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Found 133 results

  1. Ancient Egypt (Preview)

    Ancient Egypt (Preview) Ancient Egypt has always been a personal favorite place of mine - and I'm finally making it a reality in SC4. I recently found an awesome model online which I exported into a number of parts and assembled it in the game.. and the results are impressive. (If anyone is really interested in it, I'll try to contact the author to see if I can re upload it). From there it was a matter of custom lotting it and carefully removing the base textures - if anyone's interested, I did a guide on that process in my Year In Review entry. I'm planning on doing another detailed guide though soon on that and some other things. Anyways, I'm putting the finishing touches on this scene - its covering the Pyramids, Sphinx, Nile River, and some of the surrounding farmland.. expect to see the full update very soon! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - Landmarks" Big thanks to @Tonraq,@Odainsaker, @RobertLM78, @bladeberkman, @tariely, @CorinaMarie, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @nRVOUS, @kingofsimcity, @mike_oxlong, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @matias93, @jakis, @Fantozzi, @Pluispixel, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @Akallan, @redfox85, @bobolee, @Angry Mozart, @sucram17, @SC4L0ver. @Krasner, @kelistmac, @europe.au, @geminijen, @Simmer2, @gigius76, & @raynev1 for all the likes!
  2. London - Landmarks

    For the final chapter of London, we're taking a look at some more of the city's most iconic landmarks. We begin with a look back in time to the 1200s - to the Old London Bridge. Constructed in 1209 - this bridge stood for over 600 years as the main route across the River Thames. While long gone, various drawings from the era depict a bustling bridge surrounded by medieval houses on both sides. Unfortunately, the design of the bridge led to its ultimate demise, as it impeded river traffic - and was eventually demolished in the 1800s to make way for a more modern bridge. The next stop is one of London's most awe-inspiring buildings - St. Paul's Cathedral. Designed by famed architect Christopher Wren and opened in 1708, it was part of a major rebuilding program after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The cathedral serves as the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London - and is one of the city's most popular attractions as well. The London Eye is one of the city's most popular attractions - located on the banks of the River Thames, it was the world's largest Ferris wheel when completed in 2000. If you can get past the long lines, the views of the city's South Bank from the top are incredible. We continue on with a trip to one of London's most famous bridges - Tower Bridge. Not to be confused with the original London Bridge (as seen in the first picture, since replaced with more modern versions) - this Victorian Gothic landmark has been one of the city's most distinctive sights since its completion in 1894. Close by Tower Bridge is another one of the city's famous landmarks - the Tower of London. This historic structure was built back in the 1190s and has served as a fortress, palace, and prison. Our next stop is one of the city's most famous squares - Trafalgar Square. Its named after the famed Battle of Trafalgar - a key British naval victory in 1805 - and it's been a popular gathering place for people (and pigeons) since 1840. The iconic Nelson's Column in the middle of the square is one of the city's most famous monuments. Our last stop is one of the world's most iconic buildings - Big Ben. This famous clock tower is located on the north end of the Palace of Westminster and has chimed since 1859. Recent maintenance repairs though means you'll have to wait until 2021 to hear it regularly again. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - The City & The Shard" Big thanks to @matias93, @RobertLM78, @The British Sausage, @Angry Mozart, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @bobolee, @nos.17, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @APSMS, @mike_oxlong, @mattb325, @SC4L0ver, @Mr Saturn64, @Dreadnought, @tonyr, @jakis, @Neto Dari, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Tonraq, @Elenphor, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
  3. Creating realistic rural settings

    Replies: _Michael: Thanks! I spend a lot of my time expanding the city based on density transitions: high to medium, medium to low, low to medium, etc. kschmidt: Diagonals zones coming off FA roads was done to a limited extent by someone else- they however zones diagonal houses on an FA road but I took a perpendicular approach. FrankU's Dutch Parks are highly versatile and can provide posh fencing, low density tree fillers and cool looking paths. The horse race is a bit small and the diagonal downtown section has a little too much repetition but... It passes muster! I do love slotting in railyards into my industry. kelistmac: Cheers! I always go for large and gridbusting where possible- it's even possible to gridbust using strictly orthogonal streets and roads. Simmer2: Thank you! Your LOTs and BATs go some way to filling in my railways, industrial zones and rural areas. Entry 6- Creating Realistic Rural Settings Building urban areas is one speciality of mine and I do love industrial areas, but where I flourish in is with rural areas. Using MMPs I can create an organic look to a grid system of fields, or do some immense grid-busting. Listen up as I reveal some methods for creating highly realistic rural areas. 1. The 101 of Realistic Rural Scenes is rural/urban transitions and vice versa. 2. You will need fences bordering the fields, woodland filler tiles (or MMP trees), low density areas and of course the grunge roads found in Bipin's Industrial Essentials help too! 3. The city border can be all sorts: housing, light industry, a school, a large facility, a utility complex, etc. What matters though is there being a clear division between where the urban ends and the rural begins. 4. One method is mixing in fields with RCI zones. So when you move to the city outskirts there are fields either penetrating into the city area or there are fields surrounded by city blocks, etc. 5. The other crucial thing to consider is SPACE. 6. The smallest field needs to be at a minimum approximately 200 metres wide. Like the field above its width is 12 tiles across- or 192m. 7. In the North of Pololomia I mixed in fields with industrial blocks. This can make building to the grid very interesting and thus rather Americanized. Remember: SPACE, fillers and clear rural/urban divisions. 8. It's perfectly normal to have an industrial estate or business park to suddenly emerge from the countryside and farmland. But these kind of areas often have a lot of green space, trees and again SPACE. 9. Rural/urban transitions come in all shapes and sizes. For instance the railway marks the separation between an outer city suburb and the countryside. 10. In the future I will show the full area and you will appreciate the layout, size and detail involved. In these teaser pics though and in this one we have a bit of MMP gridbusting. Gravel/tarmac MMPs can go in any direction, as can walls and flora- EXPLOIT THIS to the max! 11. The next big challenge of rural/countryside scenes are the fields themselves. DO NOT use plopped field/crop lots. These have little to no variation and so make the grid stand out like a sore thumb. Because of the fields variation/(organic irregularity) your eyes are drawn to the fields, thus rendering the orthogonal roads less obvious and intrusive. 12. But MMP fields -- and I have taken great inspiration and artistic license from Ln X here -- make fields realistic. Why? Fields are organic and plants are sprouting in a chaotic fashion. Laying down MMPs emulates this chaotic distribution and so the entire field becomes this large painting- subtle variation of one theme. 13. I will explain more about MMPing fields in a future entry- but the basic process is usually mixing two flora MMPs together to create a thick, detailed look. 14. MMPs can also extend lots which seem very confined. The industrial buildings in the centre have more presence because of the dirt truck stop. This is just one small example of how texture MMPs and vehicle MMPs can produce incredibly realistic scenes with only three or four MMPs being used. 15. Using Ilive's Reader and the Lot Editor, 1x1 residential buildings can be changed into parks with no base texture. 16. I'm only just beginning to explore this technique but the results produce astonishing off-the-grid images. The buildings are surrounded by MMPs which create the illusion of a large lot, but the reality is this- these are 1x1 park tiles which have a house in the centre and a transparent texture. For the longest time I have always wanted to do something like the above and finally my dreams are coming true! Well... That wraps up this entry. And next week another entry. Stay tuned.
  4. London - The City & The Shard

    Our trip to London continues with another look at its incredible skyline. After taking a look at Canary Wharf in the first update, we're taking a look at London's other main financial district - The City of London, also known as The City, along with The Shard today. One of the city's most distinctive skyscrapers is the 591 foot tall 30 St Mary Axe (also referred to as the Gherkin, due its resemblance to a cucumber). Since opening in 2004, it has received many awards for its unique style and ecological footprint. Three of London's tallest buildings (from left to right) - Tower 42 (Completed 1980, 600 feet tall), 99 Bishopsgate (Completed 1976, 341 feet tall), and 122 Leadenhall Street (Completed 2014, 738 feet tall - also known as the cheese grater) Another rainy day in London. A couple various shots of The City. The Shard has become one of London's most recognizable buildings since opening in 2013 - rising 86 floors and 1,016 feet tall, its the tallest building in the United Kingdom and offers breathtaking views from the top. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "London - Canary Wharf" Big thanks to @kschmidt, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @TekindusT, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @huzman, @matias93, @_Michael, @Angry Mozart, @tariely. @tonyr, @The British Sausage, @Talla 2XLC, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @redfox85, @Oerk, @bobolee, @bladeberkman, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @Odainsaker, & @Marushine for all the likes & reactions!
  5. Solving the Plobbable Residential Housing Bug

    Replies: kschmidt: No I don't have the No Abandonment Mod. I have found a way to plop in LARGE amounts of residential without triggering abandonment of the plopped residential buildings. Thanks for your comment. IL.: Size always matters... For a CJ... Ahem. Talla 2XLC: Thanks for your comment! Terring: Thank you! TekindusT: Cheers! Green and wide I say! kim026: Thanks! Prophet42: Thank you! Everything I have shown has been done without using the Lot Editor. All it takes is the right BATs, LOTs and dependencies. Entry 4: Plobbable Residential Abandonment Problem now Solved! We are in for a treat today folks! I believe I have stumbled across a workaround which prevents plopped residential buildings (R$, R$$ and R$$$) from becoming abandoned. 1. Here is the area I will be infilling- to the left of the road going northwards. 2. Step 1: zone out a plot which matches the size of the residential lot to be plopped, in this case 3x3. 3. Step 2: Pick -- using the BuildingPlop cheat -- a residential lot. I have picked CP_VictorianSmallRes$$_12_Decid and from that the CP_R$$5_3x3_VictorianRow_12Hses. The lot is circled in red and looks good in medium density areas. 4. Step 3: Let residential buildings grow, make sure every one of these lots matches the size of our plopped residential lot. In this case 3x3. REMEMBER: this step is the MOST important of them all!!! 5. Step 4: Pick the residential lot from the BuildingPlop cheat list and plop in the lot exactly upon the 3x3 plots. Press cheetah speed, watch the months go by and voila! No No Job Zot and no abandonment! As long as there is a residential lot which is grown and matches the lot size of the residential lot you wish to use- your plopped residential lot will not become abandoned. 6. And that's it! Now the next step is to complete this area and one thing with this particular housing lot are the street tile textures emerging from the middle of the lot. I create false intersections using the elevated rail pieces: elevated rail connected to elevated rail over street. Demolish the elevated rail section and what is left behind is a 1x1 street segment which isn't rounded. 7. Looks better with those false intersections doesn't it? Lastly we pretty up the area to the left and add some W2W shops plus carparking on top to finish off this city block. 8. It's a very simple layout which works thanks to the fabulous lotting and batting of the content creators. 9. Here are some examples of residential plopping in action. 10. 11. 12. So to conclude: no more waiting around for the residential buildings you want, no more abandonment of plopped residential buildings AND a chance to use every residential building listed in the BuildingPlop menu. Please let me know in the comments whether you are able to replicate (copy) this in your cities. Please also note that if abandonment occurs due to low desirability, traffic noise, crime, pollution, garbage or radiation then I suspect these plopped residential buildings will remain abandoned even if desirability improves. Whereas normal zoned residential buildings which are abandoned can become reoccupied again. One unknown is how plopped RCI will react on a massive scale or on a ubiquitous scale. I would say at least a third of my residential buildings in Pololomia are plopped and my plopped commercial and industrial buildings have not been adversely effected. So your feedback will be most useful! Thanks, and if this cheat works for you then your whole SC4 gaming experience is about to be RADICALLY CHANGED! Enjoy!!!
  6. London - Canary Wharf

    London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom. It's a city known for its culture, history, and traditions - and is one of the world's most visited cities. Additionally, it's one of the world's greatest commercial, financial, and industrial centers - and is widely known as a truly global city. Over the next three update updates I'll be covering some of the city's most incredible sights and landmarks - starting with Canary Wharf. This major banking district is located on the Isle of Dogs on the banks of the River Thames - and has been home to some of the busiest ports in the world over the years. Today, its best known for its incredible collection of skyscrapers like the 771 ft tall One Canada Square (lower middle below, with the pyramid top), 655 ft tall 8 Canada Square (HSBC Tower, lower left below), and the 655 ft tall 25 Canada Square (middle skyscraper below, citigroup signage) - which are among the tallest in the United Kingdom. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 3/3)" Big thanks to @jakis, @RobertLM78, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @RandyE, @Silur, @Fantozzi, @mike_oxlong, @redfox85, @_Michael, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Odainsaker, @kschmidt, @The British Sausage, @SC4L0ver, @bobolee, @mrsmartman, @raynev1, @scotttbarry, @Elenphor, @Marushine, & @huzman for all the likes!
  7. Paris (Pt. 3/3)

    Our trip to Paris continues with a trip to the Sacré-Cœur Basilica (Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris) - one of Paris' most beautiful churches, often drawing comparisons to the Taj Mahal. Located on top of a small hill in the heart of the city, the church is visible for miles around. The next stop is Place de la Concorde - Paris' most famous square. Originally designed in 1755, this square is unlike anything else in the city - complete with a massive authentic Egyptian obelisk in the middle. The Panthéon, located in Paris' Latin Quarter, is another one of the cities most famed landmarks. Originally modeled after Rome's Pantheon and built as a church - it now functions as a mausoleum for many of France's most famous citizens. The Bourse de commerce is one of the city's most unique buildings, both in shape and function. It was originally used as a place to trade grain upon completion in 1763, then as a stock exchange, and more recently, plans are underway to transform it into a major art museum. The 689 foot tall Tour Montparnasse is the tallest skyscraper in Paris - and is hard to miss. Upon completion in 1973, the building was heavily criticized for its style and for being out of place - and as a result, buildings over 7 stories tall were banned from the city center. A massive renovation is slated to begin in 2019. Our tour of Paris ends with one of the city's most famous landmarks - the Arc de Triomphe. Built between 1803 and 1836, this iconic monument serves as a tribute to French soldiers lost in wars and has important military leaders engraved on its walls. For those wishing to get up close - make sure you use the underground tunnels instead of dodging the traffic.. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 2/3)" Big thanks to @CorinaMarie, @Odainsaker, @MushyMushy, @matias93, @Angry Mozart, @RobertLM78, @Silur, @_Michael, @The British Sausage, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @Fantozzi, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @bobolee, @raynev1, @APSMS, @SC4L0ver, @gigius76, @bladeberkman, @kingofsimcity, @Haljackey, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @jakis, @Talla 2XLC, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  8. There Will Be Diagonals!

    Replies: TowerDude: Some entries will have commentaries as I explain certain key things. nos. 17: The apple doesn't fall far from the tree... Anyway, thanks for your comment! Talla 2XLC: Just keeping a low profile and focusing on the cities. And yes I use the building plop cheat extensively in my cities. sucram17: Thank you very much! kscmidt: Virtually every RCI building has been plopped- there is a trick to get residential buildings plopped without them becoming abandoned. IL.: Thank you! Abrams124: Cheers! And I will keep going... Entry 3: There Will Be Diagonals! I have developed Pololomia considerably and I am finding it very easy to expand the city and infill areas. So without further adieu here are 16 more pictures to feast your eyes on! 1. Here is Pololomia so far. 2. I am gradually stitching together the various areas. 3. Piece by piece... 4. Diagonal by diagonal. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. This area came out something special... 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. I'm now going to start developing the outskirts and the rural/urban city borders. 16. MMPs are love. MMPs are life. Next week there will be another update from Pololomia. Enjoy and have a great weekend!
  9. Paris (Pt. 2/3)

    Our tour picks back up with a trip to La Madeleine - one of the city's most recognizable churches. Originally designed as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army - its Greek style sets it apart from the rest. Since its completion in 1842, it's been one of the most popular attractions in the city. The Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe is one of the most beautiful theaters in the city and one of France's six national theaters. The Palais Garnier is one of Paris' most grand opera houses - opened in 1875, it's a true masterpiece. The next stop is one of Paris' most unique landmarks - the Centre Pompidou. Completed in 1977, this enormous colored building is covered in a maze of pipes going in every direction - and has housed a popular art museum ever since. (Animation might take a little bit to completely load) Our last stop today is one of the world's most famous landmarks - the Eiffel Tower. Completed in 1889 for the Universal Exposition to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution - this 986 foot tall tower became the world's tallest freestanding structure for over 40 years. It's remained an icon of Paris and France ever since. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 1/3)" Big thanks to @kingofsimcity, @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @RobertLM78, @huzman, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Manuel-ito, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Silur, @redfox85, @Tyberius06, @Andrey km, @bobolee, @MushyMushy, @The British Sausage, @mrsmartman, @matias93, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Girafe, @jakis, @feyss, @martijn.1, @Transport, & @Elenphor for all the likes!
  10. Prague

    Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic and one of the most picturesque cities in all of Europe. It's a city steeped in history - once the capital of the kingdom of Bohemia, its been a cultural, political, and economic center for centuries. The first stop in our tour is the Petrín Lookout Tower - located at the top of a small hill, this 62m tall Eiffel Tower lookalike offers stunning views of the city. Not too far away is another one of Prague's famous landmarks - St. Vitus Cathedral. Construction took nearly 600 years, finally completing in 1929 - but this magnificent Gothic cathedral was well worth the wait. Countless religious and coronation ceremonies have been held here - making it one of the most important landmarks in the city. To make it into the old town, you'll have to cross the Charles Bridge, spanning the Vlatva River. Completed in 1402, this stunning Gothic styled bridge is one of Prague's most famous landmarks and one of the world's most famous bridges. We've made it into the famed old town. With the incredible Týn Church and Astronomical Clock close by, this stunning town square is steeped in history. The aforementioned Týn Church (fully known as the Church of Our Lady before Týn) is one of the world's most beautiful Gothic churches - built back in the mid 1400s and completed by the mid 1600s, it towers some 260 feet above the surrounding rooftops of Prague. The cathedral also serves as a gallery of Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque works - its a historic site in Prague that anyone visiting here should be sure to visit. Like many other similar cities and towns across Bohemia and Central Europe, Prague enjoys a rich tradition of Christmas markets. Starting in early December and ending by early January, the stalls here have an unbelievable amount of goods on sale - from treats, decorations, handmade goods and more. For those braving the elements - the selection is second to none and its a trip you won't soon forget. No Christmas market is complete though of course without an enormous Christmas tree - and the ones here can get as high as 100 feet tall, making it truly a sight to behold. Once nightfall hits and the snow begins to clear - you can get a clear view of the twinkling lights and all the magic this place has to offer. Another one of Prague's famed traditions is the legendary fireworks display that takes place on New Year's Eve - the entire town gathers in the square and surrounding streets to take in the breathtaking views. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Elenphor, @The British Sausage, @Oerk, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Neto Dari, @TekindusT, & @mrsmartman for all the likes!
  11. Paris (Pt. 1/3)

    Paris is the capital and largest city of France and has been one of the world's most important cities for centuries. This timeless city is known for its fashion, food, literature, entertainment, and culture. In addition, it's widely known as being an important international business and commerce center - making it a truly global city. Paris also boasts some of the world's finest architecture and much of the city was renovated in the mid 1800s by architect Georges-Eugène Haussmann. Over the next three updates we'll be taking a look at some of its most iconic sights and landmarks. We'll begin with a trip down one of the city's most famous avenues - the Champs-Élysées. First completed in 1670 and redeveloped many times since, its impressive tree-lined streets are surrounded by many of the city's most luxurious shops, cafes, and theaters. On Bastille Day (July 14th), it's also home to the largest military parade in Europe. The next stop is one of the city's most stunning cathedrals, the famous Notre-Dame de Paris. Opened in 1345, this awe-inspiring building is considered to be one of the world's finest examples of French Gothic architecture. La Défense is Europe's largest purpose built business district and is where you'll find just about all of Paris' skyscrapers. The uniquely shaped Grande Arche in the middle is the centerpiece of the district - opened in 1989, it serves as a monument for the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution. The Louvre is another one of Paris' premier destinations - inside you'll find the famous Mona Lisa in its art museum. Our last stop for today is the Gare du Nord - first built back in 1846, this famous train station has been rebuilt time and time again to expand it's capacity. Today, it's the world's busiest train station outside of Japan and connects Paris with a number of other cities across France. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Prague" Big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @RobertLM78, @mrsmartman, @Oerk, @The British Sausage, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @bladeberkman, @mike_oxlong, @RandyE, @Odainsaker, @bobolee, @Talla 2XLC, @Manuel-ito, @tariely, @raynev1, @redfox85, @SC4L0ver, @Simmer2, @kingofsimcity, @Jonas_Chaves, & @Nenitosoyyo for all the likes!
  12. Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)

    Our journey to Cephalonia concludes with one last trip through the countryside. From the winding roads, small farms, and stunning natural beauty - there's so many things that makes this island so beautiful, and makes it a fitting way to end our trip. Additionally, I'll be showcasing some more overviews of Cephalonia. We were last at Myrtos Beach - and after a fun day at the beach, we made accommodations at the nearby Plaza Myrtos for the night. Once nightfall hits, the only lights you'll find in the distance are that of the occasional boat or two. It's quiet and peaceful - but also quite beautiful. Our room in the villa happens to overlook the edge of the beach - so we get an excellent view of the sunrise. Fortunately, we didn't have to deal with any of the rain at the beach.. The rain finally lets up - but is quickly replaced by a blanket of thick fog for most of the evening. The Cephalonian countryside is crossed by a variety of winding roads. There's no such thing as a dull drive here - and between every twist and turn, the views are incredible. Small, charming churches like this one dot the countryside. Two last overviews of the Cephalonian countryside. And to wrap things up - a couple of full tile overviews. (Click for full size.) I hope you enjoyed your visit to Cephalonia! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Myrtos Beach)" Big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @RobertLM78, @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @redfox85, @bobolee, @_Michael, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @Manuel-ito, @mrsmartman, @Jonas_Chaves, @raynev1, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, & @Talla 2XLC for all the likes!
  13. Developing the City of Pololomia

    Replies: Urban Constanta: Thank you! Odainsaker: I didn't know that- so thanks for that brief slice of urban history. I basically went for a style that is green, takes up space and has paths/parks running through these neighbourhoods. RandyE: It is harder to build extensively with diagonals because there are fewer buildings to use, but I have worked out ways of creating diagonal city blocks. As for the industry and commerce a lot of that style you were talking must be because I used Mattb325's buildings which are spacey, have green spaces and look rather modern. kschmidt: It means a lot of use of the "Make Historical" button! I used the No Maxis buildings mod and I have in my head a list of buildings which suit various themes. The "standard" you were talking about is actually growable for the green suburbs. licoricebomb: The horses can be found here- http://sc4devotion.com/csxlex/lex_filedesc.php?lotGET=2862. Entry 2: Developing the City of Pololomia In this entry I show you the current state of Pololomia and finished areas. This is a large city tile I'm working on and one which is a basic template for the style I go for when playing SC4. Enjoy! 1. So this is the city of Pololomia as it stands. In the southwest corner is the city centre, then the city fans outwards and decreases in density... 2. The W2W buildings I have used are mainly Jasoncw, NoFunk and Goofyguytpa creations which can be found on the STEX. 3. While I have found that Mattb325's creations are great for filling in city blocks which aren't necessarily W2W. 4. The W2W Buddhist temple is zero7's Z7 Temple and Stupa. 5. Every city block I create has parking in the middle, back alleys or gardens at the back which connect together. It's easy to place buildings down but it is a lot harder connecting them together- so I use car parking, trees, parks and other fillers to make each city block unique. Also MMPs are useful too for adding variety to blank texture tiles! 6. An even trickier thing to pull off is density transitions. Ideally in the centre of cities and the inner city area the buildings are at least several floors high with higher buildings dotted around. But in mid-rise areas this can be anywhere between 10 to 4 floors high with the occasional tower block. While for low-rise areas it can be anywhere from ground floor height to four floors high. 7. The secret to diagonal city building is hiding the jagged square edges of the textures. In this picture I have hidden/disguised most of the jagged square edges so that it all blends together. SFBT Diagonal Fillers and Simcoug's Diagonal Tenements are some of my preferred methods for building diagonally. 8. And now back to the inner city area and this time railways. Now railways really need to separate and divide a city. So that means walls, tunnels and bridges. Having road crossings on a railway in an inner city area is not very common. So in this picture I used FLUPS to really emphasise the railway splitting up the city, lastly every bit of the railway is bordered with fences and walls. 9. Little roundabouts can be a great cosmetic addon or architectural addon even if it's a little unrealistic. Also tight FLUPs in urban areas are some of the coolest things this game has to offer. 10. Roundabouts can also prove to be a useful means of separating streets and SAM streets... 11. In this neighbourhood I used KingOfSimCity's Maxis Mansion Overhaul mod which is incredibly cool stuff. Large lots, green areas and those FA tennis courts! 12. But it's also important to break up a themed area with other fillers: for instance WorkingManProductions Allotment set and FrankU's parks (tree fillers). 13. The next entry will show further development from Pololomia and more finished city scenes. I think this city will take four or five weeks to finish. In the north and east I want to create rural areas and farmland and THAT is the trickiest transition of them all - urban to rural! So see you then! And thanks a lot for your comments!
  14. OSL Airport is located at the bottum! Post 1: Since summer is over and school has started, so I finally got into Simtropolis and all it's prettiness, I thought why not make a CJ for you and me to enjoy together. I chose a map which I think is cool and so let's get started. The style i'm going for would be an American style, but a little different. And of course a Strictoaster Fuel supply. Our source will mostly be renewable energy, but a oil field or two will be made in the future.
  15. An Introduction to The URS

    Welcome to The URS! What is The URS? Well... 1. The URS stands for Urban/Rural/Scenic. 2. This CJ will cover all sorts. 3. Lush, green suburbs... 4. With rich details and some nice patterns. 5. Commercial areas and civic complexes... 6. With some realistic spacing and division of areas. 7. Diagonals are covered too! 8. And I throw in all kinds of fillers to make areas look interesting. 9. And what about the urban, W2W and inner city areas? 10. No problem! 11. But we are forgetting industry! 12. And of course the MMPs! 13. Rougher, low-wealth and rundown areas are also covered in The URS. 14. Old content meets new content. You will see old plugins effortlessly fit in with new content, new mods and new fillers. 15. And of course every area and every city will have its own feeling to it. So that's The URS in a nutshell. This month and the next I am working on a city tile. After that I'll be specialising in a particular area: farms, industry, forestry, suburbs, seaports, power plants, etc... There will be weekly updates. So... See you around and I hope you have enjoyed these pictures.
  16. Cephalonia (Myrtos Beach)

    Our next stop is Myrtos Beach - arguably the most beautiful location in all of Cephalonia. Due to it's remote location, you won't be able to reach it by foot - the only way to reach Myrtos Beach it is to traverse your way down a series of steep curves. If you're able to make it there however, you'll be rewarded greatly with warm waters, soft white sand, and the view of a lifetime. The day starts early for anyone wanting a prime spot at the beach - and the roads throughout the surrounding countryside are already starting to fill up with cars. The roads slowly start to get steeper and steeper - a sign that we're getting closer to the beach. As we start to see scree slopes dot the surrounding hills - it means we're just about there. We stop at an overlook and get our first good look of the beach. It's quite stunning.. but the first order of business is how to get down there. There's only one way, and it's not for the faint of the heart. A steep road filled with hairpin curves traverses down the mountainside - and when it gets busy, it only becomes that much more intimidating. But if you can make it down to the bottom, you'll be rewarded greatly. We're finally at the beach! We get a great spot and start soaking up the sun. A couple of Myrtos Beach panoramas (click for full-size). The beach in all its glory. If you can get past the huge crowds, there's really no other place like it on Cephalonia. It's a truly stunning natural wonder. And finally, various views of the beach and surrounding countryside from above. Myrtos Beach is truly a quite a sight to behold. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Rural Scenes)" Big thanks to @Artimus, @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @Manuel-ito, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, @_Michael, @RobertLM78, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Maloskero, @mrsmartman, @Neto Dari, @Marushine, @bobolee, @Prophet42, @Odainsaker, @redfox85, @GoKingsGo, & @SC4L0ver for all the likes!
  17. Cephalonia (Rural Scenes)

    For our next chapter of Cephalonia, we stay in the countryside - but this time, focusing on the small village of Anomeria and a number of surrounding rural scenes. Quaint villages like these dot the landscape for as far as the eye can see - while they may be small, they more than make up for it with their charm and character. Early morning in rural Greece is truly special - there's really nothing else like it. While most days are sunny and beautiful here - it's not uncommon for fog to roll in at the blink of an eye. ... rain showers are probably the only thing that can spoil your day here. But the rain is usually gone as quick as it rolls in. The golden sunsets of rural Greece are something that you don't want to miss out on. Nighttime here is quiet, yet beautiful. For centuries, small plots of land lined with stone walls have dotted the landscape. They're a cheap, efficient way to divide up fields. When viewed from above - rural Greece can be quite stunning. Myrtos Beach is off in the distance - and it happens to be our next destination Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Farmland)" Big thanks to @MushyMushy, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, @Toby Ferrian, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @Oerk, @Artimus, @redfox85, @bobolee, @_Michael, @Manuel-ito, @raynev1, @The British Sausage, @Elenphor, @Marushine, @Dirktator, @mrsmartman, & @JP Schriefer for all the likes!
  18. Cephalonia: Introduction

    The Mediterranean is one of the world's most beautiful destinations - and Greece's Cephalonia is one of its most spectacular islands. Between the soft sand, crystal clear water, beautiful landscapes, and perfect temperatures - any trip here is truly unforgettable. After previously exploring this theme earlier in 2016 - I've decided to expand on it quite a bit. I've detailed the remainder of the tile, covering every last bit of land with flora - and there's going to be a massive variety of new scenes to explore. We'll get the five-part series started off by taking a look at one of the defining features of Greece - the Ionian Sea. From there, it's off to the countryside to visit some of the beautiful farmland that covers the island. We'll then visit one of the many charming villages that dot the landscape - Anomeria. The fourth update will be a special one - a trip to Cephalonia's iconic Myrtos Beach. We'll then wrap things up with one last trip through the countryside, along with some overviews of the entire tile. With 100 pictures in total - it's going to be a truly incredible trip. We begin in a couple of days - you won't want to miss it! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Greece: Part III" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @TekindusT, @Tyberius06, @SC4L0ver, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @redfox85, @Toby Ferrian, @_Michael, @Fantozzi, @Manuel-ito, @Maloskero, @raynev1, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @RandyE, @Tonraq, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, & @Marushine for all the likes!
  19. Cephalonia (Waterside)

    It's impossible to imagine Greece without the sea - so it's only fitting that we start our tour of Cephalonia with some scenes from the surrounding Ionian Sea. Thousands of years ago, Greek fleets once crossed these waters, engaging in massive wars. While things may be quite a bit different these days - the sea still remains vital. From enjoying a day out in the sun to taking your boat out on a cruise - this is one of the most picturesque locations in the entire Mediterranean. We begin with one of the many campgrounds that overlook the water here. It's difficult to imagine a more beautiful location. Hot air balloons are one of the best ways to view the island - the views from above are simply incredible. For those seeking a thrill - hang gliding is a popular activity throughout the region! While whale spottings are rare in this part of Greece - if you keep your eyes out, you just might get lucky and spot a few. Early mornings on the beach are spectacular. Quieter crowds and beautiful golden sunrises make this a great time to visit. Even in misty weather - the landscapes here are magical. The only concern might be the occasional rain shower.. If hang gliding wasn't enough adventure - you can also try out paragliding. With landscapes this stunning and crowds growing in the summer months - one hot air balloon might not be enough. The steep roads here that overlook the ocean offer some truly incredible views. The surrounding farmland of Cephalonia is just as beautiful - and it's where we'll be headed to next. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia: Introduction" Big thanks to @mike_oxlong, @GoKingsGo, @RobertLM78, @RandyE, @_Michael, @Fantozzi, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @Toby Ferrian, @sucram17, @Elenphor, @matias93, @TMTS, @redfox85, @raynev1, @Marushine, @Odainsaker, @kingofsimcity, @bobolee, @juliok92012, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  20. Cephalonia (Farmland)

    One of the most beautiful sights in all of Cephalonia are the many rural farms that flank the hillsides. Despite Greece being infamously poor for farming (in ancient times, they would actually import many of their crops from other countries such as Egypt due to poor soil conditions) - conditions are just good enough here that a number of crops are able to grow. It's a simple beauty that makes it so special, one that has lasted for thousands of years. Small farmhouses like this one dot the landscape - with olives, wheat, and grapes being vital crops. In springtime, the blooming flowers put on a beautiful display - complimenting the natural beauty of the region. Sunsets here are quite magical. The Ancient Greeks needed a crop that would grow on the rough, rugged hillsides. That crop was olives - and these groves have dotted the Cephalonian landscape for thousands of years. Today, Greece is the world's third largest olive exporter - for many here, getting a good harvest is crucial. The rural roads here are quite beautiful. Surrounded by rows of cypress trees and endless fields - there's not many drives out there that can compare. Finding them is quite rare - but the occasional sunflower patch makes for a beautiful contrast of colors. The long abandoned farmhouse.. When viewed from above - you can really get a complete grasp of how beautiful Cephalonia is and everything it has to offer. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Waterside)" Big thanks to @redfox85, @RobertLM78, @Artimus, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @bladeberkman, @Toby Ferrian, @scotttbarry, @CorinaMarie, @mike_oxlong, @TMTS, @mrsmartman, @Odainsaker, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @raynev1, @tariely, @GoKingsGo, @Namiko, @APSMS, @_Michael, & @Prophet42 for all the likes!
  21. Greece - Part III

    Our tour of Greece begins with one of its most recognizable landmarks - the iconic windmills of Mykonos. Windmills used to be a defining feature of the Greek landscape - you could find hundreds of them dotting the various islands. Today, only a handful remain - and the ones in the best condition can be found on the island of Mykonos. Built back in the 16th century, they once harassed the powerful northern wind into grinding wheat. While no longer operational, they still serve as one of the most popular tourist attractions in the country. We continue to tour the islands - this time, stopping in Crete and visiting its famous ruins of Knossos. Called "Europe's oldest city" - people once settled here as far back as 7000 BCE. The first major palaces were built back in 1900 BCE and became one of the greatest sights in the Mediterranean - it was far more complex and flamboyant than any of the other palaces in the region. Around 1700 BCE, massive earthquakes struck the region - initially destroying the palace. Over the next couple hundred years, the palace was destroyed and rebuilt a number of times, due to volcanoes, more earthquakes, and invaders - and was ultimately abandoned around 1375 BCE. While much of it remains in ruins today - there's still plenty to do and explore, making it another popular tourist destination. We head to the mainland where we'll visit Greece's most famous landmark - the Parthenon. Part religious temple (dedicated to the goddess Athena) and part treasury - this iconic structure was built between 447 and 432 BCE and stands high over Athens, at the top of its monumental Acropolis. While the structure was in decent condition for many centuries - a Venetian siege back in 1687 caused much of the damage you see today, as nearly 700 cannonballs were launched into its famous columns. We head further north, into the incredible landscapes of Meteora. Since the early 14th century, the local monks have been building monasteries high up on these steep rocks - there's really no other place like it on Earth. While most would associate Greece with the sea and sunny days - its not uncommon to see snow here, as the mountains will essentially block out gusts from the sea, causing massive temperature swings. No matter what time of the year you visit though - Meteora will still take your breath away. We head back into the Aegean Sea to visit one of Greece's most beautiful islands - Santorini. A massive volcano blew the top off of this island back in 1646 BCE - drastically changing the look of the island and turning it into one of the most unique destinations in all of the Mediterranean Sea. Today, beautiful white villas flank the steep cliff sides - and the views from the top make for an unforgettable trip. We head back south - making sure to stop at one of the most stunning ruins in all of Greece, the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion - located just south of Athens. The Ancient Greeks picked the perfect spot to honor their God of the Sea - the views of the ocean from here are absolutely incredible. Built back in 440 BCE, it was never fully completed - but still served as an important place of worship for many decades. Our last stop is one of Greece's most beautiful and stunning destinations - Navagio Beach, located on the island of Zakynthos in the Ionian Sea. Back in 1980, the freightliner MV Panagiotis crashed into the beach after a night of stormy conditions - and it's been abandoned ever since, giving the beach its famous nickname of "Shipwreck Beach". Between the crystal clear water, pristine sand, and towering limestone cliffs - its a perfect place to spend the day. Note: To make the Navagio Beach scene, instead of using a cliff mod - I ended up creating my own BAT to get the best result. If anyone is interested in the model and wants to try their hand with it - feel free to PM me Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: North Africa" Big thanks to @_Michael, @Toby Ferrian, @redfox85, @CorinaMarie, @raynev1, @bladeberkman, @Odainsaker, @bobolee, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Manuel-ito, @Tonraq, @MushyMushy,@kingofsimcity, @TMTS, @Elenphor, @Jonas_Chaves, @RobertLM78, @Marushine, @mrsmartman, @Namiko, & @mike_oxlong for all the likes!
  22. Tour of Africa: Central Africa

    The tour resumes as we look towards one of Africa's most iconic natural wonders - the legendary Mount Kilimanjaro. Standing some 19,341 feet tall - its Africa's tallest mountain and one of its most popular climbing destinations. Despite its height, its a relatively easy climb - its essentially a big trek to the top - but what you do need to watch out for here is the very real risk of altitude sickness. While the top might not be as impressive as it once was with many of its iconic glaciers melting due to climate change - it still offers some of the most incredible views the world has to offer. From Kilimanjaro, we travel north into Kenya to witness some of Africa's most stunning wildlife. Our first stop is the incredible Masai Mara National Reserve - home to some of the best wildlife on the face of the planet. You'll find elephants, giraffes, zebras, lions, wildebeest, and countless others roaming these lands - even with declining numbers in recent years, there's still plenty here to observe and stare at in awe. The best way though to view them though is high above in a hot air balloon - despite the cost, its still certainly an experience that you won't want to miss out on. We continue north to another one of Kenya's wildlife gems - the incredible Lake Logipi. This algae-infested rift valley lake is home to countless lesser flamingos each year during migration - they make for a truly stunning sight among the many hot springs and geysers that dot the shoreline. Further north is where you'll find what some call the world's biggest swamp: the Sudd of South Sudan. The very name "Sudd" is Arabic for barrier or obstruction - and that's just what this swamp has been for thousands of years for the locals and outsiders alike. Not even the Roman Empire could get past it - Emperor Nero himself sent his troops up the White Nile, but the Sudd prevented any further colonization. These swamps have also have made the search for the source of the White Nile particularly difficult - its simply that big and difficult to navigate. Despite the nature of the swamps, the locals have lived here for thousands of years, usually setting up small huts on various islands across the swamps. Although seeing wildlife here can be rare - its still possible to see a thundering herd of elephants now and then making their way across the swamp. We begin making our way back down south through the rural landscapes of the Great Rift Valley. For as far as the eye can see, the lands here are crossed by an intricate pattern of huts and farmland, providing the locals just enough to make a living off of. Our final stop in Central Africa is another one of Africa's premier natural wonders - majestic Victoria Falls. The tribes here call it "the smoke that thunders" - which seems quite fitting as you can hear the water cascading down these sheer cliffs from miles away. At 355 feet tall, these might not be the world's tallest waterfalls - but they're certainly one of the most awe-inspiring - and a destination that anyone visiting here won't want to miss. (No photoshop used on the scene below) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: East Africa" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @Toby Ferrian, @Urban Constanta, @Manuel-ito, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @nRVOUS, @RandyE, @SC4L0ver, @bobolee, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Namiko, @mattb325, @mrsmartman, @kelistmac, @matias93, @Marushine, @Jonas_Chaves, & @Akallan for all the likes!
  23. Tour of Africa: East Africa

    The tour continues on as we make our way to Madagascar and the many unique destinations that dot the shorelines. Our first stop however, will be at one of the many quaint fishing villages along the shore. The friendly locals have been fishing in these waters for centuries, and it remains one of the most vital economic activities in this part of the world. After a couple of days driving through the barren landscapes of rural Madagascar - we finally reach the stunning natural wonder of Isalo Massif. This national park is well known for its unique plant and animal life - and looks like something that came straight out of the Jurassic era. Hiking is popular in these parts, but do be careful - many of the rocks here are crumbling and it can be a long ways down.. On the west coast of Madagascar is where you'll find one of its most famed attractions - the endless forests of baobab trees. These are some of the most unique trees in the world - reaching heights as tall as 100 ft, they're hard to miss - and every trip to Madagascar should include a visit here. However, as with many natural wonders across the world - human activity has had a profound impact here, and could continue to cause bigger issues down the road. The trees originally didn't grow in isolated patches, but were once instead part of a great forest - one that's been cut down to a small fraction of its original size. While the locals have left the baobabs as a sign of respect, it should be noted that this area isn't a national park and could very well be subject to further deforestation and human activity in the years to come. Not too far away from the baobabs is where you'll find another one of Madagascar's wonders - Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park. These majestic karst formations have been carved into razor sharp pinnacles by groundwater and the elements, and this dramatic forest of stone is a destination that you won't want to miss. Plenty of unique plants and animals are found here as well, thriving in the unique elements - making for a truly unique trip. We board our boat and make our way back to the mainland, where we'll spend the next couple of days visiting a few more of the stunning villages that dot the shorelines of Mozambique. Between the pristine blue water, unique architecture, and perfect weather - there's few places in Africa that can rival their beauty. We move into the mainland, and the next destination is the wildlife haven of Serengeti National Park in northern Tanzania. With plentiful populations of giraffes and other unique animals, its a must-visit destination - and if you're lucky, you might even spot a couple of rare black rhinos along the way as well. Be on the lookout though for giraffe in particular - you never know when they might cross the road, feet away from your car.. The last stop is one of Africa's most beautiful and deadly locations - the stunning crater and lava lake of 11,385 foot tall Mount Nyiragongo. This volcano has a long history of violent eruptions, and with the last eruption coming in 2016 - you never know when it might be set off again. For the particularly adventurous tourist - you can hike up to the steep crater rim and take in stunning views of the world's largest lava lake. (No photoshop used - this goes for the previous one too. The lava lake is a big custom texture & prop I made, along with a couple Maxis smoke animations.) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Southern Africa" Big thanks to @Manuel-ito, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, @Fantozzi, @RobertLM78, @huzman, @Toby Ferrian, @_Michael, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @TekindusT, @bobolee, @Odainsaker, @mike_oxlong, @nRVOUS, @GoKingsGo, @raynev1, @Marushine, @The British Sausage, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @matias93, @Neto Dari, @Jonas_Chaves, @Akallan, @Namiko, & @Elenphor for all the likes!
  24. Sydney

    Our trip to Sydney begins with one of the world's most recognizable buildings - the Sydney Opera House. Built in 1973 - its unique white seashell shape truly sets this skyline apart from the rest. Sitting just behind it is the Royal Botanic Gardens - opened in 1816, there's no better place to take a stroll on a sunny day. Just as recognizable is the world famous Sydney Harbour Bridge - built in 1932, it's one of the best ways to cross the harbour. At night, its distinctive lights dominate the surrounding waters. Water taxis are a great way to get around the harbour, and the Circular Quay (whose name contradicts its squarish shape) near the CBD is one of the most popular destinations in the entire city. Sydney is a city known for it's suburbs. In fact, it's got 555 of them - but few are as beautiful as Lavender Bay. It's easily reached by water taxi, has great views of the Harbour Bridge and the skyline in the distance - not to mention being ranked consistently as one of Sydney's most livable suburbs. It's a great place to call home. A rainy day in the CBD. Some of Sydney's most recognizable buildings can be found near Hyde Park - such as the MLC Centre, which held the title as the city's tallest building for 15 years. Nearby is the Sydney Tower - completed in 1981, you can enjoy some exotic cuisine 360 degree rotating restaurant. Another scene from the CBD - some of Sydney's tallest buildings - Deutsche Bank Place, Chifley Tower, Aurora Place, and Governor Philip Tower tower over the Royal Botanic Gardens. However, it's at night that these buildings truly come to life. And finally, some overviews of the city. Special thanks goes out to all the various creators at 3D Warehouse, as many buildings here were imported from there (too many to list). If you're interested, just search "Sydney" there and you'll find many of the same models I used - you'll need to have basic gmax/3dsmax knowledge to get the model into the game however, but it isn't very difficult. The highway system is modular, for an insight of how I created it and the process behind it, please take a look at the comments section of my "City Overview" and "Night Scenes" ST challenge entries. A pic illustrating how I set it up and some of the pieces in game can be seen here. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  25. Tour of Africa: Southern Africa

    The tour of Africa continues on as we visit the rolling hillsides of southern Zimbabwe. For as far as we can see, small villages dot the landscape - and the locals have lived in mud and thatched roof huts like these for thousands of years. Small plots of farmland are seen throughout the countryside - providing the locals just enough for them and their families. As we move west, we venture through a very different kind of landscape: the swampy marshlands of the Okavango Delta. This massive inland delta is unlike any other place on earth - and the wildlife is equally incredible. You can find massive herds of elephants, wildebeest, lions, zebras, and countless other species - so we get on a boat and get as close as we can. Further west is one of Africa's natural wonders - the harsh Namib Desert. You won't find too many settlements here, as the elements are far too inhospitable - but you still might find the occasional mining village, as this region is one of the world's largest diamond exporters. The former diamond mining town of Kolmanskop in southern Namibia had an unfortunate fate - once a rich little village, the entire area was abandoned once larger deposits were found closer to the shoreline. Nature soon took over, and many of the houses here are starting to fill up with sand. While today, the entire city remains a popular tourist attraction - its unknown how long it will last until its completely lost to the Namib. We move back south into South Africa - and we're sure to visit one of the most beautiful destinations in the entire continent - the vineyards of Franschhoek. Centuries old farms complete with Dutch architecture makes this one of the most charming places we visit on our tour - and there's few ways better way to spend a weekend than going out and tasting some of the local wines. Further south is where you'll find the legislative capital of South Africa - Cape Town. With a population of nearly 4 million, this is one of the largest metropolitan areas in all of Africa - and much of the city is surrounded by townships (slums). The locals have to deal with poor housing conditions and poverty - not to mention the polluting factories that dump waste right into the surrounding rivers and streams. The defining feature of Cape Town isn't an office building or any other man made structure - but instead the stunning Table Mountain that serves as one of the world's best backdrops. Its stunning any time of the day - but when the clouds and fog start to roll over the top and into the city, there's few places that are as magical. Travel some 700 miles east along the Drakensberg Mountains and you'll uncover another one of South Africa's incredible natural wonders... Tugela Falls majestically cascades some 2,972 feet down The Amphitheater, a stunning geological feature which contains some of the world's most impressive cliff faces. To get here will require days and days of hiking - but considering its widely regarded as having some of the world's greatest views from the top - its certainly worth it. The world's second tallest waterfall certainly doesn't disappoint - and it serves as the perfect end to our tour of Southern Africa. (No photoshop used - the cliffs are a custom mod of mine which can be found here. The .gif is 12MB - might take a bit to load) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Johannesburg" Big thanks to @NielsC007, @TMTS, @sucram17, @Akallan, @BC Canuck, @Elenphor, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @mattb325, @kschmidt, @Tonraq, @GoKingsGo, @Marushine, @kingofsimcity, @Namiko, @weixc812, @Toby Ferrian, @TekindusT, @Fantozzi, @raynev1, @nRVOUS, @bobolee, @RandyE, @Fargo, @Yarahi, @Jonas_Chaves, @Manuel-ito, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, @CorinaMarie, @RobertLM78, & @_Michael for all the likes!
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