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What are you reading?

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Originally posted by: BlondeTwiggy

I'm reading a collection of short stories by Edgar Allen Poe.  The last one I read was "Thou Art the Man."  Macabre and grotesque, to be sure, but makes for great reading.  The only one I couldn't quite stand was "The Black Cat," when he gouged the cat's eye out.  I almost cried.  8.gifquote>

The Black Cat is my favorite short story by Poe, besides another one whose name I can't remember. It had the work "masque" in the title. It's about a disease forcing people into a castle, where they decide it was fitting to have a party until some mysterious man appears. It was just awesome. I read it back in 7th grade.

Right now I'm about half way through Slash's autobiography. It's very interesting. I also want to find The Shawshank Redemption, seeing as it is my favorite movie.

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Currently reading Antony and Cleopatra by Coleen McCullough.  Interesting addition to her Roman series, of which I have read all previous volumes.

The events in this series seem to be pretty much according to the various histories, but watch out for the appendices on the Latin vernacular.  Sometimes wrong entries are corrected later.  Some interesting pejorative terms, not usually found in Caesar nor Cicero.

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Originally posted by: N_O_Body   Sometimes wrong entries are corrected later.  quote>
 

I have read some of Josephus and Tacitus, and even these were full of not just exaggeration, but the bias that makes ancient histories a torture to wring the truth out of. It makes one think that an accurate description of any detail from that era is mighty hard to come by.

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The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant by Stephen R Donaldson.  I enjoyed it a lot more the first time I read it when I was an angsty teen and more inclined to identify with the tortured protagonist.  This time around it just makes me feel weary.

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Originally posted by: haljackey I'm reading "The Top 10 of everything 2009" another one of those Ripley's/Guiness book of record books.quote>
 

I have the 2008 edition, I wonder how much more has actually changed. 3.gif

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I'm reading "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe", the sequel to "The Hitchhicker's Guide to the Galaxy", translated into Greek. Next I wanna read the twilight series and after that i wanna get my hands on Nineteen Eighty-Four 9.gif9.gif lol

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I'm currently reading The Third World War: The Untold Story by Sir John Hackett.  It is a very good, if not technical, read about the Cold War going hot in August 1985.

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Eastwinn: Was it Masque of the Red Death? That's the only Poe story I know with "masque" in the title.

psander5: Fahrenheit 451 is good, was one of my favorite books. I read it a while ago though and didn't enjoy it as much...not sure why... maybe because I knew how it ended. 3.gif

I'm reading through some stories by Arthur C. Clarke, most recently: "The Lion of Comarre"

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I did start on Michael Mallett's The Borgias as promised, but it was so impossibly boring and complex, I gave it up partway. It might be good if you're interested in the nuances of Catholic Church politics and administration during the Renaissance, but it's literary anesthesia for any other purpose.

I badly needed lighter reading after that mental dust storm, so I'm rereading Clive Cusslers's Black Wind until I decide what to read next.

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Swiss Family Robinson. It's part of a two-book set that also has Robinson Crusoe (which BlondeTwiggy is/was reading). I've read it before, but not for years. I recently finished Jules Verne's Mysterious Island.

I don't read as much fiction as I'd like, but I hope to change that.

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Originally posted by: your_adress_here Political Ideoligies and the Democratic Ideal

It's my text for my political ideologies class but it makes for a very good read.quote>

18.gif

Actually, Dreams From my Father isn't about politics at all. It's an autobiography. And it's from 1995, so it predates his career as a politician. The Audacity of Hope is his recent book which is about politics. Which we're not assigned to read and I don't plan on reading, either.

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Heh heh...it was a personal goal of mine this year (a resolution, if you will) to start reading more.  It really, really helped that the Waldenbooks in the mall closed down, which meant that everything in the store was at least 40% off.  I got a ton of good books, including (but not limited to):

Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury (which I also have never read but always heard great things about; it was something like $4.00)

Anthem, by Ayn Rand (a favorite of mine, in the vein of Lois Lowry's The Giver)

Our Dumb World, by The Onion (a satirical atlas, can you imagine???  At $11.00, it's the most expensive book I've bought so far this year.  This'll be my bathroom material for a while 2.gif...)

The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams (all five HGttG novels so far in one book: $10.00)

The Audacity of Hope, by Barack Obama (heh heh...I do plan on reading this 2.gif ; truth be told I should've done so long ago, but hey, better late than never....)

I've also ordered Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? from Barnes and Noble, because no bookstore in town seems to carry it (which I find slightly strange, as its the book that the movie Blade Runner is based on).

Now...where the heck do I start 47.gif!?

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River Walk: The Epic Story of San Antonio's River by Lewis F. Fisher.

Okay, "epic" may be too delusionally grandiose as this is hardly the Nibelungenlied, but it still is a fascinating social and urban history of how a tiny spring-fed stream on the frontiers of civilization was turned into glittering tourist attraction studied by urban designers and envious city planners around the world. Not so much a technical manual, but a woven history of politics and culture, spanning across local Mexican culture and WPA bureaucracy to visionary local entrepreneurs and ambitious politicoes, whose tangled tapestry creates a city.

I never knew some of the hot mineral springs feeding the river and its spas were home to mussels that produced freshwater pearls. Apparently, a "Pearl Rush" of prospectors wiped out the mussels in the early 1900s.

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