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What are you reading?

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Nothing just at the sec but...

Waiting for the last Harry Potter book - roll on July.

I also like:

Artemis Fowl - Eion Colfier

Submarine Novels - Patrick Robinson, Tom Clancy

LOTR - Tolkien

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austin (very funny story)

As you can see a fairly eclectic taste.

Did I mention Harry Potter ....

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Originally posted by: N_O_Body
Originally posted by: Easy Bakes
Originally posted by: N_O_Body The Children of Húrin by J.R.R. Tolkien.  An story of the First Age of Middle Earth.quote>
 

Is it good?

quote>

Depends on whether you liked LOTR and The Hobbit.  If you liked the Silmariion, you will probably like this, because it takes place in the first age.  LOTR is at the end of the third age of Middle Earth.  Will say more when I have read it.quote>

 

Liked  LOTR and The Hobbit, the Silmariion was cumbersome reading, kinda like reading the bible lots of slow places.

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I'm in the middle of Pontius Pilate, by Paul L Maier. It's semi-fictionalized history, taking the known facts and filling them in with some color. His Biblical encounter with Jesus only takes up a couple of chapters in the middle, with the rest dealing with his relationships with Emperor Tiberius, Lucius Aelius Sejanus, and later, Caligula. The descriptions of Roman life and customs are engrossing.

I keep meaning to start on Michael Mallett's The Borgias, it's on my list next.

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As I've gotten older, I've largely stopped reading books as a form of personal entertainment. Nowadays a lot of the reading I do is digital - reading stuff on the internet like people's posts on forums, wikipedia articles, blogs, etc. The reading I do that's actual print material is pretty much either the newspaper or a textbook/reference book I'm looking something up in or studying from.

Fiction books really don't interest me any more. Though, I did read an interesting book this past fall about the development of and ethics in modern engineering.

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Though, I did read an interesting book this past fall about the development of and ethics in modern engineering.quote>

What's the name of the book?

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I've got about three books on the go right now.

On the Road - Jack Kerouac

A Walk in the Woods - Bill Bryson

Right Ho, Jeeves - P. G. Wodehouse

For Christmas I'm getting these books, which I will also add to my current reading list.

Dream of the Red Chamber Vol 1 & 2 - Cao Xueqin

Hiroshige: Master of Japanese Ukiyo-e Woodblock Prints - Adele Schombs

among others.

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Manticorefan... That book sounds interesting.  Might check it out myself.  I've recently become interested in Roman culture around that time period. 

I'm reading a collection of short stories by Edgar Allen Poe.  The last one I read was "Thou Art the Man."  Macabre and grotesque, to be sure, but makes for great reading.  The only one I couldn't quite stand was "The Black Cat," when he gouged the cat's eye out.  I almost cried.  8.gif

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I'm a huge fan of the Jeeves and Wooster TV series. My parents got the complete set for DVD this Christmas. It's really fantastic. So far I've read two of the novels by Wodehouse. And they are utterly fantastic. When I read it, the voices of Fry and Laurie, and the other actors, fit very well with the words spoken by the characters. You should definitely get the books.

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I must say that I tried to read a CJ Cherryh book once. Rusalka was it's name. It was the first book in my life that I was never able to finish. I hope her other books are better than that one!quote>

Same here. Except it was a different CJ Cherryh book - the name escapes me at the moment - which probably only reinforces just how boring it was.

Currently reading "Jingo" by Terry Pratchett.

I may pick up "Nations" sooner or later. Maybe also my own copy of "Good Omens" - which was co-written with Neil Gaiman. Brilliant book, that.

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Originally posted by: Shadow_Assassin

I must say that I tried to read a CJ Cherryh book once. Rusalka was it's name. It was the first book in my life that I was never able to finish. I hope her other books are better than that one!quote>

Same here. Except it was a different CJ Cherryh book - the name escapes me at the moment - which probably only reinforces just how boring it was.

Currently reading "Jingo" by Terry Pratchett.

I may pick up "Nations" sooner or later. Maybe also my own copy of "Good Omens" - which was co-written with Neil Gaiman. Brilliant book, that.quote>

 

I just bought Down Below Station today in my quest to read all the Hugo Award winners.

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I am reading:

Hepworth, George. The Whip, the How, and the Sword. (1864)

It is a primary source account of life in Louisiana during the late years of the US Civil War.

Wallerstein, Immanuel. The Capitalist World Economy. (?)

A dense explanation of the rise and workings of capitalism on a global scale.

Jacobs, Jane. The Life and Death of Great American Cities. (1960's)

Jane Jacob's seminal critique of traditional urban planning in the US.

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I just finished Fukuzawa Yukichi's Autobiography last week. He probably embodied everything that happened in the Meiji Restoration more than anyone else, despite keeping his life apolitical. He really looked down on Confucian learning, and pretty much waged academic warfare to have it banished to the history books where it belongs.

Earlier this year I read "A Farewell to Arms" and "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Hemingway. His books are written in such an engaging style that they are difficult to put down. I hated reading it in high school, but I now completely understand why we are supposed to read such books. Perhaps I should give Dickens another chance...

Next up is some more academic reading about Meiji and WWII Japan by Caroline Gluck and John Dower respectively. In between I'll be looking at some more James Clavell, wrapping up his Asian Saga with "Noble House."

I rather enjoy reading about Japanese history, it is so different from the West, and yet still so similar. As time goes by I'll pick up more books about American history, and my eventual goal is to read the Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon.

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Originally posted by: hym

What's the name of the book?quote>

The Engineering Project: It’s Nature, Ethics, and Promise by Gene Moriarty.

Anyways, now I'm actually in the middle of reading a book I got for Christmas: How the States Got Their Shapes by Mark Stein. Quite interesting.

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Just finished Paranoid Park by Blake Nelson and Pilate's Wife by Antoinette May.  They were mildly entertaining. 

Today read short stories "Yesterday was Monday" by Theodore Sturgeon and "Time Locker" by Henry Kuttner.  Both were excellent. 

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I just finished The Lost World by Michael Crichton which is way better then the movie. I also just finished Huckelberry Finn for school

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I am currntly reading Concepts of Space: the History of Theories of Space in Physics by Max Jammer (Third, Enlarged Edition). It was written in 1953 and has a foeward by Albert Einstein. The book begins with how the ancients considered space, with much of the discussion centering on Aristotle's theories. Plato's Republic is referred to several times.

Of course, I've only read the introduction, foreward, and chapter 1 so far. I'm reading it during spare moments (bus rides, waiting, ect.).

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