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About this City Journal

Cape May County is the southernmost county in New Jersey. It has been a popular tourist destination since colonial times. and the city of Cape May claims to be the nation's oldest seashore...

Entries in this City Journal

Jetty Jockey

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<DISCLAIMER > Lots of pics, so please be patient waiting for them to load

In today's update, we visit southwestern Middle Township to look at the towns of Green Creek and Del Haven.

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Green Creek (pronounced by the locals as Green Crick) is a small rural town located between the headwaters of Green Creek ( top, right) and Fishing Creek ( bottom, left and right corners). It is the southernmost of the "Crikker" towns . ( See update 2-26, "Crikkers" for explanation). The area was settled in the mid 1700s , and by the end of the War for American Independence , Green Creek had become a village that was a center of life for the surrounding farms . It has changed little over the next two centuries, maintaining its rural identity.

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Most of Green Creek lies along Delsea Drive (NJ Route 47, left side), including all of its commercial. More recent development has sprung up along Burleigh Road ( east-west road) as the town is evolving to a more residential area.

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The intersection of Delsea Drive and Bayshore Road (County Road 603) is considered the center of town.(looking west) The Green Creek Volunteer Fire Department, noted for its bright green engines, lies to the west on Bayshore Road.

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To the west of Green Creek is the Del Haven tile. Originally called Norbury's Landing, it was once a small fishing village, It has become more of a bedroom community for folks working on the resort islands. To the south is the smaller community of Sunray Beach. Bayshore Road turns south to parallel the bayshore.

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the bayshore , looking south from the site of the original landing. Like most of the towns along Delaware Bay, Del haven took a beating during Hurricane Sandy. Sunray Beach is in the background.

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South of Sunray Beach is Fishing Creek, which forms some of the boundary between Middle and Lower Townships. Once a tidal creek, a sluice gate and pump were built to regulate water levels to control the mosquito population. When the outfall pipe was buried under tons of sand after storms, the sluice became inoperable and the waters backed up to flood the adjacent lowlands. It is one of Cape May County's larger fresh water habitats and has since been designated as a waterfowl sanctuary.

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Aerial view of the Fishing Creek meadows.

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Bayshore Road crosses Fishing Creek into Lower Township.

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Fishing Creek, looking west from Bayshore Road. Acres of phragmites, some as tall as fifteen feet, have taken over and make this a prime habitat for waterfowl.

An east to west mosaic down Bayshore Road :

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Replies :

VicRusty : Thanks ! Being a resort, the one thing Cape May County has is plenty of golf courses. I think I've done 12 of the 14 here so far.

Tonraq: Thank you. I've lived here for most of my life, so I have a pretty good feel for the place. :golly:

Mymyjp : Thank you very much. Glad you liked it.

Benedict : Thanks ! Glad to be back.

Phil4hockey51: I didn't even know the storage units were there until I went exploring. They are literally right around the corner from my new house. I'll have to realign the units when I get a chance. That's what I get of just doing a quick drive by instead of checking the satellite pics on Google Earth.

Huston : Thanks a bunch. I really like the ArtGolf stuff. A lot more to scale than others that I've found.

Jetty Jockey

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After a bit of a hiatus, I'm picking up the journal where I left off. A lot has happened in the past year. Cape May County is recovering nicely from the damage dealt by Hurricane Sandy, and

I've had a few events in my personal life, like getting married and buying a house and doing all the little things that go along with them . The good news ( for fans of the journal) is my new

home is in Cape May Court House and is a more centralized location , making fact finding explorations a lot easier than the half hour drive down from Woodbine that I used to do . So without

any further ado, let's get back to business.

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Today's update features the eastern section of Middle Township, notably the villages of Burleigh and Whitesboro.

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Burleigh (pronounced Bur-lee) tile. The area north of Oyster Road ( center E-W road running west from the south edge of the golf course) is Mayville. The Garden State Parkway is flanked by

U.S. Route 9 to the west and Golf Course Road to the east. Further west, Shunpike Road paralells the main North- South routes.

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Mayville . Businesses line the west side of U.S. 9

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Storage units on Oyster Road. A nice place to store belongings safe and secure from any floodwaters.

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East of the Garden State Parkway is the Wildwood Country Club.(looking north)

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Aerial view of the country club. looking east. Hereford Inlet is in the background.

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South of Burleigh is the Whitesboro tile. North of Garden Lake (top, center) is Burleigh. South of the lake is Whitesboro.

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Downtown Burleigh, such as it is. A small cluster of commercial buildings stand at the intersection of U.S. 9 and NJ 147. . The rectangular lake was formed when fill was excavated to build

the overpass of the Garden State Parkway over NJ 147. Groundwater subsequently filled the pit, forming a small lake. Garden Lake Mobile Home Park surrounds the lake.

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A bit west of the intersection of 9 and 147 is the Middle Township Industrial Park. (right) and the local Home Depot.

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Whitesboro, looking west across U.S. 9. Whitesboro was founded about 1901 by the Equitable Industrial Association, which had prominent black American investors including Paul Laurence Dunbar,

the educator Booker T. Washington and George Henry White, the leading investor and namesake. He was an attorney who had moved to Philadelphia after serving as the last black Republican

congressman representing North Carolina's 2nd congressional district. White and his fellow entrepreneurs wanted to create a self-reliant community for blacks, without the discrimination faced

the southern states. * (1)

Shares in the planned community were sold to African Americans from North and South Carolina and Virginia. Once approved, a colonist would receive a number of lots, each 50 feet by 150 feet

(about a sixth of an acre) for a down payment of $5 per lot and a promise to till the land. The residents were under no obligation to build a home or any other structure on their lot, but the

land was promised to be good for growing farm produce and raising chickens, so building homes was encouraged. Colonists had ten years to pay off the initial purchase price of fifty dollars

and were charged an additional $2 to $5 a month depending on their income. In addition to purchasing the initial land for the town, the George H. White Land Improvement Company reinvested its

profits back into the community. Although most of the town’s residents were preoccupied with farming the land, many residents were employed by the Improvement Company to construct the first

buildings and roads in the community. * (2)

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The new Christ Gospel Love Center was built in 2005 to meet the needs of a growing congregation. To the annoyance of its members, it is often jokingly called "Oprah's Church". Stedmon Graham,

Oprah's companion is a Whitesboro native and was a 1,000 point scorer for the Middle Township High School basketball team . Members of the church are quick to point out while Ms. Winfrey

donated the funds to build the ballfield, the funding for the church itself was raised by the congregation.

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Southwest of Whitesboro is the Edgewood section of Middle Township. It's basically a few homes built along the the winding road from Green Creek to Whitesboro.

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The Indian Trail tile, containing the western sections of Burleigh. I had to name it something, so I took the name from the road (CR 618). Indian Trail is so named because before settlement

of the county, it was a major trail used by the Kechemeche tribe to travel to and from thier camps in the woods on the western side of the county ( what is now Green Creek and Dias Creek) to

hunting and fishing grounds near Hereford Inlet.

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A closer look at the sand and gravel mines north of Indian Trail.

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Grassy Sound tile. Heading east from Garden State parkway exit 6 , the road was once an unimproved road leading to a rickety wooden drawbridge over Grassy Sound Channel . This was a

secondary connection to the resorts on Five Mile Beach Island. During the Great Depression squatters built shacks on State owned land, (usually suspended over the marshes atop pilings). By

the 1970s, citing a need to alleviate traffic problems caused by the growth of the Wildwood resorts and a need to provide an additional evacuation route in the event of storms, the state

reasserted its control of the area and ordered the squatters evicted and thier homes demolished to make way for an improved causeway topped by a 4 lane highway.

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A closer look. The ruined remains of the railbed of the Pennsylvania RR North Wildwood line lies to the north of the highway. It was abandoned in the 1930's and the marshes have reclaimed

much of the former rail line's causeway.

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Looking west along North Wildwood Boulevard. Burleigh is in the background.

Well, that's all I have for this installment. I hope to be updating the journal on a more regular basis. Stay tuned !

(1) wikipedia- Whitesboro, NJ

(2) www.blackpast.org/aah/whitesboro-new-jersey-1902

Jetty Jockey

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Greetings, friends, and Happy New Year. Sorry for the delay in getting a post up, but as you can expect, things have been a bit crazy here along the Jersey Shore the past few months. Compared to the devastation experienced to the northern end of the state, we here in Cape May County got off relatively easy. It's been two months since Sandy pummelled the area, and Cape May County is recovering well. There was no gas rationing here. Power was restored to most of the county by the end of the week ( giving a shout out to the power crews from across the nation that came to our aid, you guys are awesome!) and most local businesses were open by Thanksgiving. We here are less impressed by the Federal response. Even though Obama used the Jersey Shore as a photo-op for his re-election campaign, those seeking help from FEMA have been mired in an endless tangle of government red tape, despite Obama's promises to the contrary.

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Hurricane Sandy hit us pretty hard, but fortunately it sped up and made landfall hours before high tide, sparing the region from what could have been a lot worse.

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Unlike the more densely populated area of the northern Jersey Shore, where development extends right to the water's edge, the barrier island communities here have preserved the dune line .The dunes bore the brunt of the storm, sparing the towns behind them from catastrophic damage. When the northern towns rebuild, it is hoped that they use Cape May County's model of dunes and seawalls to protect them from future storms. This is not to say we got off unscathed. Cape May County alone suffered over a billion dollars worth of damage to private properties and infrastructure.

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In Avalon, the ocean washed out the approaches to the Townsend's Inlet bridge, cutting Ocean Drive between Avalon and Sea Isle City. Sea Isle City lost its city hall to flood waters. City government is operating from the public school there.

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The communities along Delaware Bay took it the hardest. The tiny bayfront community of Reed's Beach in Middle Township was devastated by crashing waves.

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When the wooden bulkhead at the south end of town failed, there was nothing left to protect the beachfront homes. Most of the homes there were so severely damaged that they needed to be condemned.

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About a half dozen homes were washed into Delaware Bay. It is doubtful they will be able to rebuild, as the land they once sat on is no longer there.

Looking around at all the damage has filled me with a great sadness and I wasn't all that motivated to continue the journal the past two months. Now that things are returning to normal, I'll be back to updating regularly. So until the next update, we here at the shore remain Jersey Strong !

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Jetty Jockey

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Well, most of my hurricane preparations are complete so I figure I'll update y'all on the situation here before I lose power. At the moment, the core of the hurricane is about 100 miles offshore, and is due to hit within 4 to 6 hours. Winds at the center have increased to 90 mph, making this a potentially devastating storm. The morning's high tide brought severe flooding to the barrier island communities, and the water has risen over the Garden State Parkway and all the causeways. Those left on the islands are pretty much stuck there for the duration. The onshore windflow has meant that the water levels did not recede with the falling tide. Tonight's high tide is about 8 pm, about the time of the storm's arrival. I'm on the mainland in Woodbine, so no danger of flooding here, but all our trees are still full of leaves and are top heavy. The center of the storm is expected to make landfall between Stone Harbor and Sea Isle City, tracking over Woodbine shortly thereafter. If it does, this will be second eye of a hurricane that I've been in, the other being Isabel (2003 I think.) Where exactly the center makes landfall is kind of a moot point, as destruction will extend for hundreds of miles on either side. This evening's tide is likely to push water levels 5 to 7 feet higher, especially if the center of the storm hits at high tide. After that, the wind will shift to the west, blowing the water out on the barrier islands, but then flooding the the Delaware Bay shore.. . To make things worse, this event will last another 36 hours before clearing out of the region

.

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There is a travel ban in place, so I'm unable to get out and get some pics, but there has been a wealth of great shots shared by my Facebook friends who have opted to ride out the storm on the islands.

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15 to 20 foot high waves in Cape May . (Photo by Kristen Moorby)

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JFK Boulevard in Sea Isle City

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These folks are headed for higher ground

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21st Street in Avalon

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96th Street in Stone Harbor

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I don't think anyone is taking the turn onto Ocean Drive (North Wildwood)

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Morey's Pier in Wildwood. The water's edge is usually at the end of the pier. It's not such a long walk to the water today.

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96th Street in Stone Harbor

REPLIES :

Thanks all for your well wishes and concerns ! I live in Woodbine , at an elevation of nearly 40 feet above sea level , so flooding isn't much of a concern here. As a matter of fact, the emergency evacuation shelter is located a few blocks east of here. My only concern is falling trees and wind damage. I do worry about my friends on the islands. I hope they're in multistory buildings. There could easily be 6 to 10 feet of water covering the islands if the storm surge comes in at high tide.

this is bad, i have heard about it in the news, that even NYC has to evacuate some people, here in the Netherlands was also a very big storm in 1953, like 1835 people in NL died, this storm, i hope it will not worse then what happened here.

It's as bad or worse than the '62 storm, but I think with today's technology, we're better prepared than they were 50 years ago.

Holy hurricanes, Batman! I hope that it's not going to be as terrifying and destructive as it looks at the moment. Batten down the hatches and stay safe and all!

I'm ready as I'm going to be. Spent the day making ice for when the power goes out , filling water jugs and replacing batteries in the things that need them. I've been through the "drill" enough times to have it down to a science.

Oh no.

Our sentiments exactly, well, maybe more like "Oh %$%^ !"

You know what this storm resembles? The 1991 Perfect Storm. Near Halloween time, possibility of mixing with winter storms, and large casualties... Now, there are indeed major differences between

Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Grace, (and I wasn't alive in 1991 to see the disaster) but they still seem similar.

The Perfect storm didn't really affect the Jersey Cape all that much. Some wind, some rain, and minor flooding. It came up the coast and sideswiped the region, like most of the past storms. It was here and gone before it could do much damage. This is the first one in recent memory that is coming in at a right angle to the coast, hitting us dead on.

It's going to be a rough one, for sure. Hope that Cape May doesn't suffer too much damage.

We've been through so many of these I hope that folks don't get too complacent. Every hurricane that comes close draws a flock of newsvans hyping the storm , and it's always been a bust. Now that it's the real deal, I hope folks take this seriously after 40 or so years of the newsies crying "wolf" . The wolf is truly at our door !

Stay safe Jetty! Hopefully no terraforming will be needed on your part.

Let's hope so ! The 1962 storm carved 6 blocks off the north end of Avalon, and the town of South Cape May now lies in about 20 feet of water after the double whammy of the 1938 and 1944 hurricanes. More recently , Hurricane Gloria took a row of beach houses and the land they sat on in Reed's Beach . It's one of the risks of living at the shore. The folks that live in the Midwest and have to deal with tornadoes, California has its earthquakes. You just do your best to get through it and rebuild.

I heard about the storm in the past few days, and I hope the flooding and the damages that follows will be minimal. I hope that nobody gets hurt. Your area is really in danger...

I'll watch the web for updates. Keep it up and stay safe! That is WAY more important than an update...

Oh, I know it. Governor Christie put it so well in his own blunt style - "Don't be stupid !" I plan on staying hunkered down until the word to be able to safely go out is given. After Gloria, there were downed power lines and weakened trees all over the place that caused more fatalities than the storm did.

Jetty Jockey

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Well, most of my hurricane preparations are complete so I figure I'll update y'all on the situation here before I lose power. At the moment, the core of the hurricane is about 100 miles offshore, and is due to hit within 4 to 6 hours. Winds at the center have increased to 90 mph, making this a potentially devastating storm. The morning's high tide brought severe flooding to the barrier island communities, and the water has risen over the Garden State Parkway and all the causeways. Those left on the islands are pretty much stuck there for the duration. The onshore windflow has meant that the water levels did not recede with the falling tide. Tonight's high tide is about 8 pm, about the time of the storm's arrival. I'm on the mainland in Woodbine, so no danger of flooding here, but all our trees are still full of leaves and are top heavy. The center of the storm is expected to make landfall between Stone Harbor and Sea Isle City, tracking over Woodbine shortly thereafter. If it does, this will be second eye of a hurricane that I've been in, the other being Isabel (2003 I think.) Where exactly the center makes landfall is kind of a moot point, as destruction will extend for hundreds of miles on either side. This evening's tide is likely to push water levels 5 to 7 feet higher, especially if the center of the storm hits at high tide. After that, the wind will shift to the west, blowing the water out on the barrier islands, but then flooding the the Delaware Bay shore.. . To make things worse, this event will last another 36 hours before clearing out of the region

.

SandyMon1400.jpg

There is a travel ban in place, so I'm unable to get out and get some pics, but there has been a wealth of great shots shared by my Facebook friends who have opted to ride out the storm on the islands.

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15 to 20 foot high waves in Cape May . (Photo by Kristen Moorby)

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North of JFK Boulevard in Sea Isle City

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These folks are headed for higher ground

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21st Street in Avalon

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96th Street in Stone Harbor

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I don't think anyone is taking the turn onto Ocean Drive (North Wildwood)

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Morey's Pier in Wildwood. The water's edge is usually at the end of the pier. It's not such a long walk to the water today.

REPLIES :

Thanks all for your well wishes and concerns ! I live in Woodbine , at an elevation of nearly 40 feet above sea level , so flooding isn't much of a concern here. As a matter of fact, the emergency evacuation shelter is located a few blocks east of here. My only concern is falling trees and wind damage. I do worry about my friends on the islands. I hope they're in multistory buildings. There could easily be 6 to 10 feet of water covering the islands if the storm surge comes in at high tide.

this is bad, i have heard about it in the news, that even NYC has to evacuate some people, here in the Netherlands was also a very big storm in 1953, like 1835 people in NL died, this storm, i hope it will not worse then what happened here.

It's as bad or worse than the '62 storm, but I think with today's technology, we're better prepared than they were 50 years ago.

Holy hurricanes, Batman! I hope that it's not going to be as terrifying and destructive as it looks at the moment. Batten down the hatches and stay safe and all!

I'm ready as I'm going to be. Spent the day making ice for when the power goes out , filling water jugs and replacing batteries in the things that need them. I've been through the "drill" enough times to have it down to a science.

Oh no.

Our sentiments exactly, well, maybe more like "Oh %$%^ !"

You know what this storm resembles? The 1991 Perfect Storm. Near Halloween time, possibility of mixing with winter storms, and large casualties... Now, there are indeed major differences between

Hurricane Sandy and Hurricane Grace, (and I wasn't alive in 1991 to see the disaster) but they still seem similar.

The Perfect storm didn't really affect the Jersey Cape all that much. Some wind, some rain, and minor flooding. It came up the coast and sideswiped the region, like most of the past storms. It was here and gone before it could do much damage. This is the first one in recent memory that is coming in at a right angle to the coast, hitting us dead on.

It's going to be a rough one, for sure. Hope that Cape May doesn't suffer too much damage.

We've been through so many of these I hope that folks don't get too complacent. Every hurricane that comes close draws a flock of newsvans hyping the storm , and it's always been a bust. Now that it's the real deal, I hope folks take this seriously after 40 or so years of the newsies crying "wolf" . The wolf is truly at our door !

Stay safe Jetty! Hopefully no terraforming will be needed on your part.

Let's hope so ! The 1962 storm carved 6 blocks off the north end of Avalon, and the town of South Cape May now lies in about 20 feet of water after the double whammy of the 1938 and 1944 hurricanes. More recently , Hurricane Gloria took a row of beach houses and the land they sat on in Reed's Beach . It's one of the risks of living at the shore. The folks that live in the Midwest and have to deal with tornadoes, California has its earthquakes. You just do your best to get through it and rebuild.

I heard about the storm in the past few days, and I hope the flooding and the damages that follows will be minimal. I hope that nobody gets hurt. Your area is really in danger...

I'll watch the web for updates. Keep it up and stay safe! That is WAY more important than an update...

Oh, I know it. Governor Christie put it so well in his own blunt style - "Don't be stupid !" I plan on staying hunkered down until the word to be able to safely go out is given. After Gloria, there were downed power lines and weakened trees all over the place that caused more fatalities than the storm did.

Jetty Jockey

Storm Warning

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Hello all. As I write this, Cape May County is again in the crosshairs of a hurricane.

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Tropical Storm Sandy is predicted to strengthen to hurricane force before striking Cape May County's beaches. Unlike past storms, which sideswiped the region on thier way north, this one is hitting the region dead on. The slow moving storm, which is has been described as a hurricane wrapped in a nor'easter, will pound the county for three days with high winds, heavy rains and catastrophic flooding. 15 to 25 foot waves on top of the storm surge will batter the barrier islands for several days.

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Mandantory evacuations have all ready been ordered for the most of the county and are proceeding . Experts are predicting this to be the most damaging storm to strike Cape May since the legendary 1962 nor'easter.

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Due to the extended duration of the event, flooding is expected to be the same as that of a category 2 hurricane. Basically, all the light blue and dark blue shaded areas will be submerged under several feet of water.

We're still hoping the storm tracks further north, as the right front quadrant of the storm is the strongest part. Should this happen, winds will shift to the west sooner, blowing the water away from the cape

YouTube home video shot after the '62 storm, showing Cape May and Wildwood:

Atlantic City Electric has already notified us that power is likely to be out for over a week. Hopefully, I'll have an update ready to post by then. I may have to re-terraform the region, depending on how much the coastline changes.

Jetty Jockey

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Time for another reality check, this time looking at Middle Township and Seven Mile Beach Island.

< CLICK ON PICS FOR LARGER IMAGE >

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Satellite view .

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Sim version, western Middle Township

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Eastern Middle and Seven Mile Beach Island.

REPLIES :

Hmm, do not like the eating muskrat business

Everything else looks really great, though. Love how organic the layout is.

I haven't sampled it yet. I hear it's an acquired taste. Mostly, muskrat are trapped for thier pelts. From an ecological view, I guess it's a good thing that they don't waste the rest of the animal

.

Very interesting update once again, but that goes without saying. I'm following along well enough, but would you be so kind as to clarify where the captions are for each picture? Is it caption

then picture? Or is it picture then caption? Sometimes I'm a little confused and everyone does it differently here.

The format I use is picture then caption. Hovever, I usually throw an intro line in after the header. Maybe that's what's throwing you off.

A Bud with the crikkers sounds like fun to me. I like the salt petrified trees, and using the maxis scrub brush along the treeline makes for a smooth transition between trees and marsh. Great update!

A Bud and a clamshell pitch ( sort of like horseshoes, but ony using surf clam shells) is good crikker fun. A few too many Buds can lead to cow tipping , so be careful. Those farmers wouldn't think twice about shooting you with a load of rock salt.

Nice Region View! Looks so realistic like a satellite view keep up the good work!

That reminds me I haven't done a reality check in a while. Thanks for the reminder .

Loved the very rational notion that salt water kills fresh water tree roots And you have created that believeable in SC4, way to go!

As more development draws groundwater from the aquifers, it gets replaced by salt water from the ocean and bay. A lot of folk had to have thier wells redug to reach fresh water. Not just the roots are killed by salt water. In the great hurricane of 1821 ( an estimated category 3-4 storm along the lines of Katrina) , salt spray driven by hurricane winds killed the leaves on the east side of trees as far as 10 miles inland.

Jetty Jockey

2 - 26 : Crikkers

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In today's update we return to the Delaware Bayshore.

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This is a rural section of western Middle Township, between Dias Creek ( pronounced by the locals as Dye-az Crick ) and Green Creek (Green Crick). The inhabitants of this area are referred to as "Crikkers" by uppity folks from the islands and other more ""civilized" areas of the county , a term meaning "hick" or "redneck". They are a simple folk; farmers, trappers, fishermen, and tradesmen who spend most of thier workday outdoors . Crikkers would rather drink a Budweiser than sip a well chilled Chardonnay, and you can find muskrat on the menu at the local church covered dish dinner. You may even find an old toilet on the front lawn being used as a flower planter by the more creative inhabitants of the area.

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First up is Pierce's Point, a tiny bayside community nestled in the dunes between Delaware Bay and the marshes behind them.

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Looking west over Pierce's Point. The even tinier community of High's Beach lies south. (left)

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Dias Creek twists its way through the marshes north of town. It is too shallow and narrow to be navigable by boats.

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Further upstream is the Potato Island tile. Dias Creek is crossed by NJ Route 47 ( Delsea Drive) . Springer's Mill Road ( northern east-west road) connects to Cape May Court House , while Indian Trail (southern road) heads to North Wildwood via Burleigh.

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South of Springer's Mill Road , a series of small connected ponds forms the source of Dias Creek. Called Pennsylvania Ponds, it is a wild area of Middle Township.

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South of Potato Island, Route 47 passes through the Kay Pond tile. This section of Middle Township between Green Creek and Dias Creek could be called part of either , depending on who you talk to. I named it for Kay Pond, a terrain feature east of Delsea Drive. The headwaters of Green Creek slowly flow along the tile's southern border. This area was featured in the opening teaser of the journal, and has seen much improvement ( notably SPAM farms) since it was first seen two years ago.

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As stated earlier in the journal, salt water intrusion into the previously fresh water creeks has killed off many of the trees along the banks of many of these creeks.

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Salt petrified trees along the banks of Green Creek.

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Visitors to Cape May County's beaches in the summer are familiar with the banner planes that fly up and down the coast. These "flying billboards" tow ads for local restaurants , events , and an occasional wedding proposal.

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Operated by Paramount Air Services, these planes fly from a grass and dirt strip west of Route 47. The young pilots ( most in thier early twenties) gain valuable experience logging flight hours towing banners over the beach resorts.

Well, that's all I have for this update. I hope you've enjoyed it. As always, questions, comments, and requests are more than welcome, they're encouraged ! Thanks for viewing.

-JJ-

Jetty Jockey

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Wow, so many replies to the Stone Harbor update! I really do appreciate the feedback. Rather than take up space in the next update, which should be ready later in the weekend, I'll answer them here. While ya read, You can listen to "On the Way to Cape May". Written in 1961 by Buddy Nugent, the tune circulated from one band to another around Cape May County in the second half of the 20th Century. It became regionally popular when Al Alberts recorded it and increased its broadcast exposure on radio and TV. The lyrics are about a love story and journey which begins with the intro mentioning Ocean City. Traveling southward, the lyrics then continue with mentions of Sea Isle; Avalon; Stone Harbor; Wildwood coming into view and talks of marriage around the town of Cape May Court House. The words never actually say anything about the town of Cape May. And though that town is the target destination, it's more about a journey through Cape May County. It's still a popular sing-along at local bars and gets played on Philadelphia area oldies stations during the summer months.

(source : Wikipedia)

Benedict wrote :

I love the densely populated area along the coast - great recreation as always.

Glad you like it. The beach is a major draw in this area, and that's where the people (and Sims) want to be.

Simul8ter8 wrote:

Lovely recreation! Definitely missed this when I was gone.

Welcome back !

grstudios wrote :

Another good post!

Thank you !

Jacob Guajardo wrote:

Very good

Thanks!

hammysonata wrote:

Great work once again! It's always exciting to see how you've gone about recreating the region

Thanks ! I'm still having fun doing it, and that's the point, right?

MilitantRadical wrote:

Really great stuff, love the terrain you're working on and what you're doing with it.

Thank you . The terraforming got a bit tedious, but seems worth the effort now

ggamgus wrote :

Wow, this is so beautiful...

As for "bring your wallet",

*Don't got no money*

I believe the Stone Harbor Police consider that "probable cause". They can be somewhat <cough> oppressive. Not to worry though, Stone Harbor has one of the nicer holding cells in Cape May County.

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Kruness wrote :

i really love this, great job!

Thanks Kruness !

Mayorjacks wrote :

sick bro. really good job.

Thanks and welcome to my journal .

Hazani Pratama wrote :

Very Beautiful!

Glad you liked it.

SimCoug wrote :

Great downtown and hotel district - I'm amazed that you are able to build this within the confines of the maxis simulation - NAM is a big help, but you have such great swaths of single family houses and everybody has jobs. That can be tough to do, even without trying to recreate an actual RL region.

Building up an industrial base on the mainland , even a farm based one, is helping to keep the commercial demand on the islands going. It even has produced an unanticipated side effect that adds to the realism. The traffic that builds up on the causeways leading to the island resorts from sims returning from work on the mainland mirrors the traffic crush that occurs on summer weekends from folks trying to get to thier beach houses and hotels. After the season, the region suffers one of the worst unemployment rates in New Jersey, at times exceeding 25% due to a lack of year round jobs. Something to adress when I get to the third part of the journal.

NMUSpidey wrote :

That doesn't surprise me. Wouldn't want the view spoiled by the nouveau riche, after all.

Back to the entry at hand, it's pretty amazing. I like the street shots you have mixed in. The shops actually remind me a lot of home. Of course here in Japan, everything's so different that it's probably not that hard to remind me of the States.

Population density is a lot less here, I'd imagine. Even in one of the more densely populated states in the nation, there's still plenty of room to spread out.

Higu wrote :

This is a very good interpretation of SH! I love all the attention to the waterfronts both ocean and bay, and downtown. My only real gripe is that 2nd Av isn't a 4 lane avenue anymore. They reduced it to 2 with a bike lane now. I knew I was going to love this, just forgot about it for a few days

I had to make some concessions to the Maxis simulation in order to make things work. Otherwise, sims north of say, 75th street would be mired in a traffic mess and not be able to find work. Keeping it an avenue so my sims can find work allows the higher wealth buildings to develop. At one time the median of 2nd Avenue was the railbed of the South Jersey and Western RR. When I move into the third phase of the project ( applying my ideas of how to improve things) it may be once again !

Jetty Jockey

2-25 : Stone Harbor

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In today's installment we continue south along Seven Mile Beach Island to the town of Stone Harbor.

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Stone Harbor was undeveloped until the middle of the 19th century. The first building, an inn, was erected in 1891 near what is now 80th Street. Seven cottages formed the original resort. It is claimed that the name came from an English seaman, Captain Stone, who sought refuge here during a storm. In 1907, the dunes were leveled and the marshes filled in, and basins were dredged from land adjacent to the Intracoastal Waterway. An 846 foot deep artesian well was dug for a supply of fresh water. As far back as 1889, the railway from Avalon was extended south , and until 1911 this was the only way to access the town until the causeway and bridge from Cape May Court House was completed. Stone Harbor was incorporated from portions of Middle Township on April 3, 1914. Today, Stone Harbor, like its northern neighbor Avalon, is a quiet, upscale resort community .

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Stone Harbor is seperated from the mainland by Great Channel, part of the Intracoastal Waterway system that connects Great Sound (off map, northwest) to Hereford Inlet (off map, south).

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Looking south across downtown. Most of Stone Harbor's business district is centered on 96th Street.

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Quaint shops and upscale restaurants line 96th Street.

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Downtown, looking west.

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The "hotel district" around 80th street, site of the original inn on the island.

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Basins north of the bridge between 81st and 92nd Street include ( north to south) North Basin, South Basin, and Snug Harbor.

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Bayside properties here cost in excess of 1 million dollars. In 2006, Forbes magazine listed Stone Harbor as # 47 on its list of most expensive zip codes in the United States.

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Stone Harbor's oceanfront beach was ranked as the tenth best beach in New Jersey in 2008. You'll need to purchase a beach tag to gain access.

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More basins south of the bridge. North to South are Shelter Harbor, Stone Harbor, and Carnival and Pleasure Bay

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On the western side of the 96th Street Bridge is the Stone Harbor Yacht club.

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Further west on Stone Harbor Boulevard is the Wetlands Institute. (looking south) . Founded in 1969, the Institute sits on 6000 acres of protected wetlands and hosts educational tours and courses.and serves as a base for research on wetlands ecology. Guided tours of the nature trail get visitors up close and personal with the diverse varieties of wildlife that inhabit Cape May County's tidal marshes.

Well, that's all I have for now. Thanks for stopping by ! I hope you've enjoyed your visit. As always, comments, questions, suggestions and requests are appreciated and encouraged !

REPLIES

cool

Thanks, Kruness

The noght shot looks lovely...

Glad you like it. The islands, being more densely populated, have more lights at night and show up a lot better

WOW! Looks great!

Thank you !

Cooler by a mile, huh? Now I wanna go there!

Bring your wallet. Stone Harbor isn't a place to go on a budget

I like the mansions hidden away in the trees and the beach access trails just add to the realism. That far zoom at night is a keeper - I like the stark difference from the developed area and the wetlands.
Bing Maps gives me the tools to pick out the little details. If I had tried to do some fact finding on foot, I would have ended up in the Stone Harbor city jail.

Very beautiful! Me gusta! This is going well for you

Gracias !

Incredible region view, as always! Love the Great Sound photo too

Thanks ! It keeps looking better as the region fills out

Love the update! Great coadtal scne!

Which water mod did you use here? It seems like my favorite...!

Thank you. I use the Brigantine water mod. It goes real well with the Columbus terrain mod.

Heh, those pesky treehuggers, I tell ya. Still, I am definitely looking forward to seeing what you have planned!

Many of the environmentalists are wealthy folk that already have homes on the island. I find it ironic that that they try to deny to others what they've already done to the land.

What an amazing water city

It looks like a modern Venice, except I don't like Venice much.

But this city (both the real life and the game versions) looks very nice

Thanks ! It's much smaller than Venice, and doesn't have raw sewage in the water. The beach towns take thier water quality seriously. They post weekly updates from the Department of Environmental Protection about the quality of the water on thier bathing beaches. A poor grade means the tourists ( and thier money) will go elsewhere.

Jetty Jockey

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In today's update we continue south along Seven Mile Beach Island to the upscale resort of Avalon. < CLICK ON PICS FOR A LARGER VERSION>

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The island was originally covered by a thriving juniper forest, and used by the Lenni-Lenape for fishing. In 1722, Aaron Leaming purchased the land for 79 pounds, 10 shillings. It was used for grazing cattle and harvesting timber, and was uninhabited for over 100 years due to a lack of a fresh water supply. It is rumored that Captain Kidd and other pirates used the barrier islands to bury thier treasures. The Leaming family owned and retained the island for over 100 years, eventually selling it in the mid 1800s. Ownership changed hands a few times and by 1887, the Seven Mile Beach Company purchased the island , cut down the juniper forest and leveled the dunes, essentially making it flat. Avalon was incorporated as a borough from sections of Middle Township on April 18, 1892. As early as 1893, Avalon, named for the mythical island in Arthurian legend, was being advertised as a resort town.. The island developed rapidly, and in the early 1900s , the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad completed a bridge over Townsend's Inlet and extended thier Sea Isle City line south to Avalon and Stone Harbor. The railroad was the preferred method of travel to the island until the mid 1930's , when increased automobile use forced the WJ&S to end service to much of Cape May County. Today, Avalon is one of the most affluent communities on the Jersey Shore. In 2007, Forbes Magazine listed Avalon as the 65th most expensive zip code in the United States. Sports stars, televison personalities, CEOs, and country music singers are among those that have a vacation property in Avalon.

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Avalon's slogan is "Cooler by a Mile". This comes from the fact that the northern end of Seven Mile Beach Island extends a mile further out into the ocean than the other barrier islands. Sea breezes in summer keep the islands a few degrees cooler than the mainland, and up to 10 to 15 degrees cooler than the urban areas 50 miles west of the coast. Conversely, in winter, warmer ocean temperatures keep the coast a bit warmer than inland areas. When snow falls on the mainland, it is often rain or sleet on the islands.

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Avalon is seperated from the mainland by Ingram Thorofare, part of the Intracoastal Waterway. Ocean Drive ( County Road 619) connects to Stone Harbor in the south and Sea Isle City via the Townsend's Inlet Bridge to the north. Avalon Boulevard ( County Road 601) enters the town at 30th Street and provides Avalon's only connection to the mainland, linking up with the Garden State Parkway at exit 13.

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The Old Avalon causeway (top road) runs along the southern bank of South Channel and had formerly entered the city at 21st Street. It had been replaced by a newer causeway (southern road) that now enters the island at 30th Street.

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With the completion of the new causeway in the mid 20th century, the 21st Street Bridge was removed. Old Avalon Boulevard now dead ends at the Avalon Manor section of Middle Township.

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Western sections of town, built on the tidemarsh before environmental regulations prohibited development of the wetlands. Avalon Channel is crossed by small bridges at (top to bottom) 21st Street, 24th Street, and 30th Street. This little island is flanked by Pennsylvania Harbor to the north and Princeton Harbor to the south.

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The view south from the 21st Street Bridge.

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Avalon's waterfront is some of the priciest in Cape May County. Homes here are in the seven figure range.

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Most of Avalon's business district is along Dune Drive. Chic shops and upscale restaurants cater to thier wealthy clientele.

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Avalon's public beaches are in the northern parts of the city. For a fee, one can share the beach with Avalon's rich and famous. Washingtonian magazine said of Avalon's beach " It's where one can go to see women in diamonds and designer swimwear on the beach"

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Avalon's beaches suffer greatly from erosion due to passing hurricanes and winter storms. Not to worry. By the time the summer season begins, an expensive beach replenishment program will have the beaches restored.

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Further south, 42nd Street extends west into the tidemarsh. Here is the Lagoon section of the town.

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Same area, looking north.

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Continuing south, a section of the original dune line and maritime forest has been preserved. This part of Avalon has some of the highest dunes on the Jersey Shore, and protects the western sections of the island from coastal storms.

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In a town with high property values, this part of town has the highest. Complete with a private ocean beach, some of the dune mansions here are valued at over ten million dollars.

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In recent years, this section of Avalon has become a battleground in the ongoing war between developers and environmentalists.

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And finally, a shot of the island at night, looking west towards Great Sound (top, left)

Well, that's all I have for now. Thanks for viewing, and a special thanks for those who have taken the time to leave a comment. They are very much appreciated !

REPLIES :

Good.

Thanks !.

You should take your vision of the solutions to a regional planning board meeting and see what they say. Should make for a few interesting follow-up posts, at least.

The environmental lobby would run me out of the county once they saw what I have planned :| One of my top priorities would be the completion of the Cape May Freeway ( NJ 55) south to its planned junction with the Garden State Parkway south of exit 13. This would ease the traffic nightmare on Route 47 that occurs every summer weekend, as well as give a better evacuation route in the event of a major hurricane. The tree huggers killed this project in the 1970s, and have resisted any attempt to revive it. As a result, Route 55 is a highway to nowhere, ending in a rural section of Cumberland County, 15 miles northwest of Dennisville.

I like your use of the nbvc riprap - it looks just like the RL picture :)

By incorporating more MMPs, I think you definitely add to the realism of the recreation - each entry is getting better.

Thanks SimCoug! Your earlier advice and encouragement to add more ploppaples is paying off. It's no NewSorGun, but it's a lot better than I had originally planned for when I thought it was going to be a basically Sim-vanilla journal. I'm still limited to what's on the ST exchange ( no luck trying to access the LEX), so I'm doing the best with the tools that are available to me.

Each update is twice as epic as the one before. :P

Great work. :D

Thanks ggamgus! This journal is as much a documentation of the learning process as it is a showcase for my SC skills. I try to learn something new with each entry and work it in. Things will get a bit more interesting the further south we go on the Cape. Re-creating the resort communities of the Wildwoods ( with its boardwalk and amusement piers ) and Cape May , with all its Victorian charm are two major challenges that I am already beginning to plan for. Should be fun !.

Nice job!

I am yet to become as versed as you have with using the riprap walls... :)

The riprap walls were easy. I used PEG's ploppable shoreline textures. All I had to do was select riprap and paint it in along the coast. Easy, just the way I like it.

Really great attention to detail and real life context, what I love about ur CJ.

The region has a lot of history, and I'm happy to pass that on. TV Shows like Jersey Shore give a distorted portrayal of the region, and I'm glad I can get a chance to set the record straight. I've lived here all my life, and as stated earlier, this is my third attempt to recreate the region in SC4 ( 5th if you count the attempts I made using SC2K and SC3K. Since SC2013 will more than likely not allow us to continue this, I'm looking at this as my last shot.

Looking good.

Thanks sHnozZa ! Glad you like it

How did I miss your CJ? :) Shame on me.

You have earned your ben's-top-ten rank fairly, since you recreated those towns so accurately...

You do use Maxis a lot, but it dosen't damage the CJs style. But way to go! Making maxis towns look so original is seen seldom in here.

I love the wooden short piers, in the last picture - Are they from the PLEX?

To sum this review up - I would start to follow you from now on. :thumb: 5/5 +1

Welcome aboard ! Shame on you indeed, but better late than never ! I have nothing against the Maxis buildings. They're well lotted, and fairly represent the architecture of the region. By adding the RLS series, it adds a bit of diversity to my residential areas. If a building gets too redundant ( I've had entire blocks of identical Maxis houses and that really irked me) , I simply make what I want to stay historic and then go in with my trusty bulldozer and thin out the herd , so to speak. The small docks are nbvc piers ( available here):

Again, thanks for stopping by. Hope to see you again !

Jetty Jockey

2-23: Townsend's Inlet

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In today's update , we move back offshore to the Townsend's Inlet tile.

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Townsend's Inlet seperates Ludlam's Beach Island from Seven Mile Beach Island. On the northern shore is the Townsend's Inlet section of Dennis Township. South of the inlet is the northermost section of the incorporated borough of Avalon. Ocean Drive ( County Road 619) connects to Sea Isle City to the north and to downtown Avalon to the south. There are no connections to the mainland from this tile.

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Aerial view of Townsend's Inlet, the town (looking south).

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Sim version, also looking south.

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Built in 1939, the Ocean Drive Bridge over Townsend's Inlet links the two islands. The bridge is aging and has some structural issues. While being repaired in 2009, a barge doing the repair work was diven into the bridge by the high winds of a winter nor'easter. The bridge was further damaged, forcing it to be closed even longer.

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North end of Avalon, looking east . Grace O'Brien Park occupies the center of the island from 8th Street to 12th Street. An upscale marina is conveniently located to access the Intracoastal Waterway , the inlet, and the ocean.

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Same area from 6th Street to 11th Street. The streets had previously run to 1st Street, but the Ash Wednesday Noreaster of 1962 changed the landscape. For three days, hurricane force winds drove 30 foot waves on to the island, submerging it for four days. When the flood waters finally receded, six blocks of the northern part of the island were gone, washed into the Atlantic.

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A rock seawall was built on the northern end of the island to attempt to stabilize the shoreline. Between that, annual beach replenishment ( sand is pumped in from the ocean bottom offshore to build up the beach), and an artificial reef system, Avalon's shorelines have remained fairly stable, but at a high cost to taxpayers.

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Seawall, looking northwest towards the bridge.

Finally, I'll leave you with a mosaic of Ocean Drive from 81st Street in Townsend's Inlet to 12th Street in Avalon.

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As always, comments, questions, requests are more than welcome...they're encouraged ! Want to see something in more detail? Just ask !

REPLIES.

Another excellent update. :)

BTW, I hadn't even seen Vivapanda's link. I was referring to the bird's eye view in the game. That regional view looks SO MUCH like real-life Cape May County. :D

Thanks ! I'll probably be doing another "Reality Check" update once I finish Seven Mile Beach Island.

I love the road through the wetlands - reminds me of similar places along the North Carolina coast where I've visited. Great recreations once again - and I laughed at your 'finding truck' pic - cheers to spying on oneself with satellites.

I thought it was pretty funny too. I looked for my truck at home in Woodbine, but didn't see it. So that's where It was!

Really really love the Scotch Bonnet photos-- so unique!

It's an interesting part of the county, one of the last remaining developments in the wetlands. There once was a similar settlement in Grassy Sound, along the North Wildwood causeway, but it was bulldozed when they upgraded that road to a 4 lane.

So amazing

I'm glad you liked it ! Thanks !.

Cool again!

At my parents' house in SE MI, they have an updated satellite image on Google Earth where you can see my old Subie parked out front. There was a winter image of my old apartment in Toledo (it's different now) where you could see my even older Impreza wagon in the driveway. I love finding myself on Google Earth. All the great stuff we can do, and we all look to see if we can see ourselves hahahah!

I'm becoming a fan of Google Earth. I only hope they expand thier street view to include much of the county that they're missing.

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I love all the little docks on the back of the houses. very nice

Thank you ! Nearly all the waterfront homes and businesses have a dock of some sort. Considering the traffic snarl that the region's roads can be in the summer, it's often a faster ( and more scenic) way to get around. When I get to phase 3 of the journal ( my vision of improving the problems I've seen living here all my life) I'm considering establishing a water taxi service to utilize the region's many waterways.

Jetty Jockey

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Hello ! In today's update we will be looking at Middle Township east of Cape May Court House

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East of Court House are the Scotch Bonnet, Benny's Landing, and Shellbay landing tiles. This is one of the few locations in the county where development has infringed upon the tidemarsh.

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The Scotch Bonnet section of Middle Township is a collection of homes lining the side of the Stone Harbor causeway. The roadbed is raised a few feet above the tidal marsh to make it accessible during higher tides. The area takes its name from Scotch Bonnet Creek, south of the causeway. In the late 1800's , a cross county canal was proposed from Stone Harbor to Delaware Bay via Scotch Bonnet Creek and Bidwell's Creek . Dredging was begun from the eastern end, but an economic depression in the 1880s caused a lack of funding and the project was abandoned before the canal could even reach Cape May Court House.

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(Looking east) Today, homes and a few businesses lay mostly on the south side of the causeway. Raised wooden pathways lead to docks along the banks of the old Stone Harbor canal, which offers docking for small craft. Over the years mud has caused the canal to shoal, making the canal passable to larger craft only at high tide.

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Most of the homes in this area are built on pilings to keep them a few feet above the marshes, which flood during the higher tides of the new and full moon phases.

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Looking east on Stone Harbor Boulevard.

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Scotch Bonnet Creek and salt marsh north of the causeway.

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East of Cape May Court House, about a mile south of the causeway, is Benny's Landing. A small knot of homes huddle in the marsh along the western shore of Jenkins Sound.

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As with most structures built in the tidemarsh, the homes are raised on pilings.

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A little south of Benny's Landing is Shellbay Landing. The tile is uninhabited, but the Township of Middle provides a pier here for fishing, crabbing, or just relaxing. It's a pleasant little place to take a lunch break.

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Here's a mosaic of Stone Harbor Boulevard, headeding east through Scotch Bonnet.

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I'll leave you with a YouTube video from the "Roads of Cape May County" collection. This is Stone Harbor Boulevard from the Garden State Parkway to downtown Stone Harbor.

As always, thanks for stopping by and many thanks for your comments !

REPLIES :.

Nice job! The mosaics are my favs.

Thanks ! They're my favs too :D .

Really, really like the terraforming in the region view :)

Thank you ! It's really shaping up now that there's some development on it..

So much detail in that region view, nice.

Thanks ! It's the result of 18 months worth of terraforming, documented in Section 1, the first 19 entries of the journal.

Another excellent update. I had to google the Middle Township Performing Art Center. Sadly, it looks a little different in real life, but I don't know if there are any STEX or LEX buildings that would match up with the real thing. Those weird-angle roads are cool and remind me so much of home. There is absolutely a distinct look that much of America (suburban America, especially) has.

Yeah, my choices were pretty limited. It was either that or the opera house reward, which I felt was too small. Hey, Middle Township can dream. One day they might want a big fancy PAC if it develops. Thanks for the comment!

Those FAR roads look great in those mosaics! And I love the little downtown - very quaint. Any good pubs? You also did a good job with the mining area and the MMPs. Looking forward to the next installment.

Yeah, the FAR roads work great in a mosaic. The straight ones and even the 45 degree ones ran off the screen after a while. Most of the night life is on the barrier islands, but Cape May Court House is home to 2 pubs. The Bellvue Tavern, located on Main Street a little south of Mechanic Street, and Atkinson's Tavern, also on Main, south of Shell Bay Avenue. I'm partial to the Bellvue. but I'm biased. They sign my pay check :D .

http://binged.it/NKosTe

Okay, this is just perfect :OThe effort you put in this is unrivaled!

Thank you, and thanks for the link. Equally perfect. Y'know, I was even able to find my truck in the municipal parking lot :golly:

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Dis haz bin... an excellent update. :P

I love the satellite image. Looks just like the real life Cape May Court House. :O

Thankz very much! I loved it too. Vivapanda went above and beyond the call of duty with that reply , posting the Bing link.

Brilliant. I love the FAR rail line.

Thanks, and thank you for including my journal in this week's Top 10. I'm honored !

Nice sprawl you have going here and you've made good use of the FAR as well. A suggestion if I may though, when taking pictures turn on shadows and traffic, you'll probably get a bit of a peformance hit but the extra depth the shadows add to the scenes is worth it.

Thank you. I'm always receptive to tips from a skilled journalist. I did have traffic on high, but shadows were only set to medium. I took your advice for this update and things look better. I don't worry too much about a performance hit. I lower my settings while building, then set them to high for the screen shots. I really do need to upgrade my video card sometime soon, tho. I get an occasional crash to desktop when running too many high end applications at once. Nothing serious, but annoying.

Jetty Jockey

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Hello and happy Labor Day ! In today's update we will be visiting the town of Cape May Court House in Middle Township. Grab a snack and settle in, as this is a fairly lengthy update :) <CLICK ON PICS FOR LARGER IMAGES>

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Cape May Court House is the county seat of Cape May County, and the center of government for both the county and the township of Middle. In 1695, prominent whaler Shagmar Hand purchased over 1100 acres of land from the West Jersey Society. After the first survey by Shagmar's nephew Jeremiah, the land was named Romney Marsh, for the "fertile fields of Kent County, England, the ancestral home of the Hands". In the early 1700s, the town's name was changed to the more geographically correct Middletown, being as it was located in the middle of Cape May County. At that time, the county's business was conducted from first Baptist church built in the region ( built in 1715) . In 1774, Daniel Hand, Shagmar's grandson and a master builder, donated an acre of land and built the courthouse and jail upon it.(*1) In the early 1800s, the first post office was established and the town's name was officially changed to Cape May Court House. By 1833, the wooden structure of the first courthouse had fallen into a sad state of disrepair, and the county had decided to build a new brick courthouse. This set off a lengthy and at times bitter debate. The prosperous shipbuilding towns of Dennis Creek ( Dennisville) and Goshen wanted the additional prosperity that having the center of the county's government in thier towns would bring. Dr. John Wiley , a Court House physician, campaigned for retaining the Cape May Court House site. "Now , shall we voluntarily assume additional debt and increase our taxes threefold for the sole purpose of destroying one place and increasing the importance of another? Let us leave the villages of Cape May Court House and Dennis Creek to take care of themselves, while we take care of the county, and look to her interest rather than to individuals; and this can best be done by keeping out of debts and excercising economy". Wiley's appeal struck a nerve with the frugal voters, particularly those of Lower Township. On April 25, 1848, an astounding 1003 out of 1005 registered county voters cast ballots that gave Cape May Court House a narrow 89 vote edge over Dennis Creek. The new courthouse opened for its first meeting of the Cape May County Board of Chosen Freeholders in 1850. *(2)

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Cape May Court House (simply Court House by the locals) is the county's road hub. US 9 ( called Main Street as it passes through Court House) and the Garden State Parkway are the main north-south arteries. Other roads branch out likes spikes on a wheel and are for the most part conveniently named for thier destination .Clockwise from the top, Goshen Road (CR 615) heads off northwest while Dennisville Road goes north. Where it intersects US 9, Dennisville Road (CR 657) becomes Stone Harbor Boulevard and continues east to that barrier island resort. South of Stone Harbor Boulevard, also heading east are Benny's Landing Road and Shellbay Landing Road. Southbound, the two main roads are flanked by Golf Club Road , just east of the Parkway, and Shunpike Road (CR 620), a little west of Route 9. Connections to the west are provided by Dias Creek Road (CR 612) and Hand Avenue (CR 658) north of it. As you can see, most of the farmland has fallen to the developer's bulldozers, replaced by housing developments.

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Downtown, looking west across Main Street down Mechanic Street. North of Mechanic Street are the Township Hall and County Courthouse. North of that is the old Baptist Church which was the colonial home of county government. Behind Township Hall is the main branch of the Cape May County Library , across the street from the Middle Township Police Department. A municipal parking lot off of Boyd Street provides ample parking for area businesses on Main and Mechanic Streets, and is the site of the township's annual Harvest Festival each October.

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Additional shopping can be found at Court House's two shopping malls, located on Dennisville Road a bit north of US 9. In this one is an Acme Markets, CVS, Radio Shack ,Marshall's , Staples and a bunch of smaller shops . Pier One Imports is located at the mall's eastern entrance.

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Looking east. Across the road is TJ Maxx, and Family Dollar. The Big Lots is in the process of moving into the abandoned SuperFresh store and is slated to open in 2013. If you get hungry from shopping, there's Nino's Pizza (one of the 43 Brothers of BAT pizza fame), a Donut Connection, and an Arby's .

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Located on the northeast corner of Main Street and Stone Harbor Boulevard is Cape Regional Medical Center, the region's only hospital.

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Also off Dennisville Road is the campus of Atlantic Cape Community College. Originally Atlantic Community college in Mays Landing, ( 25 miles north of Woodbine), the Cape May County campus opened in 1999 . In 2005 , a full service Cape May Court House campus opened. Prior to that, Cape May Countians had to travel out of the region to get a higher education. Adjacent to the college is the 4H Fairgrounds. Each July, they hold the county fair there, featuring equestrian competitions, a livestock auction, entertainment and plenty of farm fresh food.

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Behind the college, just off of Goshen Road is Future Mining, Inc., a mining and recycling operation. They specialize in wood waste, wood chips, tree parts, stumps, Recycling By Products, Mulch, I-5 Gravel, Concrete, Brick, and Asphalt. They'll recycle darn near anything. North of there is the Davies Sports Complex. There they hold various sports tournaments and invitationals for the local school district and amateur teams. Middle Township also holds thier 4th of July fireworks display there as well.

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"Your friends at exit 10" is the slogan of the Jersey Cape Auto Mall. Once competitors, the Burke Motor group and Kindle Ford have banded together to offer 850 cars of 15 brands. Here you can find Fords, Chevys, Dodge, GMC, Volkswagens and several others.

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East of the Parkway is the campus of Middle Township High School and the Middle Township Performing Art Center. Here, Cape May County sims can get a bit of culture by taking in a play, concert, or an occasional rock and roll show.

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The Middle Township Panthers football team plays at this field on West Pacific Avenue

Here's a north- south mosaic starting at the 4H Fairgrounds, heading south on Dennisville Road and turning south at Main Street

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..and a final mosaic, this one west to east on Dias Creek Road to Stone Harbor Boulevard

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Well, that's all I have for this installment. I hope you've enjoyed it. Thanks for viewing, and thank you for your comments. !

Footnotes and sources

*1 "The Town Named after a Building" by Susan Tischler

*2 "Cape May County, New Jersey: The Making of an American Resort Community" By Jeffery M. Dorwart

REPLIES :

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I must say, that is one of the most impressive region shots I have ever seen :)

Well thank you very much and welcome to my journal !.

totally agree, the region is awesome

Thank you Kruness. I'm glad you like it..

AMAZING! :O

lol. Thanks ggamgus.

Congrats on 100,000! I'm looking forward to the next update - I already like that old downtown feel. Bummer about your LEX trouble. Hope you get access soon.

I still haven't been able to register , keep running into that damn monkey. It would be nice to finally get the missing textures for some of the BATs I'm using. Maybe I'll go back and toch them up someday. It'll give me something to do when the journal has run its course..

I can't wait to see when you get done with Stone Harbor. I spend my summers there every year. Our house is on 90th between 2nd and 1st Av's

I have a few more things to finish up in the Court House area, then I'll be moving on to Seven Mile Beach Island. I need to complete the Scotch Bonnet tile ( the causeway between Court House and Stone Harbor) to connect the island to the region, as the Avalon causeway ( Stites Sound tile) is uninhabited except for a radio station and may cause commute problems. After that I'll start at the Townsend's Inlet tile and work my way south to Stone Harbor and Hereford Inlet. I may need to return to the mainland to create more jobs if the dreaded no-jobs zot s begin to trouble me. 4 more updates to Stone Harbor. Stay tuned !

Jetty Jockey

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Hello again. Work is ongoing on the Cape May Court House tile. At the moment it's about 60% complete. So while we wait, we'll visit the Crest Haven tile.

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East of the County Park is the Crest Haven section of Middle Township.

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Located east of the Garden State Parkway at exit 11 , the Crest Haven Complex is home to several of the county's agencies and utilities.

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A trash to steam plant at the County Municipal Utilities Authority helps fulfill the county's waste disposal needs.

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Cape May Tech provides an educated work force for a non-polluting industry.

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The New Jersey National Guard's 253rd Transport Company is based here. Recently returned from overseas duty, the 253rd also provides emergency aid to residents in times of disaster. To the right of the base is the Cape May County Jail and the Veterans Cemetary.

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The Crest Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center is home to some of the oldest residents of the region. Among the more cynical it is referred to as "God's Waiting Room"

Well, that's it for this installment. In case you didn't notice it in the first pic, the region has hit its first milestone . Cape May County is now home to over 100,000 sims,! :party:

I'll leave you with a teaser from my upcoming work on Cape May Court House. Here's a look west on Mechanic Street from its intersection with Main Street ( US 9). Stay tuned !

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REPLIES :

Cool city

Thanks !

Yeah, I went to school in Michigan's Upper Peninsula (the UP), and the flies up there are gigantic AND they bite. They're on the same level as mosquitoes, and although no other place I've lived has them, I believe they do exist in other locations.

The greenhead flies take annoying to a whole new level. They're up to an inch long, and unlike the smaller flies and mosquitoes, the wind doesn't keep them away.

That is a great little community zoo - It reminds me of the Madison WI zoo that I used to visit when I lived up there. The African safari section with the in-game wild animals is perfect :)

It took a few tries to get the right screenshot with the god mode animals. They'd wander through the fencing and out on to Route 9 before I could set up the shot :nyah: .

Looks fantastic, love the ponds here and there. The terrain you are working on has a lot of character, very realistic!

Thank you ! One thing we're not short of around here is water. Between the low elevations and 35-40 inches of rain annualy, one doesn't have to go far to find water. The down side to that is high humidity. Hot and sticky in the summer and cool and damp in the winter..

That's is perfect :D

I'd love to go there :D

Thanks ! The region's main draws are the beaches and water activities. The park and zoo make a pretty good second choice when the weather doesn't allow a quality beach day.

By the way, I think it's great you are experimenting with MMPs. All I can say on that front - practice makes perfect. I will recommend one MMP that I could not do without: girafe's cattails (summer version)

They blend in nicely almost anywhere.

The cattails look incredible, and would do well as the phragmites found in the fresh water marshes on the lower cape. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to access the LEX. I keep running into that darned thinking monkey. I double and triple checked my password, and still haven't been able to figure it out. I'm hoping for help from the admins sometime soon. The site looks to be a treasure trove of good stuff..

Another great visit to Cape May.

Thanks Benedict !
Jetty Jockey

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In today's entry , we will be looking at the Cape May County Park tile in Middle Township

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Located in Middle Township just north of Cape May Court House, the Cape May County Park and Zoo cover about 220 acres of woodland, ponds, and marshes.

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Located between US Route 9 (easternmost north - south road) and Dennisville Road ( western FAR road, CR 657), this section of the county has been set aside for the recreation of residents and tourists alike. While there is some development along US 9 and a few homes along Dennisville Road, this section of the county is fairly undeveloped. To the north is the Stone Harbor Country Club. South of that is the County Park and Zoo.

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The Stone Harbor Country Club is a members only golf course.

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Cape May County Park, looking west. There is ample parking near the Dennisville Road entrance.

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Many trails meander through the park, offering a nice place for picnics and other family outings.

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There are extensive areas for the kiddies to play.

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The park extends east of Route 9 north of Crest Haven Road. There are tennis and basketball courts, and a softball field

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The lakeside gazebo is a popular place for wedding photos.

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The primary attraction of the Cape May County Park is its zoo. Built in 1978, it is one of the finest free zoos in the country. Over 250 species of animals are housed in 85

acres of exhibits. It features a free fight aviary (wear a hat !) , a reptile house and an African Savanna display. It is run by the Cape May County Zoological Society, a non profit partner of the county government. There is no admission, but donations are accepted for maintanence and feeding of the animals.

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One of the more popular exibits ( well, at least to Sim City fans) is the llamas. It's rumored that they actually run the place.

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One of the nicer sections of the zoo is 57 acre African Savanna display

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Zebras, giraffes, and other and other critters wander free about an extensive grassland. It's worth the long walk to the back of the zoo.

Well, that's it for this week's installment. Thanks for viewing, and your comments. They really mean a lot. I'll be working on Cape May Court House, the county seat next. It's a large tile that's fairly developed, so it may take a little while for the next update . Stay tuned !

REPLIES :

Great history lesson on the POW camp and the mosquito control dept. I imagine the mosquitoes in the early 1940s were not very kind to our war guests.

As for growing low wealth on high value land, yeah, that can be tricky. Overall, great update!

I would think the 90 + degree heat and oppressive humidity in the summer wouldn't have been all that pleasant for our northern European guests, even without the mosquitos. No air conditioning back then, and the bayside doesn't get much of a sea breeze. Thanks for the comment !

Looks good

Thanks !

Good Update!

Thank you !

I hate mosquitoes so much. Anything they can do to kill the little buggers off is fine with me!

The mosquitos aren't as bad as the flies. There is the greenhead fly, a vicious little monster that can draw blood with it's painful bite ( drawing even more pests) and the black fly : smaller, but just as annoying. Insect repellant seems to be just gravy for them. After a day of fishing on the bay beaches, a person has to literally run out of there once the sun sets.

Looks good. 5 stars from me

Thank you very much !

Jetty Jockey

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In today's posting, we continue our trek south along the Delaware Bayshore.

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Today's focus is on western Middle Township, in particular, the town of Dias Creek and Cook's and Kimble's Beach .

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NJ 47 runs north to south through Dias Creek, following the track of the colonial stagecoach route. In the late 1700s and early 1800s , development of Dennis Creek and Cape Island (Cape May) brought prosperity to the tiny bayshore towns in between them. One of these was Dyer's Creek ( renamed Dias Creek at a later time). In 1814, residents of Dyer's Creek met at the home of Daniel Cresse to form the Dyer's Creek Meadow Banking Company. The Company was set up to bank and drain thier wetlands and marshes using a system of dams, sluices, and floodgates. Several acres of wetlands were reclaimed , adding to the growth of this community. After the coming of the railroads, the county's focus was drawn eastward, and Dias Creek like many of the other bayshore communities, dwindled in importance.

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North end of Dias Creek. Hand Avenue (CR 658) crosses the headwaters of Skeeter Island Creek as it heads off eastward to Cape May Court House.

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Southern end of Dias Creek, looking west. Dias Creek Road (CR 612) also connects to Cape May Court House.

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Built in 1888, the Dias Creek UME church on Dias Creek Road is typical of the southern New Jersey churches of the period.

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West off of Route 47 is the Kimble's Beach tile. For the most part uninhabited marshland, it has been set up as a wildlife preserve. Kimble's Beach Road (southern road) heads to Kimble's Beach, and is paralelled to the north by Cook's Beach Road. While I haven't been able to find any documentation to confirm it, I believe Cook's Beach may have had a small development once. A ruined structure and remnants of a few foundations viewable at low tide lead me to believe theat a small village once existed here before it was claimed by erosion

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At the intersection of Cook's Beach Road and NJ 47 is the Cape May County Department of Mosquito Control. It was formerly known as the Mosquito Commission, and a local joke was that they were in charge of making sure there were enough mosquitos to go around. In the past few years the name was changed to give a clearer definition of thier mission . They've placed ditches in the marshlands, not to drain them but to give predatory fish access to mosquito breeding grounds. They also do spraying and educate the public on methods of keeping these pests under control. The site was a former WW II prisoner of war camp.

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At the end of Kimble's Road is the small knot of houses that make up Kimble's Beach.

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The view northward from Kimble's Beach. Reed's Beach ( see previous entry) is in the distance.

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In the spring, the bay beaches are closed due to the spawning season for horseshoe crabs. During the full and new moon phases in April and May, thousands of these creatures swarm on the Delaware Bay beaches to lay thier eggs. Migrating birds come to feast on the eggs, giving them enough nourishment to continue on to thier summer grounds in the Arctic. Called "a living fossil", these scary looking but harmless crabs have been around since before dinosaurs walked the earth, and are a vital link in the food chain. Overharvesting in recent years has led to their decline, and they are now classified as a protected species.

Well, that's all I have for this installment. Hope you've enjoyed it. As always, comments, questions, and suggestions are more than welcome: They're encouraged !

REPLIES :

Nice use of the FAR :) Add a nice variety of flora to the swamp and it'll look very authentic (I presume there is marsh flora, never had to use it myself)

Swamplands definately need loads of flora, this is the environment that trees and plants usually love, so they exploit it as they can.

But apart from that, dude, it's impressive. Nice use of the FAR and of diagonal streets, the way you work with the "canals" is incredible too. Really, really enjoyable to see.

Thanks guys. I've posted this in the last entry, but in case you may have missed it, I'm reposting again. I would agree that a fresh water marshand would hold a diversity of plant life, but this is not the case for the tidal marshes. They are at or inches above the high tide line, and are flooded twice daily with salt water from the ocean , which kills off most plant life. The flora in the tide marsh is predominantly cord grass and salt hay, two species that have a high salt tolerance.

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With increased development of the region , more fresh water is being pumped from the county's aquafiers. A resut of this is that the "salt line" ( the point where a stream or creek has a high enough salinity level to be considered brackish) has been advancing steadily upstream in recent years. A result of this has been the killing off of species that are salt intolerant, like this stand of salt petrified trees along the banks of Green Creek.

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Thanks for the input. As per your advice. I've gone and gotten a few MMP's that I've used in this posting, notably PEGs scrub bushes and other flora that I've used to highlight the edges of the salt marsh and areas where the salinity levels allow other types of flora to gain hold.

Great job once again! I love the use of PEG's buoys and the RL picture. As far as trying to get the right residential lots to grow, one trick I use is to sort the different custom content I download into the four different tilesets (Chicago, NY, Houston and Euro) using the ilives reader. Then, if you want a certain res building to grow, just select the correct building tileset in game, and you have greatly increased the chance that your building will grow. It may be a lot of work initially, but I think it is worth it in the end - especially after intense bulldozing sessions.

I use the tilesets to restrict the types of buildings available, but sometimes land values get too high before I can make the low wealth stuff historic, and if I don't pay attention, I get a trailer park full of Sheeza Brick Houses . I've been known to temporarily zone dirty industry in the heart of residential areas to depress land values so the low wealth stuff can develop. It's not going to get me many votes as Mayor of the Year, but if they don't like it, there's always the bulldoze option ( Muhahaha!)

Love the way you're threading the FARoads through the land.

Yeah, FAR makes it all happen here. Previous versions of the region had the roads zig-zagging thier way through the marshes, and that was something that really bugged me. I'm extremely pleased with the results that the FAR has allowed me to accomplish.

Jetty Jockey

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In today's update we return to the western shore of the county, focusing on the area around Reed's Beach.

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It is a sparsely populated section of Middle Township, comprised mostly of salt marsh and farmland.

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Heading south on NJ 47 from Goshen, the road crosses Bidwell's Creek. Upstream of the bridge the creek branches, with Bidwell's Creek heading east and Skeeter Island Creek turning south. Skeeter Island ( east of the creek) is a Federal Wildlife sanctuary and access is prohibited. About a mile south of the bridge, Reed's Beach road heads off westward to that tiny bayfront community.

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On the southern bank of the creek is Bayway Marina.

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The marina is one of the few that offer convenient access to the fine fishing on Delaware Bay as well as providing a sheltered harbor for transient boaters heading up the Delaware Bay.

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Looking west across Delsea Drive. Heading west on Reed's Beach Road takes one through a mile or so of woodlands and marsh to Reed's Beach.

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Reed's Beach is the northernmost of Cape May County's Delaware Bayfront communities. A handful of bungalows and vacation homes maintain a tenuous hold amongst the dunes. The access road often floods during the high tides of the new and full moons ( not to mention during time of storms) and residents and visitors have to wait an hour or so for the waters to recede to access the village. The marshand east of the dune line is a prime habitat for several species of migratory waterfowl,making this a premier spot for the many bird watchers that come to the region in the spring and fall.

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Visitors to the county are often amused by many of the strange road signs they encounter here. Here we see one of the many turtle crossings in the region, this one just east of Reed's Beach.

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Beachfront homes along Delaware Bay.

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Bayfront homes, pictured at low tide. At high tide, the waves lap underneath the buildings. Fortunately for the most part the surf is fairly gentle this far up the Bay.

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Beach Avenue, looking south. The prevailing northwest winds blow sand from the dunes over the road and it often needs to be cleared , particularly after a winter of nor'easter storms. You may notice there are no homes on this section of Beach Road. They were washed out to sea during Hurricane Gloria in the 1980s .There wasn't enough land left remaining to rebuild.

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Here we see a fisherman returning to harbor with a load of tasty blue crabs harvested from Delaware Bay. The rock and concrete jetty was built on the southern bank of the mouth of Bidwell's Creek to prevent it from being blocked by shoaling sand.

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Well, that's all I have for today. I hope you've enjoyed your visit. As always, comments are appreciated ( and encouraged). I value your feedback !

REPLIES :

Is it "sage-town" or is it "saig-town"?

It's pronounced "sig-town", although I've heard it pronounced "zig-town" also

One of the best recreation journals in SC4 history - I appreciate the patience you must have.

Thanks! I've lived here for most of my life, but I keep finding out new and interesting stuff about the region. It also gives me an excuse to get out and be a tourist .

This looks really good.

Go Devils!

Sadly, most of the folks around here are Flyers fans, but I'm with you on that one, though. Any team that actually admits it plays in New Jersey ( unlike those Giants and Jets) gets my support. :D

I like how the golf course houses are all the same - quite realistic :)

How much bulldozing did that take? :P

I tried for about an hour until I finally got frustrated and went to my last resort, the lotplop cheat. I don't like using it because it messes up the RCI demands and particularly with residential lots they don't find work and the lot abandons. I used it for the screenshot, then deleted them. Maybe I'll go back when I have more patience

Jetty Jockey

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Hello again ! In today's update, we take a look at the southern end of Swainton and the Seigtown tile.

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There is no town of South Seaville, nor is there a Seigtown . This section of Middle Township is technically part of Cape May Court House. (hey, I had to call it something)

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Most of the development is along US Route 9 ( north - south road, center), Swainton - Goshen Road ( County Road 646, northernmost east-west road) , and Seigtown Road (County Road 652 , the southern east-west road) . The Primary features of this tile are the Avalon Country Club , located east of Route 9 and the sand and gravel mines to the west.

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Looking east across Route 9 at the Avalon Golf Club. The homes between the fairways are a fairly recent addition, although why someone would pay nearly a million dollars for a house that's identical to all the rest of the homes on the street is beyond me.

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Sand and gravel mines between Seigtown Road and Swainton- Goshen Road.

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Shamefully, this area contains Cape May County's one Superfund site. In August 1979, approximately 150 drums of liquid chemical wastes and sludges were reportedly emptied on the Williams Property, including acetones, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants . In 1980, the NJ Department of Environmental Protection moved in and initiated an emergency cleanup of the spill, removing approximately 1200 cubic yards of contaminated topsoil. In addition, EPA removed 55-gallon drums, 5-gallon pails, and gas cylinders from the Site. Further studies concluded that area groundwater was contaminated up to 600 feet to the northeast. Middle Township connected the 140 affected homes and businesses with a city water supply and a series of recovery and treatment wells were installed at the site.By 2006, nearly 240 million gallons of contaminated groundwater had been extracted, treated and re-injected to the aquifer. Recent tests have shown that the remedy selected at the Williams Site has been successful, with all levels of contaminants well within acceptable standards.

source : [PDF] FIVE-YEAR REVIEW - WILLIAMS PROPERTY - 09/14/2006

www.epa.gov/superfund/sites/fiveyear/f2006020001155.pdf

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Further west on Swainton - Goshen Road is the Seigtown tile. I was unable to find any information of a town by that name at that location. I was assuming that Seigtown Road had the name for a reason. I guess I was wrong.

Jetty Jockey

Road Work

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Cape May County's transportation network has changed relatively little in the 300 plus years of its existance. Before the coming of the Europeans, the Lenni Lenape natives had built an extensive network of trails across southern New Jersey. These were used for their seasonal migrations to the coast in early summer , where they would hunt, fish and collect shells for making wampum. These trails, generally two to three feet across, traversed the easiest paths, avoiding swamps, creeks and other difficult terrain. When the first settlers arrived in the mid 17th century, they gradually widened and improved the native trails, but the region's heavy rainfall ( about 40 inches per year) often turned these paths into rivers of mud. Early roads , particularly in marshy areas , were of courdoroy construction, where logs of cedar and pine were cut from neighboring forests and laid to provide a more stable path. When these logs had sunken into the mud, another layer was simply added atop the old layers.

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Remains of a courdoroy road lie preserved in the mud along the banks of Dennis Creek near Dennisville.

In 1697, the West Jersey colonial assembly decided to extend the King's Highway from its southern end at Salem to Cape May in an effort to end the isolation of the county from the rest of the colony. The costs for construction and maintainence was to be bourne by county residents until the land in the interior could be settled. In 1707 the highway was completed. Another road, following the Delaware Bayshore was built shortly thereafter. Stagecoach lines from Cooper's Ferry (present day Camden, across the river from Philadelphia) to Cape May began regular runs by 1765. By the 19th century, turnpike companies were formed, building improved roads and charging tolls for thier use. Most of these enterprises failed, as low mileage and usage failed to generate enough capital for maintainence.

In the mid 19th century, the first railroads were completed in the region, with the West Jersey RR building a line from Camden to Cape May in 1857. It was soon joined by the Pennsylvania RR .Passengers, mail, timber and seafood were the primary cargoes. Many of the island resort towns were built when local entepreneurs convinced the railroads to build a line to thier new seaside resort hotels. The railroads enjoyed a profitable time for many years, until the coming of the automobile in the early 20th century. In 1894, the New Jersey Department of Public Roads was created, establishing a network of state roads. With the exception of the Garden State Parkway ( built in 1953) most of the state roads follow closely to the paths of the first roads in South Jersey. Route 9 is the oldest road to paralell the Atlantic Coast from Cape May to New York. Route 47 follows the path of the first road from Camden to Cape May. In 1926, the Benjamin Franklin Bridge over the Delaware River between Philadelphia and Camden was completed, opening southern New Jersey to economic development. This ended the railroad's dominance and by the mid 1930's, West Jersey RR ceased service to Cape May County. The Pennsylvania- Reading Seashore Line continued passenger service to Wildwood until the mid 1970's , but all rail service in the county ceased shortly thereafter. The Cape May Seashore Line, more a tourist attraction than a commuter service, began operations in 1996 between Cape May Court House and Cold Spring. In 1999, service was extended into Cape May city. In 2005, mechanical difficulties with the swinging drawbridge over the Cape May Canal prevented service to Cape May, and in 2007 a severe nor'easter damaged the tracks and left the railroad's locomotives stranded in Tuckahoe ( 5 miles north of Woodbine) After a series of setbacks, the CMSL resumed service between Rio Grande and Cape May in 2010.

Sources Wikipedia ( Cape May Seashore Line)

SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY and the DELAWARE BAY Historic Themes and Resources within the New Jersey Coastal Heritage Trail Route

http://www.nps.gov/h.../nj2/chap6b.htm

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road network in the northern part of the region.

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Sim road network (northwest)

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road network, northeast region. Exit numbers on the Garden State Parkway are listed in miles from it's southern end, just north of Cape May ( EXIT 0 )

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road network, southern end of the region

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Sim version. As you can see, it's mostly incomplete. Roads were placed here mainly to aid in locating terrain features.

REPLIES :

Markus J : Thanks ! I've lived in the area most of my life, and have this is my third try at recreating what's here ( well, 5 times if you count my attempts with SC 2K and SC 3K) I think I finally got it right this time.

Mastof : Thank you ! I'm hard at work pushing my way southward along the Cape. It's the positive comments and encouragement I've been recieving that keeps me going.

SimCoug : There ya go, one transportation update . As for the mapping process, it started with a small scale county street map. After determining scale ( I used a tract neighborhood I knew well, then figured a block to be 5 tiles wide : street- and two 1x2 res idential lots) , I laid the tile pattern over the street map, knowing small tiles are 64x64, mediums 128x128, and large 256x256. Then I laid down an 8x8 street grid on the game cities and a corresponding grid on my street map. After that, it was simply a matter of tracing what was on my street map to the in game grid, using the mayor's terraforming tools rather than the god mode ones ( it allows for more precise control). When I ran out of cash I blew up the city and started again. It took eighteen months to complete.

NMUSpidey : Thank you very much !

MilitantRadical : Glad to help . Just a word of warning... the ArtGolf holes are huge, and can eat up a large chunk of your tiles.

Benedict : Thanks !

Jetty Jockey

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There have been eight updates since the last reality check. Time again to compare my Sim version of Cape May County against the real thing . Dennis Township is now complete, as are the towns of Woodbine and Sea Isle City. This finishes the northern third of the map.

CLICK ON THE PICS TO GET A LARGER VERSION

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This one is from Bing ™ Maps. I like Bing for thier "Bird's Eye View" , which tilts the aerial pic to give a SC4 like view.

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... and the Sim version. I'll be working on mainland sections of Middle Township to build an industrial base ( such as it is) for my more populated barrier island communities. Stay tuned !

Replies :

Westy177 : Thanks. They look good, but I don't play. I'm of the same mind as the Rodney Dangerfield character in Caddyshack . " Country clubs and cemeteries are the biggest wastes of prime real estate" Glad you like them. tho. There's plenty more to come. Cape May County is home to about a dozen courses.

SimCoug : Yeah, you need to be a pretty hard core golfer to get out when the heat index gets into the triple digits. Personally, I prefer surf fishing as my outdoor activity of choice. Standing knee deep in 75 degree water at leasts gives one a chance to cool off. Thanks for the comment on the garden. I had never been there before this year. "Research" for my journal gives me an excuse to be a tourist in my own back yard.

NMUSpidey : Thanks for the comment ! Cape May County has an abundance of such attractions, from the beautiful to the bizzare. Something to keep the tourists happy when the weather prevents going to the beach.

MilitantRadical : The golf courses I'm using is ArtGolf by doctorgonzo ( link here : ) I like it because it's more realisticly scaled than other golf kits I've looked at, and infinitely better than the puny little reward golf course Maxis gives you. The maintenance costs won't break the bank either. It also allows me to squeeze in the cycledogg trees into the rough areas, covering up the Maxis styled trees that come with the lots.

Jetty Jockey

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In today's update we leave Dennis Township and continue south on US Route 9 to view the northern half of Swainton.

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Swainton is an unincorporated section of northeastern Middle Township. Once just rural farmland, it has in recent years been developed into a pleasant bedroom community.

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The older structures are along Seashore Road (US Route 9). Newer developments are on tree lined streets that branch out east and west from US Route 9. At the southern end of the tile, County Road 601 ( Avalon Boulevard) heads eastward from US 9 to Avalon on Seven Mile Beach Island, crossing under the Garden State Parkway and accessing that highway at Exit 13. (Parkway exits are numbered by thier distance from the southern end of the highway at Cape May , which is exit 0) . Formerly farms and woodlands, the area has become a prime housing location.

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In the woodlands west of Route 9 is the Sand Barrens Golf Course. Built in 1996, this is a premiere 27 hole state of the art golf course. Thier PARVIEW system uses GPS and a video display to show the lay of the land, yardage , pin placement, and distance to the hole to aid golfers in improving thier game.

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This adds to the residential desirability of the area. New home developments have sprung up around the golf course.

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Businesses line Avalon Boulevard ( County Road 601) between Route 9 and the Garden State Parkway. Acme Market ( a Philadelphia based chain with stores in the Mid Atlantic States) is south of the road. On the north side, near the Parkway exit is Avalon Honda. Other commercial enterprises are scattered along US 9.

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At the northern end of the tile, west of Route 9 is Leaming's Run Gardens. It the largest annual garden in the United States.

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For a modest admission, folks can wander the twisting paths through pristine woodlands, discovering peaceful hidden garden areas and natural beauty amongst the 20 acre grounds.

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Also located there is the historic Thomas Leaming House (built in 1706, one of the oldest in the county) and colonial era farm with exhibits of whaling life in late 18th century New Jersey. Crops of cotton and tobacco are grown here, and farm animals representing the period can be found.

Well, that's all I have for now. I'll leave you with a YouTube video of Leaming's Run Gardens. Enjoy !

Replies :

MarcusJ : Thanks ! I'm trying to be a bit more regular with the updates. I can knock out small and medium tiles about once a week , but the larger tiles take some time.

VMIUJcadet : The southern end of the state does look like this. Over the bridge into Atlantic County it becomes more built up, being suburbs of Atlantic City. Further north , around Seaside Heights and Asbury Park, the resort areas are very dense. I haven't been up that way in years, but it has no resemblance to what you see here.

alerules : Thanks for stopping by, and for the comment !

SimCoug : My habit of spacing out and placing trees between buildings goes all the way back to SC2000. First used to improve property values and cut pollution, I finally realised it just looked more pleasing. Since SimCity is open ended, with no set way to "win", a lot of folks ( me included when I first started ) equated a high population as a high score. I've since learned better. I've recently discovered the remains of my first CJ from 2004 in the archives section Some pics ( mostly from page 6 on) still remain. It's an crude, overurbanized mess but it chronicles my learning process pretty well. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to find my second journal, "Cape May- A Sim History"

westy177 : Thanks !

NMUSpidey : Funny you should mention the Detroit area. My recent time away was spent there in Wayne County, southwest of the city. An interesting mix of urban and rural. It could use a beach though ! After the drive through Ohio, I came up with a new slogan for thier license plates : Ohio - 250 miles of corn !

Jetty Jockey

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Welcome ! In today's update we return to the mainland for a look at the Clermont tile.

< CLICK ON PICS FOR LARGER IMAGES >

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Clermont is an unincorporated section of Dennis Township, located at the southeastern corner of the township. It sits on the relatively high ground that runs along the eastern side of the county, 13 feet above sea level. East of the tile is the tidemarsh seperating the mainland from the barrier islands. To the west is the Beaver Swamp, one of the county's many wildlife refuges.

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Clermont is located at the junction of US Highway 9 ( easternmost north-south road ) and NJ 83 (southernmost east-west FAR road). To the east of Route 9 is the Garden State Parkway, but there is no exit for Clermont. West of Route 9 is King's Highway, leading northwest to South Seaville. Paralelling NJ 83 to the north is Hagan Road, connecting to Dennisville to the west via Beaver Swamp. Clermont has seen a bit of development in recent years, and is beginning to lose it's rural look.

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North of Hagan Road has been developed into a fairly nice residential area. You can tell the age of development by its street layout. Those built in the 17, 18th and 19th century have a grid street layout. More recent ones seem to favor winding streets and cul-de-sacs.

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Some farms still exist. This one east of US 9 coexists nicely with its neighbors to the north.

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East of US 9 , south of the NJ 83 intersection is the Clermont Industrial Park. A modest amount of light industry provides jobs for Cape May County sims.

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Across the street from the Industrial Park is the Garden Greenhouse Center, providing area residents with all thier landscaping and gardening needs. The local farmer's market is great place to find locally grown Jersey Fresh ™ produce and fresh baked goods.

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More farmland west of King's Highway. Increasing land values and the higher tax burden they bring are threatening many area farmers. When the choice is between farming and making a marginal profit and selling out for millions, many just take the money and run.

Well, that's all I have for this update. Sorry for the delay , but family obligations took me out of state the past week. I hope you enjoyed the post and please feel free to offer any comments, requests, or suggestions. They are most appreciated!

REPLIES :

ImanRafidin: I'm using ploppables rather sparingly at the moment. Cape May County is a fully functional SimCity region, and the I had previously gotten myself into trouble with overuse of MMPs, which upset the RCI balance of my cities . Perhaps once the region is developed, I'll go back and add some more eye candy, but at the moment keeping the region balanced and working is my top priority.

westy177 : There's always a risk when living that close to the ocean, but the quality of life that comes from living so close to the natural beauty of the shore makes it worth it in some peoples opinions. Fortunately, there have been no storms like the 1962 nor'easter or the Great Atlantic Hurricanes of 1938 and 1944 in recent memory. We've had our share of brushes, near misses and scares through the years, notably Hurricane Gloria in 1985, the "Perfect Storm" of 1991, and Hurricane Isabel in 2003, but none lived up to the hype. I only hope that when the big one comes, folks here take it seriously.

NMUSpidey : Thanks!

SimCoug : Perserverence or stubbornnesss, who can tell? If you notice on the pics from the link to the '62 storm it appears the houses were built on pilings a good 10 feet or so above the beach.. Those are the foundations, and the before the storm were completely covered by sand. When the sand washed out, the pilings were left unsupported, causing the houses to topple and crash into the ocean like a house of cards. The nbcv piers look good zoomed in, but look weird when zoomed out, so that's why you didn't see them in any of the other pics.

jephonesewarrior: Thank you for stopping by and commenting !

shanemelbourne : Thanks. While they're no major metropolises, most of the regions population is on the barrier islands. It was a major test for the region and I'm glad that the island sims were able to find work on the mainland.

.

Jetty Jockey

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Hello again! In this installment I'm going to fill out the rest of Ludlam's Beach Island before returning to the mainland. Due to the length of the Sea Isle City update, I didn't include them there.

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North of downtown Sea Isle City are the Whale Beach section of the city and the southern end of the town of Strathmere, in Upper Township.

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Whale Beach is so named because Joeseph Ludlam and colleagues operated a whaling operation here in the 18th century. They built thier fortunes at the expense of the great beasts, but overfishing caused the collapse of the whaling industry in Cape May County by 1800. Due to modern conservation practices, the whales are making a bit of a comeback, but are now faced with the new threats of pollution and ship traffic. Whale Beach is part of the incorporated city of Sea Isle. The Boardwalk extends north from Sea Isle City to 29th Street. North of 29th Street, residences tucked into the dunes line Ocean Drive heading north.

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Along Ludlam Bay, residents attempt to reduce the effects of erosion by building walls of stone and fill along the bayshore.

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Whale Beach (looking south) shares many similarities with the northern sections of Sea Isle. Posh houses and hotels overlook the boardwalk and beach. Shops and bars line Landis Avenue , one block west. Heading west toward Ludlam Bay are the residential areas.

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Headed north on Ocean Drive we come to the Strathmere tile. On a narrow strip of land a few houses overlook both the ocean and Ludlam's Bay. Strathmere usually suffers the worst from the coastal storms that batter the Cape May County coast. Flooding usually overwashes the island here, sending ocean waves over the dunes and into Ludlam Bay. Most of the houses that have stood here have been heavily damaged or destroyed at one time by crashing waves during these storms. Notice that there are few homes remaining east of Ocean Drive. One of the most destructive storms to strike the area was the Ash Wednesday nor'easter of 1962. 70+ mph winds and 20 to 30 foot waves battered the tiny beachfront community for three days. When it all was over, very little was left standing. Click the link below for pics of the devastation .

http://www.strathmer...whalebeach.html

Recent nor'easters, like this one in 2009 have done considerably less damage, but still look pretty impressive. In the video below, a Ford F 250 follows a NJ National Guard truck north on Landis Avenue through a flooded Whale Beach section of the city

.

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A view of Ludlam's Bay in calmer weather

.

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Whale Creek leads from Ludlam Bay north to Corson's Inlet ( off map, 1 mile north). tucked away in the marshes off of Ocean Drive is the Whale Creek Marina.

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This full service marina also offers boat and kayak rentals, bait, tackle and other supplies for a fun day on the water.

Well, that's it for this installment. I hope you've enjoyed it. Thanks for viewing, and thanks for the many comments I recieved on the Sea Isle City update.

Replies :

SimCoug : The beach condos are Simgoober's Surfside Inn. It's a dead ringer for many of the oceanfront condos/hotels in the region and will most likely be seen several more times in this journal.

Kevenbro : Thanks ! Glad you enjoyed it.

StephenPullen: Yeah, the shore is definitely a Guido's paradise. An upside of this is an abundance of great little family owned pizza and sub shops

coryreinhardt : The causeway traffic shot came about by accident. When I got the notification in my news that "Road reaches limit" I went to it and thought, "Wow, that really looks familiar" The shot was an immediate keeper . Sea Isle's winter population is about 3000, and that goes up to 40000 during the summer months. The local road network is totally inadequate to handle the traffic.

westy177 : I love it when a plan comes together. My mayoral style most likely isn't appreciated by my Sim population. If it's what I want, it gets a historic designation. If not, bring in the bulldozers and keep trying until I get what I want. :D The folks at Jersey Shore aren't shedding any tears over Sea Isle's rejection. Seaside Heights ( about 100 miles north up the coast) is a much bigger city, providing more opportunities for whatever story lines they want to create.

Blurque : Thank you !

NMUSpidey : Welcome back. The Sea Isle update was a major test on whether the region would work or not. I had doubts that my seaside sims would make the long commute over the causeway to jobs on the mainland, and was picturing a beachfront slum with countless no-job zots . I guess I have to thank the makers of the NAM for my barrier island's success.

vivapanda : Thanks , and welcome back.

MilitantRadical : Thanks ! Being a tourist destination, there's plenty of YouTube videos of the area to choose from. Someone actually made a series of them, called the roads of Cape May County. I may be featuring them in later updates.

dabadon5 : Thanks for stopping by , and thanks for the comment !

I_am_One : I don't get to northern New Jersey all that often, having an aversion to the crowding of major urban areas. I prefer woods and farmlands to refineries and factories.

ImanRafidin : Thank you very much !

Jetty Jockey

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Hello ! Here it is June at the Jersey Shore and we haven't been to the beach yet. In today's update we are going offshore to Ludlam's Beach Island to visit the

resort of Sea Isle City. Get comfortable, this is a fairly lengthy update

.

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The first visitors to the island were Leni-Lenape natives, who journeyed from the mainland to fish and to collect shells for wampum, which was made from the

purple lining of clam shells. Joeseph Ludlam was the first owner of the island, purchasing the land in 1692 from the West Jersey Proprietors, a group of

prominent Quakers that included Pennsylvania founder William Penn. Ludlam divided the island into three sections. The southern section was sold to John Townsend

in 1695, who named it Townsend's Inlet. The island was used by whalers and as a grazing land for herds of cattle and sheep which were made to swim from the

mainland. Once there, they were allowed to roam free, grazing on the island's lush grasses. Pistols found in the dunes indicate the remote island was also used

by pirates in the 18th century.

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The island, without a ready supply of fresh water, remained uninhabited for nearly 200 years. In 1880, Charles Landis purchased the island with an idea to

create a resort resembling the Italian city of Venice, with it's numerous canals and waterways. In 1882, Sea Isle City was formed from the island section of

Dennis Township. Work proceeded rapidly, and by 1883 a road and two rail connections were completed from the mainland. The city boomed and several resort hotels

were built. By the end of the nineteenth century, Sea Isle City was competing with Cape May and Atlantic City as one of the premier resort destinations in South

Jersey

Sea Isle City Song by Billy Goats Gruff

.

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The city of Sea Isle occupies the central portion of Ludlam's Beach Island. The northern sections of Townsend's Inlet are on the south end of the tile.

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The only way in to town is over the Sea Isle City Causeway, a two lane road coming from Route 9 in Ocean View and Garden State Parkway exit 17. Summer traffic

on this road , particularly on Fridays coming in and Sundays going out, is extremely heavy. Traffic jams can back up the entire length of the causeway.

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Entering Sea Isle (looking west). Once over the bridge, the causeway is named JFK Boulevard, and continues to the beach. Ludlam's Landing, where livestock were

made to swim to the island from in the 1700's is now a marina (top of the pic) .

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As per John Landis' vision of Cape May County's Venice, canals were dug creating small islands in the marshes

.

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View south from the causeway Bridge. Ludlam's Landing is on the right of the channel.

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Crossing the bridge, the first thing one sees is the docks. Here you can purchase fresh seafood or go out on one of the many charter and party fishing boats to

catch your own.

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The quaint wooden hotels from the 1800's have been replaced by more modern structures.

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Same area, looking north from 39th Street Beach.

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Night shot of downtown. Unlike the mainland sections of the county, the barrier islands don't "roll up the sidewalks" after sunset.

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Sea Isle City has a vibrant night life, with numerous clubs and bars like La Costa and The Ocean Drive. Drunken party goers are a nusiance for folks living in

the vicinity of these social hot spots. It's not unlikely to find a drunk passed out in your azaleas or relieving themselves on your front lawn. The production

crew of the TV show Jersey Shore once proposed to shoot its third season in Sea Isle, only to be met with "No thanks, we have more than enough drunken idiots to

deal with already"

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Most of Sea Isle's business district is located on Landis Avenue. Resort condos and time shares line the beach. The Boardwalk (actually a tarmac path since the

city found it more economical than finding and reassembling the scattered remains of a wooden structure after each coastal storm) runs along the beachfront

south to 58th Street.

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Crossing the island at 57th Street, we come to a newer section of the city that was built on top of the tidemarsh

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Real life pic of same area.

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Looking west at Play by the Bay, which features basketball and tennis courts, softball and soccer fields,an arcade and a skate park . The only shopping center

on the island is located nearby, at 60th and Landis.

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Further south is the northern edge of the town of Townsend's Inlet. Property values are very high along the waterfront, but honestly, who wouldn't want to live

at the beach if they could afford it?

I'll leave you all with another Sea Isle Youtube video, This one's a time lapse drive down Ocean Drive (Landis Avenue) from Strathmere through Sea Isle. They hit the northern edge of the tile at about 1:07 in . Enjoy !

Replies :

Benedict : Thanks for the kind words !

ggamgus : lol. Funny thing is that most of the cast of Jersey Shore aren't even from New Jersey. We here at the shore get invaded by thousands of folks just like them , coming "down the shore" from New York or Philly beginning at the end of May. We try to deal with them with a cheerful disdain, but by the time September rolls around, most locals have had enough and can't wait to see them go. Mind you , most of the tourists are decent enough, but we do get our share of idiots like the ones depicted on TV.

shanemelbourne : I spent an entire night searching the exchange for stuff that might be usable in this journal and came up with some really good stuff. Thanks for stopping by !

militantradical : Thanks! I'll keep trying .

Bluemoose : Thanks for the comment ! On the mainland, many municipalities have minimum lot sizes to spread things out a bit. It's a bit more cramped on the islands.

SimCoug : I love the family fun center. Good place to go , especially when the beaches are too crowded. The putt-putt range is SG Mini Golf, another one of Simgoober's outstanding works. I'm a huge fan of his BATs.

×

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