - one of the few ways to get around is by taking the Pan-American Highway, the world's longest motorable road. While much of the surrounding landscape is rather plain, there always seems to be something interesting if you look hard enough - and in this case, don't be surprised if you see a couple of llamas grazing the lands. Patagonia is dotted with countless rivers, creating great canyons as they slowly carve away the landscape. The Rio Pinturas Canyon of Argentina is perhaps the best example in all of Patagonia - it's just as dramatic as it is beautiful. Another destination you'll want to be sure to visit is the Cueva de las Manos (Cave of the Hands), tucked away in the surrounding granite cliffs - few places in South America and even the world can compare to its collection of ancient rock paintings. Our last stop might be the most spectacular of them all. Rising nearly 10,000 feet above the surrounding Patagonian landscape in relative isolation, the mountains of Chile's Torres del Paine will take your breath away. Catching a good view of them is quite difficult, with heavy clouds often covering the peaks and violent storms frequently battering the area. It only seems fitting however - this is truly one of the most untamed places on Earth and a can't miss destination of Patagonia. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Central Asia"
  19. Český Krumlov

    Today we take a tour through one of Europe's most charming cities - Český Krumlov, located in the Bohemia region of the Czech Republic. We begin in Svornosti Square - the town square located in the heart of the city. Its been here since medieval times - and today its lined by a number of old shops and antique stores. The Český Krumlov State Castle is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city. Built on top of a steep cliff on the banks of the Vlatva River, the views from here are great - especially during sunsets. Its one of the most marvelous sights in the entire region - built back in the 13th century, today it houses a museum with exhibitions running frequently. Nighttime is often quiet here - making it a good time to get away from the crowds. The Virgin Mary statue located in the middle of the old square is one of the best sights at night - its hard to miss. Christmas markets are a time tested tradition in central European towns and cities - and the one hosted yearly in the town square is quite the popular attraction. With its towering Christmas tree, countless stalls, and falling snow - it truly makes for a magical atmosphere. The Vlatva River snakes and loops around the city, adding to the charm of the old town. Restaurants and shops are located along its banks, making for a picturesque experience - especially during the colors of fall. One of the most amazing times to visit Český Krumlov is during autumn - the fall foliage, crisp weather, and smaller crowds all make it a perfect time to visit the city. The atmosphere coupled with the historic buildings of the old town makes it a fairytale experience! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Patagonia"
  20. Scenes From Africa

    Our trip to Africa starts off in Lagos, Africa's largest city. Getting anywhere around town seems to be an impossible task with the never ending flow of traffic. Street vendors and hawkers are on every street corner, and the massive crowds of people everywhere adds to the congestion. In order to go anywhere, using the bright yellow danfos (buses) are almost a necessity - they're virtually everywhere in the city. But just when we thought the traffic was bad enough around our hotel - one of the local markets spills out onto the streets. This in turn forces one of the main roads to shut down and everything comes to a complete standstill for a couple of days. We're limited to touring the city by foot at this point, but at least we get to check out many of the beautiful goods that the local markets have to offer. After our stay in Lagos, we start traveling East - right into the heart of Congo. All the roads from this point forward are dirt covered - which potentially makes rainy season a real headache. Fortunately for us, we don't run into any problems for the time being. Along our way, we get to meet numerous tribes, observing their rituals and getting a chance to see how the locals live. The mud and thatched roof huts they call home have been a mainstay for thousands of years - and we can see why, noting their sturdiness and ease of build. Our next stop in our African journey is northern Tanzania where we take our Jeep through Serengeti National Park. The views from the ground are amazing, almost immediately spotting large herds of elephants, giraffes, and zebras. However, to get an even better view, we decide to board a hot air balloon instead. It's wildebeest migration season, and we get an excellent birds-eye view from our balloon - also finally spotting a couple of lions on the prowl as well. Once we get back on the ground, we finally start to make our way out of the park - but not before stopping a few times to let a herd of Giraffes make their way across the road. We board our plane and arrive next in Madagascar, being sure to see it's famous Avenue of the Baobabs. Not only are they perhaps the world's fattest tree, but they also can live for 2,000 years or more - they're truly marvelous as they tower high above us. However, just as we make our way out of the area, we're met with an unexpected surprise. We thought we left the traffic back in Lagos - but evidently we were quite wrong, getting stuck in a cattle traffic jam on numerous occasions. Once we make it back to the mainland, we travel a couple hundred miles West and make our way across the Zimbabwean border. After getting lost more than a couple times and finally getting some much needed help from the locals, we're able to locate Great Zimbabwe, nestled in the middle of the Zimbabwean foothills. Once the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe, all that's left is a collection of ruins scattered around central and western Africa. Despite their current state, you can still get a sense of the power and greatness that these walls once held. Our final destination is perhaps Africa's most famous - Victoria Falls. One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, these awe-inspiring falls truly live up to the title. Once we get there, we're sure to try out a little whitewater river rafting - it's the middle of the high season and the river is in full force. However, there's still something that's a little more dangerous that we have to try out. Our tour guide takes us back up to the top of the falls, and we board a small boat to Livingstone Island near the middle of the Zambezi river. We slowly move our way across the lip of the falls, careful not to take one wrong step on any slippery rocks along our way. Finally, we reach our destination - the infamous Devil's pool. We take the plunge, and the only thing protecting us from a 300+ foot drop is a small submerged rock barrier on the edge. We take a deep breath, carefully leaning over the edge to catch the view of a lifetime. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! Thanks -korver
  21. !! Update 05 Aug !! - READ HERE FIRST It seems that CD versions of SC4 will not run under Windows 10 - The necessary OS support files for validating SafeDisc2 copy protection simply isn't part of Windows 10. This issue is not unique to SC4 either, SafeDisc and associated technologies were widely used by game discs for such validation. For now, unless MS decide to retroactively support it, your only option appears to be a digital version of the game which will not have such copy protection. If you put your CD-Key into Origin they will provide you with a free digital copy of the game, so it needn’t cost you any money to resolve. This thread is aimed at users who cannot run SC4 using Windows 10, if your games starts but has other issues, this is not the place to go into that. The only way to try and understand why certain users can not get the game to work, and hopefully, find a solution, is to start gathering some data. -Note- I've removed the superfluous information from this thread, to avoid confusion. But in-short the summary above explains the issue here.
  22. Myrtos Beach

    Located on the island of Cephalonia in the Ionian Sea, few beaches across the globe can compare to Greece's breathtaking Myrtos Beach. Due to it's remote and rugged location, the beach is completely inaccessible by foot - the only way to reach it is to traverse your way down a series of steep hairpin curves. Once you make it there however, you'll be rewarded greatly with pristine, warm Mediterranean waters, perfectly soft white sand, and of course, incredible views. Our journey gets started off with us making accommodations at a timeless Greek villa - our room overlooks the edge of the beach, giving us a fantastic view of the sunset. We'll be staying here tonight, and tomorrow we're off to the beach. We set off for the beach early in the morning, driving through endless fields of daisies and poppies along our way. However, just as we roll down our windows to take in the smell, the clouds darken and it starts pouring. It looks like our day at the beach could very well be in jeopardy. Fortunately for us however, it was nothing more than a quick rain shower. The sky eventually begins to clear up and the beach starts to come alive with tourists. We stake out a prime spot on the beachfront and soak up the sun - no better way to spend an afternoon! Myrtos Beach is more than just a beach - it's an experience. Activities such as hang gliding are extremely popular throughout the area, so we throw caution to the wind and decide to give it a shot. We make our way back to the beach just as the day begins to wind down. Once nightfall approaches, we get a little peace and quiet once the beach starts emptying out - being sure to take it all in one last time. A perfect end to our day. I hope you enjoyed your visit to Myrtos Beach! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  23. South America + Bonus Pictures

    After visiting the world's tallest waterfall and largest rain forest, our small Cessna finally lands at our next destination. We've got quite the trip planned, so enjoy Our first stop in our journey is the capital and largest city of Suriname, Paramaribo. It's truly a one of a kind city, with its mixture of beautiful colonial Dutch architecture on the edge of the rain forest. The Dutch architecture serves as a reminder to the past - the country was under Dutch rule for nearly 150 years as Dutch Guiana until it gained its independence back in 1975. Our time in Paramaribo is brief - and unfortunately, the rain never seems to stop during our stay, as is common in much of the country. We board our plane once again and head back out. Cloaked in heavy rain clouds, Mount Roraima on the Brazil/Venezuela/Guyana border is truly breathtaking with its imposing sheer cliffs. Countless waterfalls plunge off of its tiered slopes - yet another sign that we're in the middle of rainy season. We land our plane just inside the Amazonas state of Eastern Venezuela for a quick excursion. We're up for a challenge, and the imposing Autana Tepui provides just that. After a couple of days of nerve wracking climbing, we finally reach the top and put up our tents for the night, taking in the view. We get back on our plane and land a couple hundred miles north in Valencia. We'll be traveling by car for now on, and the first stop is the small town of Puerto Colombia on the southern coast of the Caribbean Sea. It's a charming little village, with its small river filled with brightly colored riverboats. No trip here would be complete without taking one for a cruise through the village, and we do just that. After driving along the Caribbean coast for a couple hundred more miles, we finally make our way to the Pan-American highway. Taking that south, we travel high through the Andes mountains of Colombia for quite some time until we finally reach Colombia's Cocora Valley. This place seems almost unreal, with it's famed wax palm trees climbing to heights of up to 200 feet tall. The surrounding landscape is equally impressive, with quaint farming villages surrounded by rolling hillsides and steep, rocky slopes. The locals are quite hospitable, letting us stay the night. Not too far from the Cocora Valley is another one of Colombia's famous attractions, the Las Lajas Sanctuary. Built between 1916 and 1949, this church is one of the most impressive sights in all of South America, standing high above the steep Guáitara River canyon. Between the location, waterfalls, and reports to this day of "mysterious healing" - it's truly a magical place. After driving for seemingly an eternity through nothing but the barren deserts of Central and Southern Peru, we eventually reach a sight worth looking for. There's one landmark here that you'll want to keep your eye out for - they're easy to miss. Eventually we find one of the legendary Nazca lines - the condor. Created between 500 B.C. and A.D. 500, the Nazca culture created these lines by removing the rocks from the desert floor, revealing the lighter colored ground beneath. The best way to view these lines is by air however, so we catch a quick ride and do just that. After checking out the famed Nazca lines, we start to head our way inland towards Cuzco and finally make our way towards the legendary Machu Picchu. There's no more roads from this point forward - the only way to the top is by foot. After stopping at a local village, we get out our backpacking gear and get ready for the adventure ahead of us. It's quite the climb up the mountain, but after numerous days and nights traversing through dense rain forest, finally seeing these majestic ruins makes it all worth it. We get back on the highway and start heading south once more. The landscape initially is barren - but eventually it turns into something much more beautiful. The steep slopes of the Andes mountains have been terraced by local farmers for thousands of years, and there's no better example of their work than the Colca Canyon. Through advanced irrigation strategies they transformed these steep mountainsides into workable farmland, and to this day the locals make their living off them. Our trip through the Andes slowly gets higher and higher in elevation as we start heading eastwards. Eventually it becomes hard to just catch out breath, but we soon adapt to the massive height difference. Perched in the middle of these mountains is the world's highest lake, Lake Titicaca, a sight that we wouldn't want to miss. One of the most remarkable sights here is the floating islands of the local Uros people. By taking the tough reeds that surround the lake (totora) - they've managed to build floating islands that entire families can live on. They allow us to have a glimpse into their daily lives, allowing us onto one of their island and to observe some of their ancient traditions. We're finally out of the mountains, but the adventure as just begun for us. This swampy, densely forested area of Brazil is known as The Pantanal - and there's only one way through it, the transpantaneira. The road acts as the only safe route through the wetlands, and we run into numerous herds of cattle on the road along the way. It doesn't take long for us to get into our first standoff - as a couple of crocodile-resembling caimans need to make their way across the road. We finally reach the capital of Brazil, Brasília. Seeking a more centrally located capital, in 1960 the capital was changed from Rio de Janeiro to Brasília and an entire city was planned and built from the ground up. Architect Oscar Niemeyer designed many of the important buildings here, giving them a distinctive flair. There's no better example than the Palácio do Planalto - the official workplace of the President of Brazil truly comes alive at night. From Brasília, we start traveling eastwards towards the Brazilian coastline. Every Brazilian beach side city is magnificent, but Rio stands out from the rest. Standing atop of Corcovado Mountain is the famous Cristo Redentor statue - a must visit for any tourist, especially at sunrise. Completed in 1931, its arms were placed in an open stance, symbolizing peace. A couple hundred miles west is another Brazilian beach side city that you don't want to miss, Santos - one of the most beautiful cities that we encounter during our journey. It's gardens (the world's longest) and beaches are truly magnificent, stretching for as far as the eye can see. After all the traveling we've done thus far - some time spent relaxing on the beach is more than overdue. When traveling through Brazil, you're bound to run into a number of favelas (slums) on the outskirts of many of the larger cities. We saw a number of them in Rio de Janeiro - and as we travel through São Paulo, we see quite a few more. The people here make the most of their situation, gathering whatever they can find in order to create a house for their families. We begin the final leg of our journey with the mighty Itaipu Dam, located on the Paraná River on the Paraguay/Brazil border. You truly can't underestimate the size of this massive structure - it's the largest hydroelectric scheme in the world. This dam alone provides nearly 80% of Paraguay's electricity, as well as much of the power to many important cities in Brazil - but it did come at a steep $20 billion cost. It's the rainy season - so we get to see an up close view of the spillway in action, which drains out any excess water from the Itaipu reservoir. Our next stop is some 20 miles south - the world famous Iguazu Falls. From miles around you can hear them rumbling - you can just sense the power of these falls. There's a seemingly infinite amount of waterfalls here, and the best way to experience them is to get up close. One way is to board one of the many boats that travel along the lower river - and we do just that, getting as close to the falls as possible. But no trip is complete without visiting the "Devil's Throat" (seen in the top left corner of the picture) - an elevated walkway takes us as close as we can possibly get to it, witnessing a one of a kind wonder. - Full size link here - Finally, our journey wraps up when we reach one of the premier destinations in South America - Buenos Aires. Once you see the avenues and architecture, it's not hard to see why it's called the "Paris of South America". 9 de Julio isn't just wide - it's the world's largest avenue - and right in the middle of it is the famous Obelisco de Buenos Aires. Built to commemorate the founding of the city in 1536, it's truly amazing at night. - Bonus Pictures - Everything else that didn't make it into an update this year, so here's their final destination. Enjoy! Yaounde, Cameroon Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania Agbokim Waterfalls, Nigeria Ancient City of Djado (1000 A.D.), Niger Rubber Farm, Liberia Mother and Child Balancing Rocks, Matobo National Park, Zimbabwe Great Blue Hole, Belize Sutherland Falls, New Zealand Great Wall of China Prague's Christmas Market New Year's Eve in Prague - Tutorials - Itaipu Dam Itaipu Dam was one of the more difficult projects I did, and after many trials and tribulations I was able to successfully get it into the game. To make it, I first downloaded the pieces from here, here, and here. After I brought it into 3dsmax, the next objective was to break it up into small pieces so it would render properly. This picture illustrated what exactly I ended up doing. Next, the pieces had to be edited with the Reader to make their occupant sizes 1x1x1, so other things such as MMPs could be plopped around them, and most importantly so they would fit onto 1x1 tiles. Then, all the pieces were put onto 1x1 tiles, and moved around countless times to ensure they would line up as close as the game would possibly allow. Finally, it was a matter of placing everything in the game and plopping water and MMPs around the entire dam structure. Some minor editing was done after the fact, such as to add extra steam on the spillway in addition to the plopped JENX small + medium waterfall lots, to add power lines between the plopped power poles, and to clean up any small imperfections between pieces. Machu Picchu Now, I'll probably get some questions on my Machu Picchu so I'll try my best to explain my method here as well. I've struggled with terraces in the past (that's why you haven't seen any so far ), but now with this method, you'll probably see things like terraced rice paddies in the future as well. So pretty much what I did was firstly download a couple of Machu Picchu models I found off of 3d warehouse. They're actually pretty easy to make though, so I'd recommend that if you can do it. I took the good elements of each, moved things around, rescaled, rotated etc and combined them to make a really nice model. Retextured it, then converted it to an editable poly, selected faces, and carefully selected and removed all the flat grass faces on the model. Cut out a section of it, rendered it, made the LODs 1x1x1 in reader, and placed it on a 1x1 lot. Opened up Model tweaker, then offset it something like 500 ft so now it's hanging way off the lot and the 1x1 lot won't interfere when I'm terraforming. Once in game, I plop it, terraform hills to the contour of the terraces, and put down lots of MMP grass where the grass used to be on the model. This picture should help illustrate that a bit (taken right at the beginning, so terraforming/MMPing wasn't done, but hopefully you should get the idea). Finally, the last adjustments were made in PS, the biggest of which included adding shadows (which is important here because models won't cast shadows on MMPs) Base Textures A couple of the city streets were MMPed, but the rest were not - and they're not actually traditional "base textures", like the ones you would expect to find in lot editor. Instead, I'll prepare a large, highly customized texture for each city scene I'm working on based on a number of pictures. Once it's done, it's placed on a big flat plane in 3dsmax and rendered, ready to be placed in game. It takes way longer than simply using modular road sets (usually a day or two) - but the increased realism is worth it, and I'll probably be using it fully moving forward. - - - Special thanks once again to all the various creators on 3d warehouse for providing invaluable models for this update. Attribution for the pictures: Waterkant Paramaribo, CCSA3, Forrestjunky | Tepuy Autana (Kuaymayojo), CCSA3, Fernando Flores | View from Mt. Roraima "Window", CCSA2, Paulo Fassina | puerto colombia (choroní, venezuela), CC2, Olga Berrios | Ceroxylon Quindiuense Cocora, CC3, Diegotorquemada | Santuario Nacional de Las Lajas 02, CCSA3, GameOfLight | Colca Canton Puno, CCSA2, world-wide-gifts.com | Machu Picchu, Peru, Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike2.0, Pedro Szekely | Nazca Lines - Condor, CCSA2, Paul Williams | Uros Islands in Lake Titicaca - panoramio, CC3, Frans-Banja Mulder | Por do Sol Pantanal em Mato Grosso Brasil, CCSA3, Filipefrazao | Yellow Jesus, CCSA3, dabldy | Panoramica Santos, CC2, Diego Silvestre | Sao Paulo, Brasil, CC2, Francisco Autunes | Usina Hidroelétrica Itaipu Binacional / Itaipu Dam, CC2, Deni Williams | Iguazu National Park Falls, CC3, Tomfriedel | Obelisk Buenos Aires, CC2, Nestor Galina. Notes: Various edits were made to each picture, including color, slight blurring, and sharpening. All these banners have the same license as the original pictures. - - - Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  24. Andia

    Version 1.0.0

    232 Downloads

    This was made by 'and, so it's called Andia. Lots of flat place for building, which is nice if you use roadtop mass transit of any sort. Features both coasts and mountains. A greyscale image, region.ini, and config file are included. Use the config, or make your own to suit. To install press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+R, browse to and select the greyscale image, then go do some chores while the game renders the map.
  25. Welcome back to Petal, today we are exploring to the major shopping area, west of the roundabout full of some of the best shopping in the area. Home of some of the large box stores, grocery stores, and restaurants , such as Walmart, Kohl's, Target, Winn-Dixie, Starbucks, and more! So let's hop in our cars, and drive to the latest place to shop in the Parish! As we start off; we start at the roundabout, where we will take the western way to the shopping, and more! Starting with a Winn-Dixie, Best Buy, and a McDonald's, the Winn-Dixie gives this town the southern feel that we preserve; and with the low, low prices; Keep the people happy with the freshest produce and meat, while across the street you can go buy that new computer to play Simcity 4! Going a bit more west, you come to the only Holiday Inn in the city; the original Holiday Inn was torn down in 1993 to build this; and the original was built in the 1960s with one of those big Great Signs of Holiday Inn, now it's a modern lodging area to provide all with comfortable lodging, and attempt to compete against the hotels in downtown like Holiday Park, and the other hotels on this part of the avenue. As well, is a simple Chevrolet dealership, with new cars and great service; the Petal Chevrolet dealership which has been in business since 1928, will service you till your happy! Like any other city, Walmart's store here is always packed, and with everything you need in a modern Walmart; that replaced the original one in 2015, it as well features Subway inside for a perfect stop for a sub, while shopping for your groceries, clothes, or anything really! Of course, there is non-shopping to; we have a Chuck E Cheese's and a Starbucks near the Holiday Inn, with a Rite Aid pharmacy, all in one intersection! There also, is a old Motorola office building for Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, and the Alabama region to provide quick customer service and offices for those in the company or buying their products. Don't like Walmart? There is a Kohl's near the Days Inn and the Hampton Inn, to get you your discount clothing. Or if you want to go to the end of the shopping experience, is a Sam's Club, Lowe's or a Target. Notice the farms, and railroad; tells you the sense and the fast transition from city-suburb, to farms and rural. It really is a unique sight to see, and a characteristic of the city. Right off the avenue, sits a strip mall with a Arby's, Dollar General, and other small stores and a Home Depot, right in the suburban heart but not even a minute away from the avenue. To give you the sense of the shopping area's size, we couldn't even cover it in one photo from the end at the Roundabout! Show's how big it really is! We will see you next time here at Saint Clements Parish!
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