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nedal2001

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  1. Hope - A Natural Growth Story

    The story of Hope had spread throughout the region, and what had started out as a settlement of outcasts was now attracting not only those with no where to go, but also well-to-do families that valued the freedom Hope afforded them. On the corner of Walter and Maple Streets, relatively nice homes were constructed by some of the wealthier families that had moved into the town. These families contributed significantly to the economy of Hope, helping to further the development of the farms around the town – one family in particular, the Terring family, acquired a large number of cattle that they had graze behind their home, and the selling of the milk and meat became their primary business. The Hope Council was formed to run the affairs of the town, and would convene every Friday at the Lord’s House Church on Walter Street. The church was the meeting spot of the town, and the Friday meetings were attended by all. With the population of the town growing beyond 200 people, it had become important for the residents to have some kind of leadership to help guide the growth and prosperity of Hope. While the cattle were owned by Terring, the farms were all the property of the town, and the income provided from the crops were distributed equally amongst all the families. Of course, that did not mean some of the families did not start operating side businesses – the Brook family, for example, now had a couple of trailers in their logistics company to help transport goods not only to and from Hope, but also other settlements in the area. The Glass family began working as the primary contractors in Hope, building everything from walls to houses, while the Hodom family opened up a design and décor office and helped fabricate furniture for the town’s residents. The Hope Council was eager to see the development of the town, and the first project they unanimously voted for was the upgrading of Walter Street – they wanted to turn the muddy dirt road into a cobblestone street that connected all the way to the primary road on the outskirts of town. They had enough EDs saved up to make the project happen relatively quickly, and once they were down with Walter Street, the paving of Maple Street would begin.
  2. Hope - Year 3

    The story of Hope had spread throughout the region, and what had started out as a settlement of outcasts was now attracting not only those with no where to go, but also well-to-do families that valued the freedom Hope afforded them. On the corner of Walter and Maple Streets, relatively nice homes were constructed by some of the wealthier families that had moved into the town. These families contributed significantly to the economy of Hope, helping to further the development of the farms around the town – one family in particular, the Terring family, acquired a large number of cattle that they had graze behind their home, and the selling of the milk and meat became their primary business. The Hope Council was formed to run the affairs of the town, and would convene every Friday at the Lord’s House Church on Walter Street. The church was the meeting spot of the town, and the Friday meetings were attended by all. With the population of the town growing beyond 200 people, it had become important for the residents to have some kind of leadership to help guide the growth and prosperity of Hope. While the cattle were owned by Terring, the farms were all the property of the town, and the income provided from the crops were distributed equally amongst all the families. Of course, that did not mean some of the families did not start operating side businesses – the Brook family, for example, now had a couple of trailers in their logistics company to help transport goods not only to and from Hope, but also other settlements in the area. The Glass family began working as the primary contractors in Hope, building everything from walls to houses, while the Hodom family opened up a design and décor office and helped fabricate furniture for the town’s residents. The Hope Council was eager to see the development of the town, and the first project they unanimously voted for was the upgrading of Walter Street – they wanted to turn the muddy dirt road into a cobblestone street that connected all the way to the primary road on the outskirts of town. They had enough EDs saved up to make the project happen relatively quickly, and once they were down with Walter Street, the paving of Maple Street would begin.
  3. Part 1 - The Beginning

    In the mid-21st century, climate change led to global catastrophes that nearly ended humankind as we know it. Massive tsunamis and flooding coupled with extreme natural disasters changed the Earth that lasted years, leading to loss of life in the billions. Towards the late 21st century, the extreme weather and disasters began to subside, leaving a handful of people to lead humanity back to relevance. Much was lost – technology, recorded history, and almost everything that had been accomplished by the human race was gone and had to be rediscovered. Our story begins with a group of survivors a few dozen years after the Great Storm in what would be modern-day Ghana, West Africa. Earth’s temperature was permanently disrupted, and the environment in Ghana was now similar to the Mediterranean and Central Europe. Rediscovery of human advancement and technology was relatively rapid, and government, although limited to small areas, was recognized – unfortunately, most governments were oppressive in their ways. The world now operated under one currency, the Earth Dollar, which the New United Nations was responsible for printing and distributing. This specific group of survivors were outcasts from neighboring cities that were escaping prosecution and valued freedom. Seeking shelter from the rain, the small group of settlers built shacks, and to feed themselves, they planted a wheat field and hunted the local wildlife. What started out as a few families doubled in size in a very short timespan as word got out of the new settlement. The extra hands meant that the settlers could plant a corn field, as well, leading to excess food crop which they took to the closest city and sold for Earth Dollars (EDs). The population of the new settlement, called Hope, now had a population 34, with corn and wheat fields that are the town’s only tradeable goods. The pictures below show the beginnings of this new settlement. Welcome to the story of Hope!
  4. In the mid-21st century, climate change led to global catastrophes that nearly ended humankind as we know it. Massive tsunamis and flooding coupled with extreme natural disasters changed the Earth that lasted years, leading to loss of life in the billions. Towards the late 21st century, the extreme weather and disasters began to subside, leaving a handful of people to lead humanity back to relevance. Much was lost – technology, recorded history, and almost everything that had been accomplished by the human race was gone and had to be rediscovered. Our story begins with a group of survivors a few dozen years after the Great Storm in what would be modern-day Ghana, West Africa. Earth’s temperature was permanently disrupted, and the environment in Ghana was now similar to the Mediterranean and Central Europe. Rediscovery of human advancement and technology was relatively rapid, and government, although limited to small areas, was recognized – unfortunately, most governments were oppressive in their ways. The world now operated under one currency, the Earth Dollar, which the New United Nations was responsible for printing and distributing. This specific group of survivors were outcasts from neighboring cities that were escaping prosecution and valued freedom. Seeking shelter from the rain, the small group of settlers built shacks, and to feed themselves, they planted a wheat field and hunted the local wildlife. What started out as a few families doubled in size in a very short timespan as word got out of the new settlement. The extra hands meant that the settlers could plant a corn field, as well, leading to excess food crop which they took to the closest city and sold for Earth Dollars (EDs). The population of the new settlement, called Hope, now had a population 34, with corn and wheat fields that are the town’s only tradeable goods. The pictures below show the beginnings of this new settlement. Welcome to the story of Hope!
  5. Project: Lake Victoria

    I live in Africa, and that looks exactly like Africa! Especially the western coast (Senegal, Gambia, southern Mauritania)
  6. Show us what you're working on!

    It has been a loooong time since I've posted on Simtropolis, but I've gotten into Cities Skylines recently. The story here is that in the near future, catastrophic natural disasters hit the Earth, nearly causing the extinction of humanity, the picture below is a group of survivors starting their own settlement after escaping the oppressive "governments" that currently rule a small but growing human population.
  7. Teaser Shot

    There has not been much progress when it comes to this story because of Cities Skylines, but I was thinking about it the other day, and I decided Desten is going to have two storylines from two cities in it - Sophara (SimCity 4) and Springfield (Cities Skylines)! Somehow, I will intertwine the two (Springfield will be found sometime in the early 20th Century), but for now, here is a single teaser shot!
  8. Teaser Shots

    The reason there are dirt roads is because of the historical time - in the mid-1800s, dirt roads were still prevalent in big cities. Thanks for the comment, both tariely and krover!
  9. Teaser Shots

    So in preparation for the new entry, here is a couple of shots of Desten Boulevard - in this case, north is looking west. Notice the newly constructed Saint Francis Cathedral a few blocks north of the edge of downtown Sophara.
  10. Desten - 1850

    Ive been looking for them - I thought I had them saved somewhere but I cant seem to find them
  11. Desten - 1850

    Head of Council: Franklin Brickson (Just Elected) Population: 119,114 Playing Catchup We come back to our story in 1850 – a full twenty-five years since we last visited Sophara and Desten. Last time we were here, James Hemming had just won his third consecutive – and final – term as Head of the Executive Council in an election that was marred with controversy and violence. Each one of his three terms were known for separate, distinct reasons – the first term under Hemming was known for the aggressive development of the city as well as his focus on strengthening law enforcement and police, while the second term was associated with the creation of the Desten Tax Code, which put a 10% Income Tax on everyone and a 10% Import Tax on all imports coming into the country. His third term was perhaps his most ambitious, however, as the Executive Council began focusing on mining coal and getting it down to Sophara for use and export. Railroad tracks were built leading into the center of the country, and coal mines were opened thanks to private investments by most of the rich families in Desten. A coal refinery was constructed on the eastern side of Sophara by the Hemming family, who took the big share of the wealth from the coal mining because of the power the Head of Council, James Hemming, had consolidated. As his third term came to a close, however, his most likely successor – George Carpenter – was backed and funded by the Brickson family, the Hemming family’s bitter rivals. The Carpenter Years The 1830 elections went as expected, with George Carpenter taking the majority and becoming Desten’s second ever Head of Council. In the weeks after Carpenter was named Head, there was a lot of fear from the Hemming family and their associates, who did not know what to expect after their man had left office. Secret meetings between high level members of both the Brickson and Hemming families took place frequently, as they wanted to ensure a smooth transition where everyone’s interests remained intact. Neither family had any desire to see their system of obtaining wealth strained, so it was agreed that Carpenter would not chase after any dealings the Hemming family and its associates had in place with the Executive Council. In return, they would put their weight and support behind Carpenter’s leadership to make sure he was able to implement his vision without any drama. The agreement that was made after the 1830 elections allowed Carpenter – who was an entrepreneur by trade – to focus on what he thought was best for Desten. Coming from a business background, the new Head of Council was keen to see private businesses flourish in the capital, and embarked on making that happen. He approved several construction initiatives for the Sophada downtown area, leading to a small boom in construction and then in trade and retail activity. That was naturally followed by the opening of restaurants, cafes, and even small boutique hotels all around the Sophara downtown area, and most of centered around Desten Boulevard. He also approved an initiative to continue the expansion of Desten Boulevard’s wide avenue further south, which led to the construction of several rich townhouses and expensive apartment buildings being constructed. The 1835 elections, with the backing of the Hemming and the Brickson families, saw George Carpenter easily win his second term in the biggest landslide victory recorded in Desten history to date. No one wanted to screw up a good thing – a lot of wealth was flowing into the hands of Desten’s elite, whether it was through trade, coal mining, farming, or whatever else – and Carpenter was a Head of Council that most of those elite could get behind, simply because he did not confront them and go after their interest. Instead, his second term was an extension of his first – more development in Sophara, especially in the downtown district. He easily won his third term in 1840, as well, leading Desten from 1830 until 1845 in what was perhaps the country’s most peaceful time since its creation. It also saw the opening of Sophara’s first factories, aided by the fact that coal was readily available. To no one’s surprise, the two factories were owned by the Brickson and Hemming family, respectively. Waters’ Single Term and Downtown Desten’s third Head of Council was a man called Stanson Waters, another neutral candidate that most of the elite put their weight behind. Unlike Carpenter, however, Waters was more of “a man of the people” and promised to keep anyone who stepped out of line in check. He almost immediately clashed heads with Sophara’s elite, even sending a few low level men to prison on fraud charges. This, obviously did not bode well with Desten’s wealthy, and the next few years were spent attempting to undermine all of Waters’ efforts. This led to a very inefficient time in office for Waters, and there was generally a stagnation in the development of Desten as a whole over that time period, something that Desten’s rich were eager to point at seemingly every day. James Hemming, who died in 1834, was associated with strengthening law enforcement and introducing the 10% Tax Code, and George Carpenter’s 15 years were known as a time of flourishing business, development, and peace in Desten. Stanson Waters’ time, however, was known as a time of stagnation and tension, which would make his re-election campaign in 1850 very difficult as he had no real financial backers while his opponent, Franklin Brickson, had a united Desten elite behind him. What did come out the Waters’ tenure as Head as further redevelopment of the downtown area, as a fancy new hotel called the Quatre Saisons (Four Seasons) would open its doors for business, becoming the largest single building in all of Desten. That construction project was also paralleled by a new administrative building for the Executive Council, built across the street from the new hotel.
  12. One More Picture

    One more picture before the real update!
  13. Teaser

    I know its been a while, but I am back to working on Desten - here is a teaser for the next update!
  14. Desten - 1825

    I definitely get what you're saying about the street textures - unfortunately, I have no idea how to play with Lot Editor! You are right about the small touches - they will start appearing soon. I have been following the growth of Manhattan through the 1800s, and Sophara is at that point where it grew very quickly in the past 20-30 years. Industry, religious buildings, etc...all of that will start showing their faces soon! Thank you!
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