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Found 131 results

  1. New Zealand

    Today we'll be taking a look at one of the world's most beautiful countries - New Zealand. With geysers, mountains, fjords, and waterfalls dotting the landscape - along with some of the of the world's most beautiful cities - any trip here is truly unforgettable. We'll start off in the countryside on the South Island - with the sheep population outnumbering people 7 to 1 - expect to see sheep and plenty of them for as far as the eye can see. You may get stuck in a traffic jam or two here as well.. New Zealand is a land of incredible natural wonders, and one of its most beautiful destinations can be found deep in Fiordland National Park. Cascading 1,904 feet from Lake Quill, there's really no other place on Earth like the incredible Sutherland Falls. Further north in Fiordland National Park is another one of New Zealand's wonders - Milford Sound. This incredibly grand fiord is a natural treasure, with towering peaks and pristine forests surrounding its shores. Not surprisingly, the fiord is a popular cruise ship destination as well. Our last stop on the South Island is none other than New Zealand's tallest point - 12,218 foot tall Mount Cook. The Maoris of the Ngai Tahu tribe who live here believe the mountain has a sacred connection as well - Aoraki (as its referred to in their language) is believed to be the most sacred of ancestors from which they descend. New Zealand is also a land of geysers - and some of the most amazing ones can be found in Rotorua. The famed Pohutu Geyser erupts up to 20 times a day - at heights up to 100 feet tall - making it one of the most popular attractions in the area. Our last stop will be in New Zealand's largest city - Auckland. Founded back in 1840, it's served as an important industrial and business center ever since, as well as being one of the chief seaports in the region. The skyline is home to a variety of stunning buildings - but they're all dwarfed by the magnificent Sky Tower. Rising 722 feet above the city, the observation deck offers some truly incredible views of the city - and if you're brave enough, bungee jumping as well. St. Patrick's Cathedral in the heart of downtown is one of the most beautiful sights in the city. The ANZ Centre is the city's third tallest skyscraper - rising 469 feet tall, it was the city's tallest building when completed in 1991. Some overviews of Auckland's stunning skyline. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Toronto" Thanks to @JP Schriefer, @Tonraq, @Haljackey, @redfox85, @Edvarz, @bobolee, @tariely, @CorinaMarie, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @art128, @Toby Ferrian, @Dgmc2013, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @Manuel-ito, @PaulSawyer, @Ling Ziming, @GenericUser, @BruceTedder, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, @jakis, @Bastet69008, @SC4L0ver, @feyss, @rathefalcon, @sucram17, @Akallan, @Elenphor, @Ducio, @Wallibuk, @Urban Constanta, @RobertLM78, & @Jonas Chaves for all the likes!
  2. What's the Message Mean?

    Hello, When I make a reply ina topic, I saw this message: Thanks.
  3. Toronto

    Toronto is the capital of Ontario - and with nearly 6 million people living in its metropolitan area, its the largest city in Canada as well. The city is a global center of banking, communications, and business - and its location makes it a vital transportation hub in the region. The city boats one of the best skylines in all of North America - with its downtown filled with an array of stunning buildings. Our first stop is Billy Bishop Toronto City Airport. Located on a small island in Lake Ontario, this waterfront airport was first opened back in 1939 as the city's first commercial airport and and has remained one of Canada's busiest airports ever since. Located on the shores of Lake Ontario, the Port of Toronto has been connecting Toronto to the rest of the globe for nearly a century. Its convenient location - close by to railways, highways, and other shipping routes - has made it one of Canada's most important inland ports. The downtown is filled with towering skyscrapers - such as the 951 foot tall First Canadian Place on the left. One of the rare big snowfalls in the city. A few of the city's recently completed skyscrapers: the 715 foot tall Bay Adelaide Centre West and 688 foot tall Ritz-Carlton Toronto. Our last destination will be the city's most iconic landmark... No trip to Toronto is complete without a trip to the famed CN Tower. First opening back in 1976, this 1,815 foot tall tower was the world's tallest freestanding tower upon completion. Be sure to visit the 360 degree rotating restaurant and the viewdeck at the top - on a clear day you can barely make out the skyline of Niagara Falls some 40 miles away. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Los Angeles" Thanks to @CorinaMarie, @Toby Ferrian, @mike_oxlong, @SC4L0ver, @Dgmc2013, @redfox85, @_Michael, @Namiko, @bobolee, @Bastet69008, @tariely, @nos.17, @Silur, @BruceTedder, @MAW, @Lieux, @JP Schriefer, @MushyMushy, @Odainsaker, @nRVOUS, @scotttbarry, @The British Sausage, @Tonraq, @mrsmartman, @Ling Ziming, @raynev1, @Don_Pato, @Bluthlucidity, @PaulSawyer, @PHBSD, @Jonas_Chaves, & @matias93 for all the likes!
  4. Hong Kong

    Today we're taking a look at Hong Kong - this global financial hub and port city boasts one of the world's most stunning and recognizable skylines. This city was originally under British rule for 99 years - but in 1997 it returned to China and now is a special administrative region (SAR). We're starting off in Kowloon - located on the mainland across Victoria Harbor, it's well known for its markets and endless apartments. The streets are constantly crowded, it's an area that's always filled with energy and activity. Hankow Road is one of Kowloon's most famous roads - with countless signs and advertisements crowding the streets, its one of the city's most distinctive sights. Tian Tan Buddha is one of Hong Kong's most famous attractions and offers incredible views of the city. Since it's opening in 1993, it has become well known in the city as a symbol of Buddhism and nature. At night, the skyline of Hong Kong is even more amazing. Here we take a look at the Bank of China Tower - one of Hong Kong's most distinctive and remarkable buildings. Standing 1,205 feet tall, it was Hong Kong and Asia's tallest building for two years after its completion in 1990. The 1,227 foot tall Central Plaza is another one of the city's most beautiful skyscrapers, it originally opened in 1992 and overtook the Bank of China Tower as the city's tallest until 2003. In 2003, Two International Finance Center was completed and overtook Central Plaza as the city's tallest at the time, standing 1,352 feet tall. Another one of Hong Kong's most famous skyscrapers can be seen close by as well - The Center was completed in 1998 and is currently the city's 5th tallest with a height of 1,135 feet tall. Hong Kong's tallest building is the International Commerce Centre - rising 1,538 feet tall, this incredible building took nearly 8 years to build and was finally completed in 2010. It's currently the world's 10th tallest building, and the views from the top are truly extraordinary. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Berlin (Pt. 2/2)" Thanks to @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @RandyE, @jakis, @_Michael, @The British Sausage, @matias93, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @bobolee, @mike_oxlong, @Dgmc2013, @mattb325,@Jonas_Chaves, @scotttbarry, @MushyMushy, @SC4L0ver, @raynev1, @Lazarou Monkey Terror, @mrsmartman, @BruceTedder, @Elenphor, & @Finnbhennach for all the likes!
  5. Berlin (Pt. 2/2)

    Our trip to Berlin resumes with a visit to another one of its oldest and most famous landmarks - Brandenburg Gate. Opened in 1791, it was built on orders by Prussian king Frederick William II to commemorate the restoration of the country after the early Batavian Revolution. It's amazed locals and tourists alike ever since. The Gendarmenmarkt is one of the city's most famous squares, constantly filled with action. With its historic twin cathedrals on both sides, Französischer Dom and Deutscher Dom, its a sight you won't want to miss. Deutscher Dom at night. A view of the streets of Berlin - with one of its most famous avenues, the Unter Den Linden cutting across towards the top. Staatsbibliothek is a prominent universal library constructed in 1903, located on the famous Unter Den Linden. At night time, it's truly spectacular. Unter Den Linden from above. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Berlin (Pt. 1/2)" Thanks to @MushyMushy, @jakis, @RandyE, @matias93, @CorinaMarie, @Zerx, @SC4L0ver, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @_Michael, @mrsmartman, @TekindusT, @Toby Ferrian, @kingofsimcity, @bobolee, @feyss, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @The British Sausage, @nos.17, @raynev1, @Elenphor, @mattb325, & @Akallan for all the likes!
  6. Berlin (Pt. 1/2)

    After taking a look at Rome in the last couple of updates, we're now taking a look at another one of Europe's great cities - the capital of Germany, Berlin. The city is filled with famous monuments - and the first couple that we'll visit are located on the banks of the Spree River. The Alte Nationalgalerie (the long museum at the top of the picture) was opened in 1876 and houses an impressive collection of artwork and is one of the city's most popular attractions. The Berliner Dom towards the bottom part of the mosaic was opened in 1905 and is one of Europe's most impressive cathedrals. Berliner Dom at night. The Victory Column (Siegessaule) and its roundabout can be found in the Tiergarten - opened in 1873, it was built to commemorate the Prussian victory in the Danish-Prussian War. The Reichstag was originally opened in 1894 to house the German Empire's Imperial Diet. A massive fire in the 1930s along with damage from World War II led to the structure falling into disuse as the parliament used other buildings in the city. Eventually, it was partially refurbished in the 1960s and had an entire renovation in the 1990s, giving it a unique, modern look. The building once again is home to the German parliament. Rotes Rathaus (Red Town Hall) is another one of the city's most famous landmarks - opened in 1869, it serves as the home of the mayor and the government of the Federal state of Berlin. The Fernsehturm TV Tower is Berlin's most prominent landmark - rising 1,198 feet tall, its the tallest building in Germany. The views from the top are truly extraordinary. Fernsehturm is located close to Alexanderplatz - one of the city's most famous squares and one of its most vital transport hubs for over 100 years. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Rome (Pt. 2/2)" Thanks to @scotttbarry, @Akallan, @Tonraq, @Mr Saturn64, @Jonas_Chaves, @bobolee, @raynev1, @Simmer2, @matias93, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @_Michael, @Toby Ferrian, @tariely, @redfox85, @CorinaMarie, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @Odainsaker, @Manuel-ito, & @jakis for all the likes!
  7. Rome (Pt. 2/2)

    Our tour of Rome continues on with one of the world's most famous buildings - the Colosseum. Opened in A.D. 80 and seating more than 50,000 spectators, this impressive arena was home to countless gladiator fights for more than 400 years. While a good portion of the structure has been lost throughout the centuries, there's still plenty left to explore - making it one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city. Once the heart and marketplace of the city, today the Roman Forum lies in a sprawling heap of ruins. With likes of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony once walking across these grounds - there's history everywhere you go. The entire complex was abandoned shortly after the fall of the Roman Empire and quickly fell into a state of disrepair - much of the stone here was used by the locals, leaving many of the legendary temples incomplete. Finally, near the end of the 18th century, large scale excavations started to take place, preserving this legendary landmark. The entire complex remains sunken under the street level - the result of countless excavations over the years. One of the most beautiful and romantic spots in all of Rome is the heart-shaped Villa Borghese park, located in the center of the city. The Giardino del Lago (Lake Garden) is a popular destination - there's no better way to spend a day than renting a boat and rowing across these peaceful waters. With cherry trees dotting much of the park - spring is a truly magical time of year here. The next stop is the Verano Cemetery - a spot with plenty of history as many famous people have been buried here over the centuries. Since it's founding in the early 19th century, its been one of the cities most important cemeteries ever since. Just behind St. Peter's Square in The Vatican lies the stunning dome of St. Peter's Basilica - standing 448 feet tall, it's by far the tallest historic building in the area. Regarded by many as being one of the holiest Catholic shrines on the face of the planet - it's been the traditional burial site for popes and other important religious figures since the 10th century. To this day, the structure remains a place of pilgrimage - with the pope making common appearances for liturgies. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: Just for clarification - the roads in these Rome updates are made up of either MMPs, Lot Editor textures (like around St. Peter's Basilica), or just a massive texture on a prop (like the Colosseum). They were not "photoshopped in" - and neither were the buildings (most were existing BATs on the STEX/LEX, and a few were custom BATs that I got from 3d warehouse, exported them, and used in the game). --- Previous Update: "Rome (Pt. 1/2)" Thanks to @Tyberius06, @Fantozzi, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @gigius76, @Silur, @Manuel-ito, @huzman, @jakis, @CorinaMarie, @mike_oxlong, @Toby Ferrian, @mrsmartman, @tariely, @_Michael, @bobolee, @matias93, @raynev1, @Jonas_Chaves, @MushyMushy, @The British Sausage, @redfox85, @Mr Saturn64, @SC4L0ver, & @Krasner for all the likes and reactions
  8. Rome (Pt. 1/2)

    After taking a look at Ancient Rome - we'll now take a look at this incredible city in the modern day. Our trip to Rome begins with a trip to one of Rome's most famous squares - the stunning Piazza Navona. This square dates back from the 1st century CE, and was originally the site of many great athletic games over the years. Today, it serves as the perfect gathering place for locals and tourists alike. Rome has nearly 2,000 fountains - but perhaps the most impressive of them all is the incredible Trevi Fountain. This baroque masterpiece was completed in 1762 and has been one of the most popular destinations in the city ever since. It's been said that if you throw a coin into the pool with your right hand over your left shoulder - you'll ensure a trip back to Rome in the future. Perhaps the most well preserved building of Ancient Rome, the Pantheon remains to this day as a temple to the Roman Gods. The circular oculus at the top allows light to enter, as well as the rain and any other natural elements. While there's numerous ways to get to the Pantheon, you can't go wrong with the time-tested solution: a horse drawn carriage through the streets of Rome. Located entirely inside of Rome, The Vatican might be the world's smallest country, but it holds many treasured landmarks. St. Peter's Square is one of the world's most famous squares - it's 283 columns, standing 55 feet tall each are truly unmistakable. Papal audiences are held here regularly, drawing big crowds - but its Easter and Christmas Masses are by far the largest, drawing tourists from the world over. On a steep hillside in the heart of Ancient Rome is where you'll find one of the world's most famous staircases - the Spanish Steps. These 135 steps connect the Piazza di Spagna (Spanish Square) at the bottom to the Trinità dei Monti church at the top - and making the climb is something that you won't want to miss. The millions of tourists over the years making the climb hasn't come without a price, however. With the staircase falling into a state of disrepair, with weeds and cracks taking over - a multi-million dollar restoration was called for and recently completed. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Roman Empire (Pt. 3/3)" Thanks to @MushyMushy, @CorinaMarie, @RandyE, @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @kingofsimcity, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Chief ZDN, @jakis, @TekindusT, @mrsmartman, @huzman, @The British Sausage, @Marushine, @bobolee, @Maloskero, @Elenphor, @Odainsaker, @tonyr, @mattb325, @Finnbhennach, & @Manuel-ito for all the likes!
  9. Roman Empire (Pt. 3/3)

    For our last chapter of the Roman Empire - we're taking a look at the fall of the Empire. While the Roman Empire was still growing, close attention had to be paid to its borders to make sure invaders wouldn't get in - a sign of things perhaps to come. Hadrian's Wall was initially opened in 128 in Britain to make sure that various tribes couldn't make their way inside. By the 200s and 300s though, the Roman Empire was clearly in a state of great decline. In 284 the empire split into two - the Western and Eastern Roman Empires - and the Western Roman Empire was soon in trouble. Rome was left in a vulnerable position and had fallen from power - so capital was moved to Milan and later Ravenna. In 402, an up and coming Visigoth leader - Alaric I - made his was through Italy and was looking to invade as many cities as possible. It didn't end well for him though in the Battle of Verona - as general Stilicho was able to hold him off and force his retreat. Alaric would return however, and swiftly made his way to the weakened former capital of Rome in 410. He led the Sack of Rome - and his men looted whatever they could find. After several previous sackings, Rome a former shell of itself. One more sack in 455 by the Vandals would truly mark the beginning of the end. Rome was left with only a few hundred people - and the rest of the empire was in complete shambles. In 476, Emperor Romulus was deposed by the barbarian Odoacer - marking the end of the Western Roman Empire. While the Western Roman Empire was clearly no more - the Eastern Roman Empire and it's capital of Constantinople would survive and even thrive for nearly 1,000 years afterwards. However, it was in the 1200s that everything started to fall apart. The crusades left the city in a vulnerable position, and the nearby Ottomans could sense it. In 1453, their fearless leader Mehmed II led an army nearly 100,000 strong to the gates of the city, to conquer the city he always dreamed about leading. Constantinople had a famed series of defensive walls running along its perimeter - and it was widely believed that no one would ever make it past. However, a use of new technology would prove to be its downfall. The Ottomans brought up to 70 massive cannons with them, and bombarded the city for 53 straight days. The Byzantines of Constantinople tried their best to continually rebuild the walls - but they were no match for Mehmed II's siege. May 29th, 1453 would mark the end of the Fall of Constantinople - Mehmed's men quickly invaded the city after destroying the walls - looting, pillaging, and destroying what they could find. After 24 hours though, he ordered his men to stop with the city in complete shambles. "What a town this was! And we have allowed it to be destroyed!" proclaimed Mehmed. With Constantinople now in the Ottoman's hands - the last vestige of the Roman Empire was no more. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Roman Empire (Pt. 2/3)" Thanks to @kingofsimcity, @RobertLM78, @Fantozzi, @matias93, @Toby Ferrian, @Manuel-ito, @Krasner, @CorinaMarie, @redfox85, @tonyr, @SC4L0ver, @Celast, @gigius76, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @bobolee, @The British Sausage, @jakis, @raynev1, @Jonas_Chaves, @Mr Saturn64, @nRVOUS, & @Prophet42 for all the likes!
  10. Hello, Security is important. Lots of sites have a security center. Imagine if I am a security researcher/white-hat hacker and I found an exploit. What should I do? Is there a security center? Is it private? Does the community have a good disclosure process? Thanks.
  11. Roman Empire (Pt. 2/3)

    Our journey through the ancient Roman Empire continues with a trip to the Roman Forum - constructed shortly after the completion of Caesar's Forum, it plays a vital role in the infancy of the Roman Empire - holding processions, elections, and trials - and also for being one of the most important meeting places in the city. The Circus Maximus is continually improved over the years, and is given its final shape during the reign of Caesar in 46 BCE. The Romans loved chariot racing and for hundreds of years, this site was one of the premier racetracks around. Once fully developed, it became the model for other circuses all throughout the Roman Empire. In 64 CE, much of Rome is devastated in the Great Fire of Rome. Six days of flames ravage the city, destroying many of the city's most prized monuments. The summer winds fanned the flames even more, causing roughly 70% of the city to be left in smouldering ruin. After the Great Fire, much of the city is rebuilt - and couple new grand buildings are built as well. The Colosseum was the most impressive structure of them all, first opening back in 80 CE. The largest amphitheater ever built, it held gladiator fights, mock sea battles, and just about everything else imaginable. Our last sight is The Pantheon - opened in 126 CE, it was one of the city's most important temples to worship the Roman Gods. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Roman Empire (Pt. 1/3)" Thanks to @MisterBlueStar4, @RandyE, @Odainsaker, @scotttbarry, @tonyr, @Finnbhennach, @RobertLM78, @Manuel-ito, @Toby Ferrian, @Celast, @CorinaMarie, @matias93, @gigius76, @mike_oxlong, @SC4L0ver, @Fantozzi, @bobolee, @Simmer2, @Jonas_Chaves, @geminijen, @redfox85, @bladeberkman, @mrsmartman, @kschmidt, @The British Sausage, @Mr Saturn64 for all the likes & reactions!
  12. Roman Empire (Pt. 1/3)

    For the next three updates we'll be taking a look at one of the world's greatest civilizations - the Roman Empire. We'll take a look at the humble beginnings, rise to power, and eventual downfall of this incredible empire - and all the major events along the way. Our look back into the past begins in 753 BCE - and Rome, the eventual capital of the empire, is founded on Palatine Hill by Romulus. It's still the Iron Age - and the only structures you'll find here are thatched roof huts. It may not look like much right now - but soon, the city will start to take shape. By 509 BCE, major changes are starting to take place in Rome. The last king has been expelled, which marks the beginning of the Roman Republic. Rome now has a constitution and a Republican government - and some of its first grand structures are starting to be built on Capitoline Hill, such as the Temple of Jupiter. As the Republic starts to expand - its clear that having appropriate infrastructure to keep up will be vital. Some of the first aqueducts are built around 312 BCE, providing much needed water to some of the Republic's most important cities. While the empire is growing rapidly - its also attracting the attention of outside invaders. The Carthaginian leader Hannibal and his troops wanted a piece of the Republic - but an invasion from the south (modern day Tunisia) would be too predictable and would be easily countered. Ingeniously, he led his troops (and an entire herd of elephants!) north into Iberia and across the Alps - on route to Italy in a surprise sneak attack. While Hannibal achieves his goal of making it into Italy without facing the Roman navy or land garrisons - his next big challenge will be trying to defeat a much larger Roman army at the Battle of Cannae. Despite being outnumbered, he uses brilliant military tactics to take down the Romans and secure a crucial victory, one that causes the Romans to fear him for years to come. Even to this day, Hannibal is widely regarded as one of the greatest military leaders of all time. Despite a couple defeats, the Roman Republic continues to move forward and prosper. Rome is expanding greatly - and a number of magnificent structures are beginning to be built. In 46 BCE the Forum of Caesar is built for Julius Caesar - and serves as a meeting place for the Senate. Rome's power is continuing to grow - and we'll be taking an depth look at the height of Rome in the next update. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Ancient Egypt" Thanks to @mike_oxlong, @CorinaMarie, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @RobertLM78, @Odainsaker, @Dreadnought, @bladeberkman, @Prophet42, @Toby Ferrian, @The British Sausage, @Krisman, @mrsmartman, @RandyE, @nRVOUS, @Akallan, @SC4L0ver, @kschmidt, @_Michael, @Maloskero, @Tonraq, @Marushine, @scotttbarry, @raynev1, @Manuel-ito, @Elenphor, @Edvarz, @Krasner, & @nos.17 for the likes & reactions!
  13. Ancient Egypt

    Today, we're traveling back to 2500 BCE to Ancient Egypt to take a look some of the greatest man made wonders of all time, along with some of the stunning surrounding landscape. We begin with the The Great Sphinx of Giza - the most recognizable statue of Ancient Egypt - and even to this day, it remains one of the world's most famous statues. It features a lion's body with the head of an Egyptian king - and was carved of out limestone most likely during the reign of King Khafre (2558-2532 BCE). The Nile River was truly vital to Ancient Egypt in a number of ways - not just for crops and irrigation, but for also allowing ships to sail from city to city. Small docks like this one lined the edge of the river. The land surrounding the Nile River was nutrient rich, and had excellent farming conditions. The ancient Egyptians called the soil "The Gift of the Nile" - and a variety of crops could be planted such as wheat, figs, barley, melons, and figs. We move on to the pyramids - it took three generations to complete this complex, and it was well worth the wait. Despite their condition today - the pyramids were once coated in polished white limestone - one of the most incredible sights imaginable. Each pyramid has a series of chambers underneath - and are believed to be tombs for their namesakes. The Pyramid of Khufu - also known as the Great Pyramid of Giza - was the largest of these pyramids. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to still remain to this day. The Pyramid of Khafre is the second largest of the Pyramids (although it might look taller due the fact it's on a higher elevation) - but has a much more elaborate complex of chambers and was also once connected to the Sphinx by a walkway. The Pyramid of Menkaure was the smallest of the three - to set it apart and to give it a unique look, the lower portion is encased in granite. Finally, some overviews of the entire area. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Big thanks to @tariely, @redfox85, @RandyE, @RobertLM78, @raynev1, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @CorinaMarie, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @The British Sausage, @Akallan, @Elenphor, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, & @SC4L0ver for the likes on the preview!
  14. Ancient Egypt (Preview)

    Ancient Egypt (Preview) Ancient Egypt has always been a personal favorite place of mine - and I'm finally making it a reality in SC4. I recently found an awesome model online which I exported into a number of parts and assembled it in the game.. and the results are impressive. (If anyone is really interested in it, I'll try to contact the author to see if I can re upload it). From there it was a matter of custom lotting it and carefully removing the base textures - if anyone's interested, I did a guide on that process in my Year In Review entry. I'm planning on doing some more commentary and guides in the future though Anyways, I'm putting the finishing touches on this scene - its covering the Pyramids, Sphinx, Nile River, and some of the surrounding farmland.. expect to see the full update very soon! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - Landmarks" Big thanks to @Tonraq,@Odainsaker, @RobertLM78, @bladeberkman, @tariely, @CorinaMarie, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @nRVOUS, @kingofsimcity, @mike_oxlong, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @matias93, @jakis, @Fantozzi, @Pluispixel, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @Akallan, @redfox85, @bobolee, @Angry Mozart, @sucram17, @SC4L0ver. @Krasner, @kelistmac, @europe.au, @geminijen, @Simmer2, @gigius76, & @raynev1 for all the likes!
  15. London - Landmarks

    For the final chapter of London, we're taking a look at some more of the city's most iconic landmarks. We begin with a look back in time to the 1200s - to the Old London Bridge. Constructed in 1209 - this bridge stood for over 600 years as the main route across the River Thames. While long gone, various drawings from the era depict a bustling bridge surrounded by medieval houses on both sides. Unfortunately, the design of the bridge led to its ultimate demise, as it impeded river traffic - and was eventually demolished in the 1800s to make way for a more modern bridge. The next stop is one of London's most awe-inspiring buildings - St. Paul's Cathedral. Designed by famed architect Christopher Wren and opened in 1708, it was part of a major rebuilding program after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The cathedral serves as the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London - and is one of the city's most popular attractions as well. The London Eye is one of the city's most popular attractions - located on the banks of the River Thames, it was the world's largest Ferris wheel when completed in 2000. If you can get past the long lines, the views of the city's South Bank from the top are incredible. We continue on with a trip to one of London's most famous bridges - Tower Bridge. Not to be confused with the original London Bridge (as seen in the first picture, since replaced with more modern versions) - this Victorian Gothic landmark has been one of the city's most distinctive sights since its completion in 1894. Close by Tower Bridge is another one of the city's famous landmarks - the Tower of London. This historic structure was built back in the 1190s and has served as a fortress, palace, and prison. Our next stop is one of the city's most famous squares - Trafalgar Square. Its named after the famed Battle of Trafalgar - a key British naval victory in 1805 - and it's been a popular gathering place for people (and pigeons) since 1840. The iconic Nelson's Column in the middle of the square is one of the city's most famous monuments. Our last stop is one of the world's most iconic buildings - Big Ben. This famous clock tower is located on the north end of the Palace of Westminster and has chimed since 1859. Recent maintenance repairs though means you'll have to wait until 2021 to hear it regularly again. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - The City & The Shard" Big thanks to @matias93, @RobertLM78, @The British Sausage, @Angry Mozart, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @bobolee, @nos.17, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @APSMS, @mike_oxlong, @mattb325, @SC4L0ver, @Mr Saturn64, @Dreadnought, @tonyr, @jakis, @Neto Dari, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Tonraq, @Elenphor, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
  16. Site Header Redesign

    Hello, The major redesign of the site header led by @corinagrigorovici (eh, @CorinaMarie) and @CycleDogg (again, I mean @Cyclone Boom) is awesome. A new logo is included in the top of the logomark (text as a logo). This change also brought a new thing, @A Nonny Moose memorial button with its tooltip. But, anything in the world isn't perfect. Simtropolis' header has some flaws. The logo location is above the logo, which not fine. This isn't a problem if the logo isn't too tall like the Walt Disney logo, but our logo is too tall. So, we need to resize our logo so the logo isn't too tall. Or, switch to unstacked version, like SimCity 4 Devotion or Ubuntu did. If two choices aren't sufficient, you may switch to logomark only version, while using the logo in cases like Twitter avatar. The memorial button location isn't fine, thanks to the very tall logo. The fix is relevant too, fix the logo first, then align the button if not correct. I hope you'll accept my suggestions. Sorry for mistakes. Thanks.
  17. London - The City & The Shard

    Our trip to London continues with another look at its incredible skyline. After taking a look at Canary Wharf in the first update, we're taking a look at London's other main financial district - The City of London, also known as The City, along with The Shard today. One of the city's most distinctive skyscrapers is the 591 foot tall 30 St Mary Axe (also referred to as the Gherkin, due its resemblance to a cucumber). Since opening in 2004, it has received many awards for its unique style and ecological footprint. Three of London's tallest buildings (from left to right) - Tower 42 (Completed 1980, 600 feet tall), 99 Bishopsgate (Completed 1976, 341 feet tall), and 122 Leadenhall Street (Completed 2014, 738 feet tall - also known as the cheese grater) Another rainy day in London. A couple various shots of The City. The Shard has become one of London's most recognizable buildings since opening in 2013 - rising 86 floors and 1,016 feet tall, its the tallest building in the United Kingdom and offers breathtaking views from the top. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "London - Canary Wharf" Big thanks to @kschmidt, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @TekindusT, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @huzman, @matias93, @_Michael, @Angry Mozart, @tariely. @tonyr, @The British Sausage, @Talla 2XLC, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @redfox85, @Oerk, @bobolee, @bladeberkman, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @Odainsaker, & @Marushine for all the likes & reactions!
  18. London - Canary Wharf

    London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It's a city known for its culture, history, and traditions - and is one of the world's most visited cities. Additionally, it's one of the world's greatest commercial, financial, and industrial centers - and is widely known as a truly global city. Over the next three update updates I'll be covering some of the city's most incredible sights and landmarks - starting with Canary Wharf. This major banking district is located on the Isle of Dogs on the banks of the River Thames - and has been home to some of the busiest ports in the world over the years. Today, its best known for its incredible collection of skyscrapers like the 771 ft tall One Canada Square (lower middle below, with the pyramid top), 655 ft tall 8 Canada Square (HSBC Tower, lower left below), and the 655 ft tall 25 Canada Square (middle skyscraper below, citigroup signage) - which are among the tallest in the United Kingdom. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 3/3)" Big thanks to @jakis, @RobertLM78, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @RandyE, @Silur, @Fantozzi, @mike_oxlong, @redfox85, @_Michael, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Odainsaker, @kschmidt, @The British Sausage, @SC4L0ver, @bobolee, @mrsmartman, @raynev1, @scotttbarry, @Elenphor, @Marushine, & @huzman for all the likes!
  19. Paris (Pt. 3/3)

    Our trip to Paris continues with a trip to the Sacré-Cœur Basilica (Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris) - one of Paris' most beautiful churches, often drawing comparisons to the Taj Mahal. Located on top of a small hill in the heart of the city, the church is visible for miles around. The next stop is Place de la Concorde - Paris' most famous square. Originally designed in 1755, this square is unlike anything else in the city - complete with a massive authentic Egyptian obelisk in the middle. The Panthéon, located in Paris' Latin Quarter, is another one of the cities most famed landmarks. Originally modeled after Rome's Pantheon and built as a church - it now functions as a mausoleum for many of France's most famous citizens. The Bourse de commerce is one of the city's most unique buildings, both in shape and function. It was originally used as a place to trade grain upon completion in 1763, then as a stock exchange, and more recently, plans are underway to transform it into a major art museum. The 689 foot tall Tour Montparnasse is the tallest skyscraper in Paris - and is hard to miss. Upon completion in 1973, the building was heavily criticized for its style and for being out of place - and as a result, buildings over 7 stories tall were banned from the city center. A massive renovation is slated to begin in 2019. Our tour of Paris ends with one of the city's most famous landmarks - the Arc de Triomphe. Built between 1803 and 1836, this iconic monument serves as a tribute to French soldiers lost in wars and has important military leaders engraved on its walls. For those wishing to get up close - make sure you use the underground tunnels instead of dodging the traffic.. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 2/3)" Big thanks to @CorinaMarie, @Odainsaker, @MushyMushy, @matias93, @Angry Mozart, @RobertLM78, @Silur, @_Michael, @The British Sausage, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @Fantozzi, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @bobolee, @raynev1, @APSMS, @SC4L0ver, @gigius76, @bladeberkman, @kingofsimcity, @Haljackey, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @jakis, @Talla 2XLC, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  20. Paris (Pt. 2/3)

    Our tour picks back up with a trip to La Madeleine - one of the city's most recognizable churches. Originally designed as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army - its Greek style sets it apart from the rest. Since its completion in 1842, it's been one of the most popular attractions in the city. The Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe is one of the most beautiful theaters in the city and one of France's six national theaters. The Palais Garnier is one of Paris' most grand opera houses - opened in 1875, it's a true masterpiece. The next stop is one of Paris' most unique landmarks - the Centre Pompidou. Completed in 1977, this enormous colored building is covered in a maze of pipes going in every direction - and has housed a popular art museum ever since. (Animation might take a little bit to completely load) Our last stop today is one of the world's most famous landmarks - the Eiffel Tower. Completed in 1889 for the Universal Exposition to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution - this 986 foot tall tower became the world's tallest freestanding structure for over 40 years. It's remained an icon of Paris and France ever since. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 1/3)" Big thanks to @kingofsimcity, @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @RobertLM78, @huzman, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Manuel-ito, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Silur, @redfox85, @Tyberius06, @Andrey km, @bobolee, @MushyMushy, @The British Sausage, @mrsmartman, @matias93, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Girafe, @jakis, @feyss, @martijn.1, @Transport, & @Elenphor for all the likes!
  21. Paris (Pt. 1/3)

    Paris is the capital and largest city of France and has been one of the world's most important cities for centuries. This timeless city is known for its fashion, food, literature, entertainment, and culture. In addition, it's widely known as being an important international business and commerce center - making it a truly global city. Paris also boasts some of the world's finest architecture and much of the city was renovated in the mid 1800s by architect Georges-Eugène Haussmann. Over the next three updates we'll be taking a look at some of its most iconic sights and landmarks. We'll begin with a trip down one of the city's most famous avenues - the Champs-Élysées. First completed in 1670 and redeveloped many times since, its impressive tree-lined streets are surrounded by many of the city's most luxurious shops, cafes, and theaters. On Bastille Day (July 14th), it's also home to the largest military parade in Europe. The next stop is one of the city's most stunning cathedrals, the famous Notre-Dame de Paris. Opened in 1345, this awe-inspiring building is considered to be one of the world's finest examples of French Gothic architecture. La Défense is Europe's largest purpose built business district and is where you'll find just about all of Paris' skyscrapers. The uniquely shaped Grande Arche in the middle is the centerpiece of the district - opened in 1989, it serves as a monument for the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution. The Louvre is another one of Paris' premier destinations - inside you'll find the famous Mona Lisa in its art museum. Our last stop for today is the Gare du Nord - first built back in 1846, this famous train station has been rebuilt time and time again to expand it's capacity. Today, it's the world's busiest train station outside of Japan and connects Paris with a number of other cities across France. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Prague" Big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @RobertLM78, @mrsmartman, @Oerk, @The British Sausage, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @bladeberkman, @mike_oxlong, @RandyE, @Odainsaker, @bobolee, @Talla 2XLC, @Manuel-ito, @tariely, @raynev1, @redfox85, @SC4L0ver, @Simmer2, @kingofsimcity, @Jonas_Chaves, & @Nenitosoyyo for all the likes!
  22. Prague

    Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic and one of the most picturesque cities in all of Europe. It's a city steeped in history - once the capital of the kingdom of Bohemia, its been a cultural, political, and economic center for centuries. The first stop in our tour is the Petrín Lookout Tower - located at the top of a small hill, this 62m tall Eiffel Tower lookalike offers stunning views of the city. Not too far away is another one of Prague's famous landmarks - St. Vitus Cathedral. Construction took nearly 600 years, finally completing in 1929 - but this magnificent Gothic cathedral was well worth the wait. Countless religious and coronation ceremonies have been held here - making it one of the most important landmarks in the city. To make it into the old town, you'll have to cross the Charles Bridge, spanning the Vlatva River. Completed in 1402, this stunning Gothic styled bridge is one of Prague's most famous landmarks and one of the world's most famous bridges. We've made it into the famed old town. With the incredible Týn Church and Astronomical Clock close by, this stunning town square is steeped in history. The aforementioned Týn Church (fully known as the Church of Our Lady before Týn) is one of the world's most beautiful Gothic churches - built back in the mid 1400s and completed by the mid 1600s, it towers some 260 feet above the surrounding rooftops of Prague. The cathedral also serves as a gallery of Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque works - its a historic site in Prague that anyone visiting here should be sure to visit. Like many other similar cities and towns across Bohemia and Central Europe, Prague enjoys a rich tradition of Christmas markets. Starting in early December and ending by early January, the stalls here have an unbelievable amount of goods on sale - from treats, decorations, handmade goods and more. For those braving the elements - the selection is second to none and its a trip you won't soon forget. No Christmas market is complete though of course without an enormous Christmas tree - and the ones here can get as high as 100 feet tall, making it truly a sight to behold. Once nightfall hits and the snow begins to clear - you can get a clear view of the twinkling lights and all the magic this place has to offer. Another one of Prague's famed traditions is the legendary fireworks display that takes place on New Year's Eve - the entire town gathers in the square and surrounding streets to take in the breathtaking views. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Elenphor, @The British Sausage, @Oerk, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Neto Dari, @TekindusT, & @mrsmartman for all the likes!
  23. Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)

    Our journey to Cephalonia concludes with one last trip through the countryside. From the winding roads, small farms, and stunning natural beauty - there's so many things that makes this island so beautiful, and makes it a fitting way to end our trip. Additionally, I'll be showcasing some more overviews of Cephalonia. We were last at Myrtos Beach - and after a fun day at the beach, we made accommodations at the nearby Plaza Myrtos for the night. Once nightfall hits, the only lights you'll find in the distance are that of the occasional boat or two. It's quiet and peaceful - but also quite beautiful. Our room in the villa happens to overlook the edge of the beach - so we get an excellent view of the sunrise. Fortunately, we didn't have to deal with any of the rain at the beach.. The rain finally lets up - but is quickly replaced by a blanket of thick fog for most of the evening. The Cephalonian countryside is crossed by a variety of winding roads. There's no such thing as a dull drive here - and between every twist and turn, the views are incredible. Small, charming churches like this one dot the countryside. Two last overviews of the Cephalonian countryside. And to wrap things up - a couple of full tile overviews. (Click for full size.) I hope you enjoyed your visit to Cephalonia! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Myrtos Beach)" Big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @RobertLM78, @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @redfox85, @bobolee, @_Michael, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @Manuel-ito, @mrsmartman, @Jonas_Chaves, @raynev1, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, & @Talla 2XLC for all the likes!
  24. Cephalonia (Myrtos Beach)

    Our next stop is Myrtos Beach - arguably the most beautiful location in all of Cephalonia. Due to it's remote location, you won't be able to reach it by foot - the only way to reach Myrtos Beach it is to traverse your way down a series of steep curves. If you're able to make it there however, you'll be rewarded greatly with warm waters, soft white sand, and the view of a lifetime. The day starts early for anyone wanting a prime spot at the beach - and the roads throughout the surrounding countryside are already starting to fill up with cars. The roads slowly start to get steeper and steeper - a sign that we're getting closer to the beach. As we start to see scree slopes dot the surrounding hills - it means we're just about there. We stop at an overlook and get our first good look of the beach. It's quite stunning.. but the first order of business is how to get down there. There's only one way, and it's not for the faint of the heart. A steep road filled with hairpin curves traverses down the mountainside - and when it gets busy, it only becomes that much more intimidating. But if you can make it down to the bottom, you'll be rewarded greatly. We're finally at the beach! We get a great spot and start soaking up the sun. A couple of Myrtos Beach panoramas (click for full-size). The beach in all its glory. If you can get past the huge crowds, there's really no other place like it on Cephalonia. It's a truly stunning natural wonder. And finally, various views of the beach and surrounding countryside from above. Myrtos Beach is truly a quite a sight to behold. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Rural Scenes)" Big thanks to @Artimus, @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @Manuel-ito, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, @_Michael, @RobertLM78, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Maloskero, @mrsmartman, @Neto Dari, @Marushine, @bobolee, @Prophet42, @Odainsaker, @redfox85, @GoKingsGo, & @SC4L0ver for all the likes!
  25. Cephalonia (Rural Scenes)

    For our next chapter of Cephalonia, we stay in the countryside - but this time, focusing on the small village of Anomeria and a number of surrounding rural scenes. Quaint villages like these dot the landscape for as far as the eye can see - while they may be small, they more than make up for it with their charm and character. Early morning in rural Greece is truly special - there's really nothing else like it. While most days are sunny and beautiful here - it's not uncommon for fog to roll in at the blink of an eye. ... rain showers are probably the only thing that can spoil your day here. But the rain is usually gone as quick as it rolls in. The golden sunsets of rural Greece are something that you don't want to miss out on. Nighttime here is quiet, yet beautiful. For centuries, small plots of land lined with stone walls have dotted the landscape. They're a cheap, efficient way to divide up fields. When viewed from above - rural Greece can be quite stunning. Myrtos Beach is off in the distance - and it happens to be our next destination Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Farmland)" Big thanks to @MushyMushy, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, @Toby Ferrian, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @Oerk, @Artimus, @redfox85, @bobolee, @_Michael, @Manuel-ito, @raynev1, @The British Sausage, @Elenphor, @Marushine, @Dirktator, @mrsmartman, & @JP Schriefer for all the likes!
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