Jump to content

Bristol

Sign in to follow this  
  • Entries
    13
  • Comments
    82
  • Views
    4,616

About this City Journal

Bristol is a city, unitary authority area and county in South West England, southwest of London and east of Cardiff. With a city population of 1,006,600 and an urban area population of over...

Entries in this City Journal

Mike the Mayor

Cotham

COTHAM.jpg

Cotham is a relatively wealthy suburb neighbouring the most high-class in the city - Clifton. House prices here are rocketing with listed features, large indoor and outdoor space, education and health levels, and location all on the neighbourhood's side. The area really flourished during the very late 1700s and early 1800s and miraculously survived the wars completely.

The neighbourhood borders the Downs parklands to the south and west, Clifton to the sort of southeast and the Latin Quarter to the east.

Sunday 29th August: Max (24C) ; Min (13C)

01.jpg

02.jpg

04.jpg

03.jpg

05.jpg

07.jpg

09.jpg

08.jpg

06.jpg

Mike the Mayor

Temple Quay

TEMPLEQUAY.jpg

 

Temple Quay is a modern office development to the east of the City Centre. Mirroring that of Canary Wharf, London and La Defense, Paris - it forms a very significant part of the city's skylines with dominant skyscrapers, the first of which was constructed back in 1986. The development now comprises high-end companies such as those listed above and many more! It is the home to many banking, financial and commerical services as well as Trans-National Corporations. This really puts Bristol on the map!

Oh yeah, you may wonder why it is called 'Quay' ? Well a stretch of water similar to St. Augustine's Reach in the City Centre branches off the main river through the city and during the industrial era when the city hosted an inland harbour, this stretch of water was important for importing vehicle parts and engines for St. Phillips Station. The train station is now completely different to its former appearance with a modern, shiny glass roof with buttress-like supports. The station's lines travel eastwards towards London and Paris.

Monday 23rd August: Max (25C) ; Min (15C)

So Temple Quay:

08.jpg

09.jpg

05.jpg

02.jpg

06.jpg

07.jpg

01.jpg

04.jpg

03.jpg

Mike the Mayor

Bower Ashton

BOWERASHTON.jpg
Bower Ashton is a lower-to-middle class area of Bristol, in the southwest of the city on the south banks of the River Avon. The area spread out during the 1920s when the area was very industrial, and as such terraced houses interrupted by tower blocks is the order of the district. Bower Ashton has developed a high street with centralised activity including cafes and service shops which serve the area. The area used to be a rather dingy and sometimes dangerous place but a lot of work has been done to restore building frontages and greening up the area since 1960. Bower Ashton will always be that sort of area in town but it's a lot better than it used to be.

Sunday 22nd August: Max (27C) ; Min (16C)

05.jpg

Overview of Leigh Wood Road

03.jpg

The High Street

04.jpg

The High Street

08.jpg

Bower Ashton Marketplace

02.jpg

The Ashton Gate Estate

07.jpg

The Ashton Gate Estate

01.jpg

06.jpg

Mike the Mayor

Due to the fact I have been constructing rather than picture taking these last few days, I bring a small update with a focus on elevated transport routes in the city. The ring roads are the main source of elevated movement around the city as well as the light rail service. Here are a few piccies (the next update will be bigger).

04.jpg

The Inner Ring Road

03.jpg

The beginnings of the M32 Motorway north out of Bristol as it passes through St. Werburghs

02.jpg

Temple Bridge and Junction at Old Market

01.jpg

Gloucester Avenue coming into the City Centre

Mike the Mayor

Old Market

WEATHERCHART.jpg

 

Tuesday 17th August: Max (36C) / Min (24C)

Things have really hotted up in Bristol as the mercury soared to a whapping 36.2C here in Bristol and the mercury fell no lower than 24C overnight, making for a stifling night of sleep in the city. The blistering sunshine made for a rather lethargic day across the city with fans blowing and windows shut to keep the heat OUT! The main activity in the city today was that of traffic at either end of the day. We take a look at the Old Market district of the city which centralises itself around Old Market Street, a long and often busy avenue between Bristol Temple Meads and the Inner City Ring Road. The area is characterised by expensive-looking but very reasonable 18th and 19th Century buildings with offices to let, retail and residential all bunched into one. The district earns its name, appropriately, from the old market that used to exist during the Tudor era at the now-existent bottom of the bridge (shown in the bottom picture), now a busy junction with the one remaining Tudor building - Ye Olde Market Inn.

Keep cool guys!

04.jpg

06.jpg

05.jpg

07.jpg

02.jpg

01.jpg

08.jpg

Mike the Mayor

Heatwave!

HEATWAVE.jpg

 

Monday 16th August: Max (33C) / Min (19C)

 
Here we are in the second half of August and most of Great Britain is on heatwave alert! This extract was picked from the BBC News Website warning of the high temperatures. As such, we take a look at Bristol today on a hot and sultry afternoon where the temperature soared to 33.4C at the Bristol Weather Centre. We concentrate on the parks which offer welcome relief and shade from the high temperatures.

02.jpg

01.jpg

03.jpg

04.jpg

06.jpg

05.jpg

Mike the Mayor

The City Centre

THECITYCENTRE.jpg

 

This is a comparatively large update to many as we now have a look at the centre of the city. In most cities, the City Centre is commonly one of the older parts of the city having been the heart of the city for many years. In contrast however, Bristol's City Centre is neither old or new. The real core of the city around Temple Avenue underwent a massive Manhattanisation after World War Two with much more recent but stylish blocks going up now occupied by commerical and office suites. The road network was also modified with something resembling a grid system put in place around survivng older buildings.

Amongst the horns and the yells of angry drivers and buzz of every day life, it's an interesting walk around this area seeing just how the original city now mingles with the more recent arrivals. Temple Avenue acts as a linking boulevard between Castle Park and Bristol Temple Meads train station. See what you make of it.

10.jpg

Castle Park and facing facades

07.jpg

East Castle Street and the Bristol Law Courts

09.jpg

The busy junction between Castle Park (right) and Temple Avenue (left)

03.jpg

Higher-rise buildings along Temple Avenue

06.jpg

Sidestreets to the east off Temple Avenue

02.jpg

The typical concrete jungle look of Broadmead

01.jpg

Old and new in Broadmead (note the early onset of autumn colours - in August!)

11.jpg

The Bristol Regal has been functioning as a theatre since 1950 and celebrates its 60th Anniversary this September

14.jpg

Leadshot Avenue

12.jpg

Cabot Street

13.jpg

City Wall Road

05.jpg

The Cabot Concert Hall survived World War Two unscathed

04.jpg

Leadshot Square, recently re-landscaped

Thanks for watching! From next Monday onwards, Bristol goes live in this CJ with current affairs and day to day life being shown rather than the current tours getting to know the city.
Mike the Mayor

Filler

I haven't had time to fully continue with city building but I leave you with a few pictures of Lewins Meads, possibly the most French-influenced area of the city with traditional French cafes and restaurants and pleasant sidestreets.

01.jpg

02.jpg

03.jpg

04.jpg

Check back for the next update coming soon! 1.gif

Mike the Mayor

THEWESTEND.jpg

 

So in the last update we saw the disputed territory in the West End, but this time we dive into the real West End. We have narrower, more crowded and busy streets, traffic issues, elegance and style in this corner of the city. This has been a recurring theme since the days of Bristol's Harbour when the wealthy setup residence here. Understandably, being the University area of the city, accomodation is pricey and halls of residence are in inner suburbs elsewhere quite commonly. But anyway, enough waffle, the rest of the West End:

07.jpg

                                                                              An overview of part of the West End

13.jpg

                                                                    The Council House at the bottom of Park Street

03.jpg

Busy sidestreets

04.jpg

Hotwells Road, a busy commuter route into the city

09.jpg

Park Road, an expensive postcode

12.jpg

Arnos Road and Arnos Vale Church

15.jpg

Park Streets and the top of Wills Memorial Tower (Bristol University)

16.jpg

Park Street from a different angle

18.jpg

The Clifton Triangle
 
 
Mike the Mayor

THEWESTEND.jpg
The West End is named so, appropriately, due to its position just to the west of the central area of the city. The area contains a number of important buildings such as those of Bristol University, the Council House as well as famous streets such as Park Street linking the centre to Clifton Triangle and Hotwells Road which can become a notoriously busy drive in and out of the city during commuting hours. The area continues the theme of diverse architecture as the area developed as an upmarket living area for wealthy merchants and tradesmen, close to the original city harbour. Bristol Cathedral marks the boundary between the City Centre and the West End.

Nowadays, the area continues this function with a common setup of shops/restaurants/cafes on the ground floor with houses or apartments above. There are good bus links to the City Centre as well as a linking light railway and metro system. We first take a look at a disputed area of the city. Due to the presence of many important buildings, there is a debate over whether to alter city district boundaries to count these buildings as within the City Centre. See what you make of it.

01.jpg

Canon's Marsh with Bristol Cathedral

 

06.jpg

Looking west with Bristol Cathedral and the corner of the Council House to the right

17.jpg

The City Hall, formerly the Bristol Odeon Theatre

14.jpg

Park Street facades and the Council House

10.jpg

Bristol Council House and neighbouring sidestreets

05.jpg

St. Augustine's Parade & Monument (debated whether to be postcoded as the West End or City Centre) with the City Hall and Colston House on the corner

02.jpg

Trenchard House, now a multicommercial department store

08.jpg

The Colston Buildings, Trenchard Street

11.jpg

The nearest part of the West End to the City Centre with Trenchard House (left), St. Mary on the Quay (above centre), Bristol Hippodrome (below centre) and l'Hotel du Vin - now Bristol Library (right)

 

Hope you enjoyed the first part of the tour. Next we will take a look at the true West End with it's narrower and more crowded atmosphere.

 

Mike the Mayor

THEOLDCITY.jpg

OLDCITYLOCATION.jpg

 

The Old City, the area concerned in the above picture, gets its name due to being the oldest part of the city that was once within the old city walls. There are no longer any remains of the city walls. Originally, the city was surrounded on three sides by water, the River Avon to the east and south and by St. Augustine's Reach (the waterway on the left that used to continue and finish up by St. Nicholas Markets - the circular building). The city walls were heavily damaged in the Second World War but amazing very little of the city itself was! Join me as I take you for a wander around the Old City.
 
01.jpg

07.jpg

13.jpg

05.jpg

12.jpg

10.jpg

16.jpg

15.jpg

08.jpg

14.jpg

To Be Continued....

Mike the Mayor

Introduction

BANNER.jpg

This City Journal is a fictional one but based on my home city, Bristol, in the United Kingdom. I have done a few in the past but have lost them all due to computer crashes but I now have a much better computer and it is very easy to backup so no losses! By comparison it is totally different but I have sculpted the region like that of the Bristol & Avonmouth region in real life. Street names and places will have the same names and so will surrounding towns and villages but ultimately, it is quite different by eye. Hope you enjoy!

Bristol is a city and county in itself, situated 8 miles inland from the Severn Estuary in Southwest England. With a city population of 1,006,600 and an urban population of over 3 million, it is the 3rd largest city in England after London and Birmingham.

HISTORY.jpg

It received a Royal Charter in 1155 and was granted County status in 1373. Bristol grew extensively during the 1400s but a lot of the original city centre burned down in 1604 commune. Due to the predominant timber-framing of buildings, an extensive bonfire resulted! As such, money was invested into constructing solid buildings of grandeur and style from the mid 1620s onwards, Bristol having served as a searing pit for long enough. Construction boomed after this date. Bristol fell under Spanish rule very briefly during the 1650s before returning to British rule, then the Dutch took hold. This period lasted from 1700-1756, followed by French rule from 1756-1834. The reason - trade! Bristol used to a bustling port and inland harbour. The inland harbour has since gone and the river passages have remained. The port is now situated at the town of Avonmouth, where the city's River Avon enters the Severn Estaury. Bristol then fell into British hands once more and has remained so since.

Bristol managed to avoid World War One altogether with air raids tending to be concentrated in the east of the country. World War Two however proved a much more active affair. Parts of the city centre were bombed during the November 1940 Blitz while much of the Old City survived unscathed. This is reflected in the city's architecture in particular where blitzed areas such as Temple Avenue went through a Manhattanisation in the late 1940s and 1950s. Since then, Bristol has prospered in the commercial, financial and cultural sectors. Tourism is becoming more popular and the city continues to grow and publicise worldwide.

GEOGRAPHY.jpg

Bristol is located in the southwest of England. It sits on the River Avon and is only 8 miles inland from the coastline of the Severn Estuary. The local stone is reflected in the buildingwork around the city as sandstone is particularly common. However the Mendip Mountains and other areas south of the city consist of limestone. The city has a continental climate with oceanic influences. This results in warm or hot, dry summers; cold and relatively dry winters with wetter springs and autumns as the more active jet stream brings depressions in from the sea.



CLIMATE1.jpg
Bristol Climate Graph, Copyright Bristol Meteorological Office 2000

POSTCARDS.jpg

INTRO13.jpg

INTRO4.jpg

INTRO11.jpg

INTRO12.jpg

INTRO5.jpg

INTRO7.jpg

INTRO3.jpg

INTRO6.jpg

INTRO10.jpg

INTRO8.jpg

INTRO9.jpg

INTRO1.jpg
 

Sign in to follow this  
×

Help Keep Simtropolis Online, Open & Free!

stexcollection-header.png

Would you be able to help us catch up after a bit of a shortfall?

We had a small shortfall last month. Your donation today would help us catch up for this month.

Make a Donation, Get a Gift!

We need to continue to raise enough money each month to pay for expenses which includes hardware, bandwidth, software licenses, support licenses and other necessary 3rd party costs.

By way of a "Thank You" gift, we'd like to send you our STEX Collector's DVD. It's some of the best buildings, lots, maps and mods collected for you over the years. Check out the STEX Collections for more info.

Each donation helps keep Simtropolis online, open and free!

Thank you for reading and enjoy the site!

More About STEX Collections