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      Intermittent Hosted Content Errors   01/09/2018

      Our files host is experiencing service degradation atm. This means some STEX files will not download and will toss a 504 error. It could also mean avatars, attached images and such might appear to go missing. We apologize for the inconvenience. The best we can recommend if you get the file download error is to try again at a later time.

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Found 156 results

  1. The Village

    Replies: Kim Sunwoo: It get's a little better in this entry. Urban Constanta: Thank you very much! Krasner: This old dog is still learning new tricks. kingofsimcity: Cheers! The next step is merging diggis river pieces with his pond pieces to create lakes and/or reservoirs. kschmidt: Thanks a lot! The next phase is creating grid-busting villages which largely consist of MMPs. Linoa06: I created a river to add an interesting boundary to the fields, every field I created is influenced by that river. Simmer2: And those dry stone walls have already been put to good use. Thanks! MiCephia: Thank you. Also good luck with your MMP experiments. Tyberius06: SC4L0ver: Wait until you see my landscaping work for hills, mountains, lakes and rivers- that will be for my next SC4 project. Akallan: Yes- I am increasingly using MMPs and focusing more on rural scenes and suburban scenes. While in future my urban scenes will include additional MMP flourishes. Entry 15: The Village About three months ago I worked on a small row of houses which were off the road and used MMPs for the surroundings. I came back to this two days ago and this time I produced a small village. 1. The area in question. 2. More track grid-busting. 3. I used girafe's bushes for hedgerows. 4. 5. Making use of Simmer2's Dry Stone Walls, found here- http://sc4devotion.com/csxlex/lex_filedesc.php?lotGET=3566. 6. The village- off the grid and filled with MMPs! 7. Simmer2's walls are also useful for property demarcation. This idea came about because lone houses in the Pennines, or in the Lake Distract, often have stone walls to mark the edges of the property and the land. 8. Since the properties are rural, quite a few of them have some kind of greenhouse or patch to grow vegetables (or personal crops ). 9. A little mosaic for today! 10. Here is the northern route into the village. It is the main one. 11. Minus the stone wall at the bottom right corner, everything you see here is 100% MMP. 12. Someone please page simmaster07 -- we need to place MMPs on streets/roads/railways ASAP! 13. Despite this limitation I am happy with the final result. 14. Another overview of the new area I created. There will be more close-ups when I start the large tour around Pololomia. For now though these pictures shall suffice. 15. Dem details! Right now I am working my ass off finishing off as many fields as I can during my one week holiday. There will be another entry next week. After that Pololomia should be done and the grand tour can commence.
  2. More Rural Development!

    Replies: kschmidt: Cheers! rathefalcon: Everything I do with these city tiles is to create rural/urban transitions. Prophet42: UrbanConstanta: Did you manage to download those fields? TekindusT: Worth the price of admission! Kim Sunwoo: I call that mosaic the city centre to rural transition. simbasc4: Thank you very much! Entry 14: More Rural Development So this month has been a busy one, but in the last two days I have been working some more on Pololomia and finishing off areas to the north. I reckon finishing every area could take anywhere between a month and six weeks given all the MMPs I am using, but it is slowly coming together. 1. Gridbusting on a MASSIVE scale. 2. I'm experimenting with mixed field/woodland areas. 3. Rural areas in England often have many fields with patches of woodland throw in the middle. 4. While Diggis river extension pieces form great boundaries for the fields. 5. And the river banks are SO MMP-able. 6. Another feature of English farmland is the line of trees bordering fields. 7. The other thing I am developing is a better blending of tracks with the dirt perimeter of fields. 8. And a new MMP farm combo (using Chrisadams3997's RRP MMPs): wild white flowers combined with clover textures. Throw in ionionion's OMCo brown dirt and we have a rich, organic field! 9. And a close-up of that field. 10. Rivers make for the most interesting boundaries... Sometimes the fields will be bordering the river banks and other times there is a clear separation between river banks and fields. 11. By using the wide version of Heblem's gravel MMPs, and placing it in the centre between two lines of gravel MMPs, it gives the tracks a rough boundary- which helps them better blend into the landscape. 12. While the field edges look dirty and as messy as possible, which is just the look I'm going for with plowed fields. 13. Another overview of the area I'm working on. 14. 15. Simmer2's stone paths MMPs are SO good! Plus this is another exercise in varying MMP densities: high to the left, medium by the river and low to the right. 16. Blending the street, river, diagonal fillers and MMPs all together in one cohesive package. 17. Fields must be YUGE! 18. And with that I will end this entry. Next entry- next week? Two weeks from now? See you then.
  3. The New Year's Entry

    Replies: kschmidt: Thank you very much! sejr99999: Cheers! matias93: MMP textures can compliment terrain sometimes but I am currently sticking with Gobias' Sudden Valley terrain mod. kingofsimcity: Thanks! Expect more of those cross-town mosaics in future entries. SC4L0ver: Thanks! Last year I finally got the field dimensions and the field transitions/boundaries/fillers correct. I also nailed the urban/rural transition with a combined MMP/lot approach. This year there will be a lot more of that. Krasner: Bipin: Your BATs and LOTs have been invalueable for my industrial and rural areas. Akallan: The circular fields are an incredible piece of texture work! Urban Constanta: I think you need to be a member of SC4D to be able to download the circular fields. The New Year's Entry Propelling the URS firmly into 2018 we shall start with a special entry which features the latest areas I have been developing in Pololomia, it combines two of my favourite things: farms and industry. And what does 2018 hold? Well the first two or three months will be covering Pololomia. There will be some smaller side projects during Spring and early Summer where I will experiment even further with MMPs, LOTs and BATs. During the Summer Holidays I will be working on a new large city tile; perhaps something intensely urban but throwing in a lot of MMPs to an urban setting... With that said let us start with... 1. The top half of the picture contains the new areas I have been working on. 2. 3. 4. Mixing old and new. 5. The new is Simmer2's fantastic Royal Flush business / (industrial building)- http://sc4devotion.com/csxlex/lex_filedesc.php?lotGET=3556. 6. Mid-rise or low-rise sprawling industrial units are so important for getting industrial density right. 7. I have shown something similar in this area before, but now I've added the perimeter of dirt around the MMP fields. It's adds an important messy element to fields which is lacking from ploppable fields. 8. And this is the new industrial area I completed. This was tricky as I needed to blend large-scale industry with rural buildings, woodland and fields. 9. 10. 11. A return of the threshold photoshopped pictures! 12. The urban/rural transition can be summed up as follows: a line of trees/lots, some kind of fencing, a dirt perimeter and then MMP fields. 13. A small village just north of the new industrial area I created. 14. Another thing I was working on last year was the rural intersection and rural turnoffs to tracks and dirt paths... 15. Bipin's grunge industrial roads (found here- http://sc4devotion.com/csxlex/lex_filedesc.php?lotGET=3086) are really useful because their pavement textures consist of concrete which enables more realistic road/driveway transitions. 16. I am now experimenting with MMP bushes to border fields- this is a very British feature of rural areas. 17. The rural track. Using Bipin's grunge roads makes the transition between the track and the road almost seamless. 18. The first large mosaic. Most of my efforts go towards seamless transitions from urban to rural areas, villages to fields, industrial sites to rural/farm areas. 19. The MEGA mosaic. This is the complete transition from city centre, to inner city area, to suburbs, to city outskirts to eventually fields and countryside. 20. And one final picture. Next weekend there will be another entry!
  4. New York City

    After taking a look at historic New York City - we'll take a look at this incredible city in the modern day. The Statue of Liberty is one of New York City's most iconic landmarks - originally bronze when it was completed in 1886, it turned green over the years due to oxidation and has greeted millions of immigrants coming into the United States. The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the city's most famous landmarks - at the time of its opening in 1883, it was the world's longest suspension bridge and quickly became known across the globe. Lower Manhattan boasts some of the world's most incredible skyscrapers. In the early 1900s, Art Deco high rises like the incredible Woolworth Building dominated the skyline, and the entire area quickly became an important financial and business hub. Today, Lower Manhattan continues to grow upwards with buildings like the World Trade Center complex after the original twin towers fell on September 11th, 2001. Snowy days can be quite stunning in New York City - especially among the high rises of Midtown Manhattan. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is one of the city's most unique and beautiful buildings - designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, it's been a popular attraction since its opening in 1959. Since its opening in 1857, Central Park has been an oasis in the heart of the city and one of its most popular destinations. The United Nations Headquarters was completed in 1952 by architects Oscar Niemeyer and Le Corbusier. The complex has served as the official world headquarters of the UN ever since. Madison Square Garden is one of New York City's most famous venues - from professional basketball, hockey, boxing, concerts, and more - there's always something going on here. The Empire State Building was opened in 1931 - standing 1,250 feet tall, it has remained an icon of the city ever since and is particularly striking at night. A mosaic of Midtown Manhattan at night - one of the world's most awe-inspiring skylines. Thanks once again to everyone for your support throughout the course of 2017! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "Historic New York City" Thanks @SimRico, @9gruntsand1hammer, @Urban Constanta, @matias93, @art128, @RobertLM78, @Tyberius06, @simmaster07, @Odainsaker, @kingofsimcity, @nRVOUS, @gviper, @bobolee,@Probidence, @redfox85, @CorinaMarie, @JP Schriefer, @Fargo, @Silur, @tonyr, @scotttbarry, @bladeberkman, @PaulSawyer, @gigius76, @jakis, @Manuel-ito, @ESP15, @Toby Ferrian, @Handyman, @Elenphor, @mike_oxlong, @aegian, @Finnbhennach, @The British Sausage, @Akallan, @Jonas_Chaves, @RandyE, @kim026, @raynev1, @Tonraq, @Ling Ziming, & @rathefalcon for all the likes!
  5. Mosaics & Bonus Pictures

    Mosaics & Bonus Pictures A collection of some of my favorite buildings and cities from across the globe that didn't make it into other updates this year - enjoy! The Grand Canal Venice, Italy Commerzbank Tower Frankfurt, Germany Shanghai World Financial Center Shanghai, China Tokyo Skytree Tokyo, Japan Transamerica Pyramid San Francisco, California, USA Downtown Chicago And finally, a couple more mosaics and panoramas from Sydney. Every New Year's Eve, Sydney is home to one of the world's most amazing fireworks displays. Its truly a sight to behold. Note: As with a number of my other updates, lots of custom models had to be imported into the game from various sites like 3d warehouse. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Canada" Thanks to @redfox85, @Toby Ferrian, @matias93, @Manuel-ito, @Dgmc2013, @Fantozzi, @SC4L0ver, @bladeberkman, @art128, @PaulSawyer, @bobolee, @Tonraq, @Ducio, @scotttbarry, @CorinaMarie, @RobertLM78, @Handyman, @raynev1, @Haljackey, @mike_oxlong, @RandyE, @jakis, @Ling Ziming, @mrsmartman, @MAW, @_Michael, @kingofsimcity, @Simmer2, @Silur, @MandelSoft, @Tyberius06, @Finnbhennach, @juliok92012, @JP Schriefer, & @Oerk for all the likes!
  6. A Special Christmas Present

    Replies: _Michael: Thanks for that! I did what you said for my mosaics and it worked! SC4L0ver: There's A LOT more rural scenes coming! Prophet42: I am on a roll and I still find new ways to make these rural scenes and still find little improvements to better the quality. Anyway, ErnestMaxis created this MMP set which has all sorts- the gazebo is actually an MMP. The set can be found here, but DEPENDENCIES galore! http://sc4devotion.com/csxlex/lex_filedesc.php?lotGET=3493 Bluthlucidity: To answer your question I plop in some RCI buildings and grow others. Though nearly all commercial and industrial buildings are plopped, while some of the residential buildings are plopped. Though I'm not sure how to answer your second question- do you want me to make my plugins available to download??? Anyway, thanks for your comment! buckbeach47: Thank you very much for your comments and for showing me the 3RR Exchange- this entry came about thanks to those circular fields. So thanks! gunkz32: Cheers! There's a lot more where that came from. aegian: To answer your question- no. But there are several SC4 Gods who produce scenes like this but with a very different style- Korver, Huston, SimCoug, Paeng, Fasan, Vortext, etc. A few times you will see people make the Google Maps comment for the bunch I mentioned! Entry 12: A Special Christmas Present!!! Note: this entry is dedicated to buckbeach47 for showing me the 3RR Exchange and these amazing circular irrigation fields. It's Christmas Day and since I now have a two-week Christmas Holiday (one of the perks of being a teacher) I have some time to finish off Pololomia and the surrounding rural areas. In this entry I show you the latest areas I have been working on and there are some goodies- including two MEGA-Mosaics. 1. To immediately answer your question about the circular fields, they can be found on the 3RR Exchange on SC4D. (Link here- http://sc4devotion.com/forums/index.php?topic=5603.0) 2. This circular field comes on a 24x24 lot, the outsides have this dirt texture which can be MMPed over. 3. 4. There is also a smaller 12x12 version. 5. 6. Here I go full-on 100% MMP saturation. 7. 8. 9. I have redone the area around the petrol station; small buildings by the intersection. 10. As a new feature I now add a small dirt perimeter around my MMP fields. It makes them a little messier but in a good way I think. 11. Beyond Pololomia are a series of small villages close to the outskirts. 12. In the last two years I have become more and more interested in creating smaller scenes, rural scenes, village scenes... 13. Big skyscrapers and all that jazz now bores me. 14. I am much more interested in rural/urban transitions, villages and of course mid-rise scenes (such as the city centre in Pololomia). 15. The idea behind this field is that it has been heavily used by farm animals- the grass has been completely devoured in places but the farmer keeps on using it for convenience. 16. The same field but nearly all of the grass is intact. 17. And here is my attempt at minimal MMP saturation- which is surprising hard to get right! Moderate MMP saturation is even harder because there can never be enough MMPs... 18. This picture shows part of two dedicated animal herding routes- the ones that are all dirty, dusty and brown. I would say this is moderate MMP saturation. 19. MEGA-Mosaic 1. All of my time and effort goes towards creating realistic rural/urban transitions. 20. MEGA-Mosaic 2. If you ever wonder why I take so long to finish my cities it's only because I want to show you scenes like this! 21. Anyway, next week I will show you some more updates. But right now I am loving the rural areas I'm creating; I would say I love creating rural areas more than creating industrial areas. Enjoy this entry and enjoy the Christmas Holidays!
  7. Canada

    After taking a look at Toronto, today we'll be touring the rest of Canada, another one of the world's most beautiful countries. Our tour starts off on the Eastern shores, in the Newfoundland province. The small town of Red Island Harbour is quite picturesque - and the locals here make their living off some of the richest fishing grounds in the world, the Grand Banks. Wintertime can be quite beautiful - if you're lucky, you might get to see a unique wonder that rarely occurs across the globe: pancake ice. We travel south to Nova Scotia - where lighthouses dot the coastlines. One of the most famous ones is Peggy's Point Lighthouse - built in 1868, it's one of the areas most famous landmarks and one of Canada's most photographed lighthouses. Our next stop is Quebec City. Located on the banks of the Saint Lawrence River, Quebec's capital is one of the most historic cities in all of Canada, and in fact is the only North American fortified city north of Mexico whose walls still exist. It's most famous landmark however is the stunning Château Frontenac - built in 1893, this grand hotel is one of Canada's most spectacular buildings. Not too far away is Montréal, the most populous city in Canada's Quebec province and the second largest city in the country. After Paris, it's the largest primarily French-speaking city in the world. Since it's founding as a small colony on Montréal Island back in 1642, it's transformed into an international metropolis ever since. Our next destination is the capital of Canada - Ottawa. The centerpiece of the city is Parliament Hill, an impressive collection of buildings which house the Parliament of Canada. Our next stop will be on Canada's southern border with the United States - where we'll get to see one of Canada's most amazing natural wonders, Horseshoe Falls. At night, these famous falls are illuminated in a rainbow of colors, turning the whole area into a spectacular light show. We travel into Manitoba where we'll take a look at it's largest city and capital - Winnipeg. Known as the "Gateway to the West", the city is a railway and transportation hub and has a vibrant downtown area. Canada's great prairies are superb for farming - and have made Saskatchewan known as the breadbasket of Canada. Small rural farms like this one can be seen virtually everywhere. We head into Alberta, stopping in the "Gateway to the North" - Edmonton. This city of nearly 1 million is home to one of North America's northernmost skylines, filled with highrises like the 441 ft tall ATB Place (formerly known as the Telus Plaza). Our next stop will be in Northern Alberta - in the city of Fort McMurray. Due to its location near valuable oil sands, massive industrial complexes have sprung up and smokestacks can be seen for miles around. We head north, venturing into the Arctic - visiting the capital of the Northwest Territories, Yellowknife. Located on the northern shore of Great Slave Lake, it's the only city for hundreds of miles around - and wintertime can be especially brutal here. The YK Centre sign has been an icon in the city for decades, tracking the frigid temperatures. With temps reaching as low as -51 C - make sure you dress warmly! As we travel further north into Nunavut, the temperatures drop even further - the local Inuit hunters who live here make igloos their home, and have done so for thousands of years. They do a great job of shielding them from the elements - and from the occasional nosy polar bear, too... Iqaluit is Nunavut's capital - its a city filled with simple yet beautiful architecture. Colorful houses and unique structures like the igloo-shaped St. Jude's Cathedral make this city of 7,700 people stand out. Iqaluit's name literally means "many fishes" - and has long been a prominent fishing location, but stocks have been declining in recent years. We travel back south, and along the shores of Great Bear Lake is where we'll see one of Canada's most awe-inspiring sights - the Northern Lights. Also known as Aurora borealis, these colorful lights in the sky are the result of electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth's atmosphere. Our last stop in the Arctic is the Mackenzie River delta - where we'll get to see one of Canada's most unique natural wonders, the Pingo. These mounds of soil are filled with a core of expanding ice and usually a small pool of water at the top - and when the ice melts, the pingo collapses. Their name originates from Inuvialuktun word for "small hill" - and can reach huge diameters, sometimes as many 2,000 feet wide. Our next stop is Calgary - the largest city in Alberta and home of the Calgary Stampede. The city's skyline has seen expansive growth in recent years - giving it one of the most impressive skylines in all of Canada. The towers of Eigth Avenue Place (completed in 2011 and 2014) rise above the city - they're some of Canada's most spectacular skyscrapers. For those wanting to get away from it all, there's no better place than the Canadian Rockies. Stunning lakes like Moraine Lake are nestled between pristine forests and towering peaks - and their turquoise color (caused by glacial flour) is truly mesmerizing. We make our way to Canada's western coast, stopping to take a look at some of the totem poles that dot the shorelines. The ones here at Stanley Park in Vancouver are one of the country's most visited tourist attractions, and are one of the most recognizable cultural symbols of Western Canada. Our last stop in Western Canada will be Vancouver's downtown - it's one of Canada's best, filled with sleek and modern buildings like the Bentall Centre. Despite a little rain, it's truly one of Canada's most beautiful cities. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "New Zealand" Thanks to @Handyman, @Dgmc2013, @PaulSawyer, @Edvarz, @redfox85, @CorinaMarie, @JP Schriefer, @_Michael, @Jonas_Chaves, @BruceTedder, @Urban Constanta, @RobertLM78, @bobolee, @bladeberkman, @Odainsaker, @art128, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @Manuel-ito, @Toby Ferrian, @jakis, @Bastet69008, @mrsmartman, @Elenphor, @raynev1, @nRVOUS, @Ling Ziming, @Tonraq, @Finnbhennach, @Tyberius06, & @Oerk for all the likes!
  8. New Zealand

    Today we'll be taking a look at one of the world's most beautiful countries - New Zealand. With geysers, mountains, fjords, and waterfalls dotting the landscape - along with some of the of the world's most beautiful cities - any trip here is truly unforgettable. We'll start off in the countryside on the South Island - with the sheep population outnumbering people 7 to 1 - expect to see sheep and plenty of them for as far as the eye can see. You may get stuck in a traffic jam or two here as well.. New Zealand is a land of incredible natural wonders, and one of its most beautiful destinations can be found deep in Fiordland National Park. Cascading 1,904 feet from Lake Quill, there's really no other place on Earth like the incredible Sutherland Falls. Further north in Fiordland National Park is another one of New Zealand's wonders - Milford Sound. This incredibly grand fiord is a natural treasure, with towering peaks and pristine forests surrounding its shores. Not surprisingly, the fiord is a popular cruise ship destination as well. Our last stop on the South Island is none other than New Zealand's tallest point - 12,218 foot tall Mount Cook. The Maoris of the Ngai Tahu tribe who live here believe the mountain has a sacred connection as well - Aoraki (as its referred to in their language) is believed to be the most sacred of ancestors from which they descend. New Zealand is also a land of geysers - and some of the most amazing ones can be found in Rotorua. The famed Pohutu Geyser erupts up to 20 times a day - at heights up to 100 feet tall - making it one of the most popular attractions in the area. Our last stop will be in New Zealand's largest city - Auckland. Founded back in 1840, it's served as an important industrial and business center ever since, as well as being one of the chief seaports in the region. The skyline is home to a variety of stunning buildings - but they're all dwarfed by the magnificent Sky Tower. Rising 722 feet above the city, the observation deck offers some truly incredible views of the city - and if you're brave enough, bungee jumping as well. St. Patrick's Cathedral in the heart of downtown is one of the most beautiful sights in the city. The ANZ Centre is the city's third tallest skyscraper - rising 469 feet tall, it was the city's tallest building when completed in 1991. Some overviews of Auckland's stunning skyline. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Toronto" Thanks to @JP Schriefer, @Tonraq, @Haljackey, @redfox85, @Edvarz, @bobolee, @tariely, @CorinaMarie, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @art128, @Toby Ferrian, @Dgmc2013, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @Manuel-ito, @PaulSawyer, @Ling Ziming, @GenericUser, @BruceTedder, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, @jakis, @Bastet69008, @SC4L0ver, @feyss, @rathefalcon, @sucram17, @Akallan, @Elenphor, @Ducio, @Wallibuk, @Urban Constanta, @RobertLM78, & @Jonas Chaves for all the likes!
  9. Video Montage of Pololomia

    Replies: Dukestoner: _Michael: Nothing has really changed... Except I have a few more useful toys at my disposal: mass plopping of residential and buildings with transparent ground textures. kelistmac: Yeah, I create a general urban style which is part USA, part European and part UK. Abrams124: I am. Simmer2: Cheers! Tyberius06: New start, new CJ- thanks for your comment. Akallan: It's all about seamless transitions and the right ground textures. feyss: Thanks! I never thought of placing that diagonal warehouse on the side of Bipin's Grunge Industrial road corner- until now. Entry 10 - A Video Montage of Pololomia And now I present one of the most realistic-looking SC4 videos you will ever see on Youtube. I recommend cinema mode - 1080p for best quality. And as a bonus some more pictures too! 1. Another small city block I've finished- the one surrounded by the posh fences. 2. The ortho/diagonal mix! 3. The old city buildings meet the new ones. 4. Variations of building density and variations of space/fillers. 5. It's all about the space behind buildings... 6. Infilling city blocks can be a very satisfying thing to do... Next weekend- a rural update.
  10. Hong Kong

    Today we're taking a look at Hong Kong - this global financial hub and port city boasts one of the world's most stunning and recognizable skylines. This city was originally under British rule for 99 years - but in 1997 it returned to China and now is a special administrative region (SAR). We're starting off in Kowloon - located on the mainland across Victoria Harbor, it's well known for its markets and endless apartments. The streets are constantly crowded, it's an area that's always filled with energy and activity. Hankow Road is one of Kowloon's most famous roads - with countless signs and advertisements crowding the streets, its one of the city's most distinctive sights. Tian Tan Buddha is one of Hong Kong's most famous attractions and offers incredible views of the city. Since it's opening in 1993, it has become well known in the city as a symbol of Buddhism and nature. At night, the skyline of Hong Kong is even more amazing. Here we take a look at the Bank of China Tower - one of Hong Kong's most distinctive and remarkable buildings. Standing 1,205 feet tall, it was Hong Kong and Asia's tallest building for two years after its completion in 1990. The 1,227 foot tall Central Plaza is another one of the city's most beautiful skyscrapers, it originally opened in 1992 and overtook the Bank of China Tower as the city's tallest until 2003. In 2003, Two International Finance Center was completed and overtook Central Plaza as the city's tallest at the time, standing 1,352 feet tall. Another one of Hong Kong's most famous skyscrapers can be seen close by as well - The Center was completed in 1998 and is currently the city's 5th tallest with a height of 1,135 feet tall. Hong Kong's tallest building is the International Commerce Centre - rising 1,538 feet tall, this incredible building took nearly 8 years to build and was finally completed in 2010. It's currently the world's 10th tallest building, and the views from the top are truly extraordinary. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Berlin (Pt. 2/2)" Thanks to @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @RandyE, @jakis, @_Michael, @The British Sausage, @matias93, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @bobolee, @mike_oxlong, @Dgmc2013, @mattb325,@Jonas_Chaves, @scotttbarry, @MushyMushy, @SC4L0ver, @raynev1, @Lazarou Monkey Terror, @mrsmartman, @BruceTedder, @Elenphor, & @Finnbhennach for all the likes!
  11. Highlights of Pololomia

    Replies: Akallan: Thank you! Anyway the URS is what I wanted from SC4 a year or two ago; 2016 had some great stuff but I can now go even further than that with residential plopping and creating lots with transparent tiles with buildings upon them. Prophet42: Cheers! It's getting easier and easier to detail city areas and give them a certain character to them. BC Canuck: Steal those ideas! If you're wondering the British Sausage is a famous joke from the British TV series Yes Minister. tariely: Oh yeah! Michelle Yukimura: I go to GIMP and use the horizontal flip tool. sejr99999: Thanks! And good luck with your search. metarvo: Yeah the diagonals were a give-away; I am a madman when it comes to creating seamless diagonals and removing jagged texture edges on roads. kelistmac: Make some - ahem! - contributions for the mayor and that house is yours. feyss: Thanks! Entry 9: Highlights from Pololomia In this entry there are some more pictures from Pololomia. I think I can get the whole city tile done by Christmas holiday time. Thanks a lot for the comments- it is good to be back. Anyway, enjoy the pictures and the enjoy the weekend. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.
  12. Berlin (Pt. 2/2)

    Our trip to Berlin resumes with a visit to another one of its oldest and most famous landmarks - Brandenburg Gate. Opened in 1791, it was built on orders by Prussian king Frederick William II to commemorate the restoration of the country after the early Batavian Revolution. It's amazed locals and tourists alike ever since. The Gendarmenmarkt is one of the city's most famous squares, constantly filled with action. With its historic twin cathedrals on both sides, Französischer Dom and Deutscher Dom, its a sight you won't want to miss. Deutscher Dom at night. A view of the streets of Berlin - with one of its most famous avenues, the Unter Den Linden cutting across towards the top. Staatsbibliothek is a prominent universal library constructed in 1903, located on the famous Unter Den Linden. At night time, it's truly spectacular. Unter Den Linden from above. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Berlin (Pt. 1/2)" Thanks to @MushyMushy, @jakis, @RandyE, @matias93, @CorinaMarie, @Zerx, @SC4L0ver, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @_Michael, @mrsmartman, @TekindusT, @Toby Ferrian, @kingofsimcity, @bobolee, @feyss, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @The British Sausage, @nos.17, @raynev1, @Elenphor, @mattb325, & @Akallan for all the likes!
  13. Scenes from the City

    Replies: SC4L0ver: Thanks! The woodland was an idea that came to me after travelling along the A66 west- random clumps of woodland in the field or on the field's perimeter. Prophet42: I would say that wild meadow scenery would work well for unused green areas inside of cities. kelistmac: The prop pox was a bummer but it was a chance to carve the right suburban/rural outline for the city. So it was a net positive. Akallan: The British Sausage is simply a pseudonym for Ln X- that's why the style is so similar. What happened was I lost everything (computer problems, think blue screen of death) and Imageshack acted up- something about payment and accessing the account. Very embarrassing! So I was left with a CJ with no pictures and vacant image links. So I decided for a fresh start: new account, rebuilt plugins, new username, new CJ, etc. Entry 8: Scenes from the City Some of these pictures feature new areas, some are different shots of older areas. And now these pictures come with a little photoshop sparkle. In any case enjoy them! 1. 2. Going full on diagonal! 3. 4. Plop in some texture tiles to make those overhanging buildings blend in! 5. 6. MMP playground. 7. One of Pololomia's major roundabouts. 8. 9. 10. It's all about the areas behind buildings... 11. 12. Next week will bring another update, but this one will have more rural scenes. See you then.
  14. Berlin (Pt. 1/2)

    After taking a look at Rome in the last couple of updates, we're now taking a look at another one of Europe's great cities - the capital of Germany, Berlin. The city is filled with famous monuments - and the first couple that we'll visit are located on the banks of the Spree River. The Alte Nationalgalerie (the long museum at the top of the picture) was opened in 1876 and houses an impressive collection of artwork and is one of the city's most popular attractions. The Berliner Dom towards the bottom part of the mosaic was opened in 1905 and is one of Europe's most impressive cathedrals. Berliner Dom at night. The Victory Column (Siegessaule) and its roundabout can be found in the Tiergarten - opened in 1873, it was built to commemorate the Prussian victory in the Danish-Prussian War. The Reichstag was originally opened in 1894 to house the German Empire's Imperial Diet. A massive fire in the 1930s along with damage from World War II led to the structure falling into disuse as the parliament used other buildings in the city. Eventually, it was partially refurbished in the 1960s and had an entire renovation in the 1990s, giving it a unique, modern look. The building once again is home to the German parliament. Rotes Rathaus (Red Town Hall) is another one of the city's most famous landmarks - opened in 1869, it serves as the home of the mayor and the government of the Federal state of Berlin. The Fernsehturm TV Tower is Berlin's most prominent landmark - rising 1,198 feet tall, its the tallest building in Germany. The views from the top are truly extraordinary. Fernsehturm is located close to Alexanderplatz - one of the city's most famous squares and one of its most vital transport hubs for over 100 years. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Rome (Pt. 2/2)" Thanks to @scotttbarry, @Akallan, @Tonraq, @Mr Saturn64, @Jonas_Chaves, @bobolee, @raynev1, @Simmer2, @matias93, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @_Michael, @Toby Ferrian, @tariely, @redfox85, @CorinaMarie, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @Odainsaker, @Manuel-ito, & @jakis for all the likes!
  15. Rome (Pt. 2/2)

    Our tour of Rome continues on with one of the world's most famous buildings - the Colosseum. Opened in A.D. 80 and seating more than 50,000 spectators, this impressive arena was home to countless gladiator fights for more than 400 years. While a good portion of the structure has been lost throughout the centuries, there's still plenty left to explore - making it one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city. Once the heart and marketplace of the city, today the Roman Forum lies in a sprawling heap of ruins. With likes of Julius Caesar and Mark Antony once walking across these grounds - there's history everywhere you go. The entire complex was abandoned shortly after the fall of the Roman Empire and quickly fell into a state of disrepair - much of the stone here was used by the locals, leaving many of the legendary temples incomplete. Finally, near the end of the 18th century, large scale excavations started to take place, preserving this legendary landmark. The entire complex remains sunken under the street level - the result of countless excavations over the years. One of the most beautiful and romantic spots in all of Rome is the heart-shaped Villa Borghese park, located in the center of the city. The Giardino del Lago (Lake Garden) is a popular destination - there's no better way to spend a day than renting a boat and rowing across these peaceful waters. With cherry trees dotting much of the park - spring is a truly magical time of year here. The next stop is the Verano Cemetery - a spot with plenty of history as many famous people have been buried here over the centuries. Since it's founding in the early 19th century, its been one of the cities most important cemeteries ever since. Just behind St. Peter's Square in The Vatican lies the stunning dome of St. Peter's Basilica - standing 448 feet tall, it's by far the tallest historic building in the area. Regarded by many as being one of the holiest Catholic shrines on the face of the planet - it's been the traditional burial site for popes and other important religious figures since the 10th century. To this day, the structure remains a place of pilgrimage - with the pope making common appearances for liturgies. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: Just for clarification - the roads in these Rome updates are made up of either MMPs, Lot Editor textures (like around St. Peter's Basilica), or just a massive texture on a prop (like the Colosseum). They were not "photoshopped in" - and neither were the buildings (most were existing BATs on the STEX/LEX, and a few were custom BATs that I got from 3d warehouse, exported them, and used in the game). --- Previous Update: "Rome (Pt. 1/2)" Thanks to @Tyberius06, @Fantozzi, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @gigius76, @Silur, @Manuel-ito, @huzman, @jakis, @CorinaMarie, @mike_oxlong, @Toby Ferrian, @mrsmartman, @tariely, @_Michael, @bobolee, @matias93, @raynev1, @Jonas_Chaves, @MushyMushy, @The British Sausage, @redfox85, @Mr Saturn64, @SC4L0ver, & @Krasner for all the likes and reactions
  16. Rome (Pt. 1/2)

    After taking a look at Ancient Rome - we'll now take a look at this incredible city in the modern day. Our trip to Rome begins with a trip to one of Rome's most famous squares - the stunning Piazza Navona. This square dates back from the 1st century CE, and was originally the site of many great athletic games over the years. Today, it serves as the perfect gathering place for locals and tourists alike. Rome has nearly 2,000 fountains - but perhaps the most impressive of them all is the incredible Trevi Fountain. This baroque masterpiece was completed in 1762 and has been one of the most popular destinations in the city ever since. It's been said that if you throw a coin into the pool with your right hand over your left shoulder - you'll ensure a trip back to Rome in the future. Perhaps the most well preserved building of Ancient Rome, the Pantheon remains to this day as a temple to the Roman Gods. The circular oculus at the top allows light to enter, as well as the rain and any other natural elements. While there's numerous ways to get to the Pantheon, you can't go wrong with the time-tested solution: a horse drawn carriage through the streets of Rome. Located entirely inside of Rome, The Vatican might be the world's smallest country, but it holds many treasured landmarks. St. Peter's Square is one of the world's most famous squares - it's 283 columns, standing 55 feet tall each are truly unmistakable. Papal audiences are held here regularly, drawing big crowds - but its Easter and Christmas Masses are by far the largest, drawing tourists from the world over. On a steep hillside in the heart of Ancient Rome is where you'll find one of the world's most famous staircases - the Spanish Steps. These 135 steps connect the Piazza di Spagna (Spanish Square) at the bottom to the Trinità dei Monti church at the top - and making the climb is something that you won't want to miss. The millions of tourists over the years making the climb hasn't come without a price, however. With the staircase falling into a state of disrepair, with weeds and cracks taking over - a multi-million dollar restoration was called for and recently completed. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Roman Empire (Pt. 3/3)" Thanks to @MushyMushy, @CorinaMarie, @RandyE, @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @kingofsimcity, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Chief ZDN, @jakis, @TekindusT, @mrsmartman, @huzman, @The British Sausage, @Marushine, @bobolee, @Maloskero, @Elenphor, @Odainsaker, @tonyr, @mattb325, @Finnbhennach, & @Manuel-ito for all the likes!
  17. Roman Empire (Pt. 3/3)

    For our last chapter of the Roman Empire - we're taking a look at the fall of the Empire. While the Roman Empire was still growing, close attention had to be paid to its borders to make sure invaders wouldn't get in - a sign of things perhaps to come. Hadrian's Wall was initially opened in 128 in Britain to make sure that various tribes couldn't make their way inside. By the 200s and 300s though, the Roman Empire was clearly in a state of great decline. In 284 the empire split into two - the Western and Eastern Roman Empires - and the Western Roman Empire was soon in trouble. Rome was left in a vulnerable position and had fallen from power - so capital was moved to Milan and later Ravenna. In 402, an up and coming Visigoth leader - Alaric I - made his was through Italy and was looking to invade as many cities as possible. It didn't end well for him though in the Battle of Verona - as general Stilicho was able to hold him off and force his retreat. Alaric would return however, and swiftly made his way to the weakened former capital of Rome in 410. He led the Sack of Rome - and his men looted whatever they could find. After several previous sackings, Rome a former shell of itself. One more sack in 455 by the Vandals would truly mark the beginning of the end. Rome was left with only a few hundred people - and the rest of the empire was in complete shambles. In 476, Emperor Romulus was deposed by the barbarian Odoacer - marking the end of the Western Roman Empire. While the Western Roman Empire was clearly no more - the Eastern Roman Empire and it's capital of Constantinople would survive and even thrive for nearly 1,000 years afterwards. However, it was in the 1200s that everything started to fall apart. The crusades left the city in a vulnerable position, and the nearby Ottomans could sense it. In 1453, their fearless leader Mehmed II led an army nearly 100,000 strong to the gates of the city, to conquer the city he always dreamed about leading. Constantinople had a famed series of defensive walls running along its perimeter - and it was widely believed that no one would ever make it past. However, a use of new technology would prove to be its downfall. The Ottomans brought up to 70 massive cannons with them, and bombarded the city for 53 straight days. The Byzantines of Constantinople tried their best to continually rebuild the walls - but they were no match for Mehmed II's siege. May 29th, 1453 would mark the end of the Fall of Constantinople - Mehmed's men quickly invaded the city after destroying the walls - looting, pillaging, and destroying what they could find. After 24 hours though, he ordered his men to stop with the city in complete shambles. "What a town this was! And we have allowed it to be destroyed!" proclaimed Mehmed. With Constantinople now in the Ottoman's hands - the last vestige of the Roman Empire was no more. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Roman Empire (Pt. 2/3)" Thanks to @kingofsimcity, @RobertLM78, @Fantozzi, @matias93, @Toby Ferrian, @Manuel-ito, @Krasner, @CorinaMarie, @redfox85, @tonyr, @SC4L0ver, @Celast, @gigius76, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @bobolee, @The British Sausage, @jakis, @raynev1, @Jonas_Chaves, @Mr Saturn64, @nRVOUS, & @Prophet42 for all the likes!
  18. Dealing with Prop Pox!

    Replies: Akallan: Thanks a lot for your comment! Entry 7: Dealing With Prop Pox So all of those great pictures and scenes you saw in the previous have been lost. The reason why is that a week ago Pololomia suffered from Prop Pox. So I had to use an old back-up which is prop pox free- unfortunately it was dated three weeks ago. I haven't added too much in those three weeks, but still... All of those MMP scenes are gone. Oh well... But it did give me a chance to redo the outskirts of Pololomia and I believe I have found a better layout! Anyway enjoy the pictures! 1. Let's start off with a MEGA mosaic! Link to see the big version- https://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/147x907q90/922/Eq1rSx.png 2. More sneak peaks of the city centre. 3. 4. 5. 6. And here is the new layout- look to the top of the picture and the outskirts look WAY better as they have now become less dense and there is more green space between them. Note some of these spaces have now been filled in with MMPs. 7. And now some more MMP goodiness! 8. I redid the FA neighbourhood and made it strictly attached to the road- there are no diagonal streets shooting off. 9. 10. 11. When I went to the Lake District a week ago, I was driving along the A66 and I noticed the layout of the trees amongst the fields: lines of trees for field perimetres, small clumps of woodland in the centre of fields, grassy areas marking the perimeter of a field, etc. 12. This got me thinking about how I could add woodland in the middle of my large MMP fields... 13. 14. A new development in my MMP farm/rural quest- wild meadows! 15. 16. Now THIS is what the rural/urban perimeter of Pololomia is going to look like- the grid meets organic MMPs, diagonal roads and FA roads! There will be another update next week!
  19. Roman Empire (Pt. 2/3)

    Our journey through the ancient Roman Empire continues with a trip to the Roman Forum - constructed shortly after the completion of Caesar's Forum, it plays a vital role in the infancy of the Roman Empire - holding processions, elections, and trials - and also for being one of the most important meeting places in the city. The Circus Maximus is continually improved over the years, and is given its final shape during the reign of Caesar in 46 BCE. The Romans loved chariot racing and for hundreds of years, this site was one of the premier racetracks around. Once fully developed, it became the model for other circuses all throughout the Roman Empire. In 64 CE, much of Rome is devastated in the Great Fire of Rome. Six days of flames ravage the city, destroying many of the city's most prized monuments. The summer winds fanned the flames even more, causing roughly 70% of the city to be left in smouldering ruin. After the Great Fire, much of the city is rebuilt - and couple new grand buildings are built as well. The Colosseum was the most impressive structure of them all, first opening back in 80 CE. The largest amphitheater ever built, it held gladiator fights, mock sea battles, and just about everything else imaginable. Our last sight is The Pantheon - opened in 126 CE, it was one of the city's most important temples to worship the Roman Gods. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Roman Empire (Pt. 1/3)" Thanks to @MisterBlueStar4, @RandyE, @Odainsaker, @scotttbarry, @tonyr, @Finnbhennach, @RobertLM78, @Manuel-ito, @Toby Ferrian, @Celast, @CorinaMarie, @matias93, @gigius76, @mike_oxlong, @SC4L0ver, @Fantozzi, @bobolee, @Simmer2, @Jonas_Chaves, @geminijen, @redfox85, @bladeberkman, @mrsmartman, @kschmidt, @The British Sausage, @Mr Saturn64 for all the likes & reactions!
  20. Roman Empire (Pt. 1/3)

    For the next three updates we'll be taking a look at one of the world's greatest civilizations - the Roman Empire. We'll take a look at the humble beginnings, rise to power, and eventual downfall of this incredible empire - and all the major events along the way. Our look back into the past begins in 753 BCE - and Rome, the eventual capital of the empire, is founded on Palatine Hill by Romulus. It's still the Iron Age - and the only structures you'll find here are thatched roof huts. It may not look like much right now - but soon, the city will start to take shape. By 509 BCE, major changes are starting to take place in Rome. The last king has been expelled, which marks the beginning of the Roman Republic. Rome now has a constitution and a Republican government - and some of its first grand structures are starting to be built on Capitoline Hill, such as the Temple of Jupiter. As the Republic starts to expand - its clear that having appropriate infrastructure to keep up will be vital. Some of the first aqueducts are built around 312 BCE, providing much needed water to some of the Republic's most important cities. While the empire is growing rapidly - its also attracting the attention of outside invaders. The Carthaginian leader Hannibal and his troops wanted a piece of the Republic - but an invasion from the south (modern day Tunisia) would be too predictable and would be easily countered. Ingeniously, he led his troops (and an entire herd of elephants!) north into Iberia and across the Alps - on route to Italy in a surprise sneak attack. While Hannibal achieves his goal of making it into Italy without facing the Roman navy or land garrisons - his next big challenge will be trying to defeat a much larger Roman army at the Battle of Cannae. Despite being outnumbered, he uses brilliant military tactics to take down the Romans and secure a crucial victory, one that causes the Romans to fear him for years to come. Even to this day, Hannibal is widely regarded as one of the greatest military leaders of all time. Despite a couple defeats, the Roman Republic continues to move forward and prosper. Rome is expanding greatly - and a number of magnificent structures are beginning to be built. In 46 BCE the Forum of Caesar is built for Julius Caesar - and serves as a meeting place for the Senate. Rome's power is continuing to grow - and we'll be taking an depth look at the height of Rome in the next update. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Ancient Egypt" Thanks to @mike_oxlong, @CorinaMarie, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @RobertLM78, @Odainsaker, @Dreadnought, @bladeberkman, @Prophet42, @Toby Ferrian, @The British Sausage, @Krisman, @mrsmartman, @RandyE, @nRVOUS, @Akallan, @SC4L0ver, @kschmidt, @_Michael, @Maloskero, @Tonraq, @Marushine, @scotttbarry, @raynev1, @Manuel-ito, @Elenphor, @Edvarz, @Krasner, & @nos.17 for the likes & reactions!
  21. Ancient Egypt

    Today, we're traveling back to 2500 BCE to Ancient Egypt to take a look some of the greatest man made wonders of all time, along with some of the stunning surrounding landscape. We begin with the The Great Sphinx of Giza - the most recognizable statue of Ancient Egypt - and even to this day, it remains one of the world's most famous statues. It features a lion's body with the head of an Egyptian king - and was carved of out limestone most likely during the reign of King Khafre (2558-2532 BCE). The Nile River was truly vital to Ancient Egypt in a number of ways - not just for crops and irrigation, but for also allowing ships to sail from city to city. Small docks like this one lined the edge of the river. The land surrounding the Nile River was nutrient rich, and had excellent farming conditions. The ancient Egyptians called the soil "The Gift of the Nile" - and a variety of crops could be planted such as wheat, figs, barley, melons, and figs. We move on to the pyramids - it took three generations to complete this complex, and it was well worth the wait. Despite their condition today - the pyramids were once coated in polished white limestone - one of the most incredible sights imaginable. Each pyramid has a series of chambers underneath - and are believed to be tombs for their namesakes. The Pyramid of Khufu - also known as the Great Pyramid of Giza - was the largest of these pyramids. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to still remain to this day. The Pyramid of Khafre is the second largest of the Pyramids (although it might look taller due the fact it's on a higher elevation) - but has a much more elaborate complex of chambers and was also once connected to the Sphinx by a walkway. The Pyramid of Menkaure was the smallest of the three - to set it apart and to give it a unique look, the lower portion is encased in granite. Finally, some overviews of the entire area. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Big thanks to @tariely, @redfox85, @RandyE, @RobertLM78, @raynev1, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @CorinaMarie, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @The British Sausage, @Akallan, @Elenphor, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, & @SC4L0ver for the likes on the preview!
  22. http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=1176756723
  23. Ancient Egypt (Preview)

    Ancient Egypt (Preview) Ancient Egypt has always been a personal favorite place of mine - and I'm finally making it a reality in SC4. I recently found an awesome model online which I exported into a number of parts and assembled it in the game.. and the results are impressive. (If anyone is really interested in it, I'll try to contact the author to see if I can re upload it). From there it was a matter of custom lotting it and carefully removing the base textures - if anyone's interested, I did a guide on that process in my Year In Review entry. I'm planning on doing some more commentary and guides in the future though Anyways, I'm putting the finishing touches on this scene - its covering the Pyramids, Sphinx, Nile River, and some of the surrounding farmland.. expect to see the full update very soon! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - Landmarks" Big thanks to @Tonraq,@Odainsaker, @RobertLM78, @bladeberkman, @tariely, @CorinaMarie, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @nRVOUS, @kingofsimcity, @mike_oxlong, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @matias93, @jakis, @Fantozzi, @Pluispixel, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @Akallan, @redfox85, @bobolee, @Angry Mozart, @sucram17, @SC4L0ver. @Krasner, @kelistmac, @europe.au, @geminijen, @Simmer2, @gigius76, & @raynev1 for all the likes!
  24. Creating realistic rural settings

    Replies: _Michael: Thanks! I spend a lot of my time expanding the city based on density transitions: high to medium, medium to low, low to medium, etc. kschmidt: Diagonals zones coming off FA roads was done to a limited extent by someone else- they however zones diagonal houses on an FA road but I took a perpendicular approach. FrankU's Dutch Parks are highly versatile and can provide posh fencing, low density tree fillers and cool looking paths. The horse race is a bit small and the diagonal downtown section has a little too much repetition but... It passes muster! I do love slotting in railyards into my industry. kelistmac: Cheers! I always go for large and gridbusting where possible- it's even possible to gridbust using strictly orthogonal streets and roads. Simmer2: Thank you! Your LOTs and BATs go some way to filling in my railways, industrial zones and rural areas. Entry 6- Creating Realistic Rural Settings Building urban areas is one speciality of mine and I do love industrial areas, but where I flourish in is with rural areas. Using MMPs I can create an organic look to a grid system of fields, or do some immense grid-busting. Listen up as I reveal some methods for creating highly realistic rural areas. 1. The 101 of Realistic Rural Scenes is rural/urban transitions and vice versa. 2. You will need fences bordering the fields, woodland filler tiles (or MMP trees), low density areas and of course the grunge roads found in Bipin's Industrial Essentials help too! 3. The city border can be all sorts: housing, light industry, a school, a large facility, a utility complex, etc. What matters though is there being a clear division between where the urban ends and the rural begins. 4. One method is mixing in fields with RCI zones. So when you move to the city outskirts there are fields either penetrating into the city area or there are fields surrounded by city blocks, etc. 5. The other crucial thing to consider is SPACE. 6. The smallest field needs to be at a minimum approximately 200 metres wide. Like the field above its width is 12 tiles across- or 192m. 7. In the North of Pololomia I mixed in fields with industrial blocks. This can make building to the grid very interesting and thus rather Americanized. Remember: SPACE, fillers and clear rural/urban divisions. 8. It's perfectly normal to have an industrial estate or business park to suddenly emerge from the countryside and farmland. But these kind of areas often have a lot of green space, trees and again SPACE. 9. Rural/urban transitions come in all shapes and sizes. For instance the railway marks the separation between an outer city suburb and the countryside. 10. In the future I will show the full area and you will appreciate the layout, size and detail involved. In these teaser pics though and in this one we have a bit of MMP gridbusting. Gravel/tarmac MMPs can go in any direction, as can walls and flora- EXPLOIT THIS to the max! 11. The next big challenge of rural/countryside scenes are the fields themselves. DO NOT use plopped field/crop lots. These have little to no variation and so make the grid stand out like a sore thumb. Because of the fields variation/(organic irregularity) your eyes are drawn to the fields, thus rendering the orthogonal roads less obvious and intrusive. 12. But MMP fields -- and I have taken great inspiration and artistic license from Ln X here -- make fields realistic. Why? Fields are organic and plants are sprouting in a chaotic fashion. Laying down MMPs emulates this chaotic distribution and so the entire field becomes this large painting- subtle variation of one theme. 13. I will explain more about MMPing fields in a future entry- but the basic process is usually mixing two flora MMPs together to create a thick, detailed look. 14. MMPs can also extend lots which seem very confined. The industrial buildings in the centre have more presence because of the dirt truck stop. This is just one small example of how texture MMPs and vehicle MMPs can produce incredibly realistic scenes with only three or four MMPs being used. 15. Using Ilive's Reader and the Lot Editor, 1x1 residential buildings can be changed into parks with no base texture. 16. I'm only just beginning to explore this technique but the results produce astonishing off-the-grid images. The buildings are surrounded by MMPs which create the illusion of a large lot, but the reality is this- these are 1x1 park tiles which have a house in the centre and a transparent texture. For the longest time I have always wanted to do something like the above and finally my dreams are coming true! Well... That wraps up this entry. And next week another entry. Stay tuned.
  25. London - Landmarks

    For the final chapter of London, we're taking a look at some more of the city's most iconic landmarks. We begin with a look back in time to the 1200s - to the Old London Bridge. Constructed in 1209 - this bridge stood for over 600 years as the main route across the River Thames. While long gone, various drawings from the era depict a bustling bridge surrounded by medieval houses on both sides. Unfortunately, the design of the bridge led to its ultimate demise, as it impeded river traffic - and was eventually demolished in the 1800s to make way for a more modern bridge. The next stop is one of London's most awe-inspiring buildings - St. Paul's Cathedral. Designed by famed architect Christopher Wren and opened in 1708, it was part of a major rebuilding program after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The cathedral serves as the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London - and is one of the city's most popular attractions as well. The London Eye is one of the city's most popular attractions - located on the banks of the River Thames, it was the world's largest Ferris wheel when completed in 2000. If you can get past the long lines, the views of the city's South Bank from the top are incredible. We continue on with a trip to one of London's most famous bridges - Tower Bridge. Not to be confused with the original London Bridge (as seen in the first picture, since replaced with more modern versions) - this Victorian Gothic landmark has been one of the city's most distinctive sights since its completion in 1894. Close by Tower Bridge is another one of the city's famous landmarks - the Tower of London. This historic structure was built back in the 1190s and has served as a fortress, palace, and prison. Our next stop is one of the city's most famous squares - Trafalgar Square. Its named after the famed Battle of Trafalgar - a key British naval victory in 1805 - and it's been a popular gathering place for people (and pigeons) since 1840. The iconic Nelson's Column in the middle of the square is one of the city's most famous monuments. Our last stop is one of the world's most iconic buildings - Big Ben. This famous clock tower is located on the north end of the Palace of Westminster and has chimed since 1859. Recent maintenance repairs though means you'll have to wait until 2021 to hear it regularly again. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - The City & The Shard" Big thanks to @matias93, @RobertLM78, @The British Sausage, @Angry Mozart, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @bobolee, @nos.17, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @APSMS, @mike_oxlong, @mattb325, @SC4L0ver, @Mr Saturn64, @Dreadnought, @tonyr, @jakis, @Neto Dari, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Tonraq, @Elenphor, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
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