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Kabloosh

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  1. Can anyone help me with this?

    I picked up an abandoned city and cleared the map. I was wondering why I was seeing "no access" symbols on the map. They seemed to of disappeared after awhile though.
  2. I think it stems to traffic. I noticed things were having difficulty getting out of my city. I really wish we could have more than 1 connection out of town other than rail which in the case of trading you need a trade port which is a pain to achieve, and set up with how much room it takes up and how little room there is available. I don't know what the casino is doing for you if it is more or less the most unprofitable specialization you have. I think it is better to maybe stick to one specialization such as your processor production, or go full tourist attraction.
  3. Oh if I there was a giant reset button for our world I would be smashing it right now. The only one that exists right now requires you being president, the cooperation of many people, and hundreds of thousands of years of clean up so that reset button would hardly benefit us.
  4. Sales for Sim City 5

    They played on my want for a more modern Sim City to play. I didn't even bother looking at Sim City Societies because it lacked many core logistical challenge aspects that are in the more traditional Sim City games.
  5. Your description makes me want to smash a meteor into EA headquarters.
  6. Wrong. Great visions on ventures always start with a general approach of "guys this is an awesome idea, what do we know of what people out there might find awesome about it and how do we match that". The greatest games have always began as projects on the questions of "what do people want and what do people need". It is after that where other parts of the challenge start, for example how to package that, how to sell that, how to seperate groups from the generic volume markets so that they become a customer and a fanbase. Or rather, that is how it started out in our industry. Today it is different. For example, it is no longer "done" to approach matters to seperate groups from generic volumes, it is now required to use existing seperate groups in order to reach and utilise generic volumes. The difference may seem subtle at first, but is extremely significant and has deep consequences for customers and customer groups. EA is a prime example, because in many ways they create the trends that are shaping this industry. And yes, EA specifically collects resources to match their vision, their targets, their money. Developers, just like the computers they use, just like the customers expected to buy quietly and all resources. EA tunes all resources to maximise its strategies and gains. This is an industry. Nothing more, nothing less. It really is no surprise that EA managed to beat one of the most corrupt banks with the most desdain for its customers with its customer support ratings. It is a non factor for how such enterprises function. It is not about the customer, not about the developer, it is not about the resources. It is about maximising gain (which includes gaining control over trends in how the industry itself develops). That is the idea behind business. I'm talking about art. These two different mindsets tend to contradict themselves. When it comes to things of need, and things of use, yes the business model of wondering what it can do for others is a good mindset to have. When it comes to creating something that is more or less art(video games are works of art in my opinion) you want to follow your vision first. It doesn't hurt to take in suggestions but letting your "fanbase" run how the game turns out is far too risky and more likely than not results in too many disappointed. You simply cannot please everyone. But they do not have to clash. Take the now leaving CEO of EA. Smart guy, wrong mindset, completely caught in confusing his perspectives with those of customers. Sure, played games (also competing titles), and sure he had his own contacts for the perspective of the art(s) (so to speak), but because he forgot that selling is about selling what the customer wants and not about selling what you want or about what you need the customer to want, things bumped against a self-made wall. This is something which gets me every time we're at a conference in Europe, in Asia or back home. The publishers who run the business as an investment or venture capital project all consistantly forget that if they are to succeed they cannot afford to a) get caught in short cycle management and b) make it about them and not about the customer. As I said before, such mindsets regardless of industry or sector of society result in treating everything as a resource. Including those who do the actual work, and those who buy the work. That's never a good idea if you want to grow to rule any industry. Of course. But I believe since the main interest in the growth of the company doesn't always mean the customer is the one that is going to win out in the end. In reality they probably have thought of a thousand other awesome things but have instead have decided that they couldn't get them in on the deadline. They will prioritize because their models show the best time to release the game is at the projected date. Some companies delay but with all the hype it never seems to be as great as everyone hopes it to be. A lot of the content you want to see could likely end up in expensive DLCs. The customers have spoken and they love paying money for DLCs, and expansions.
  7. Wrong. Great visions on ventures always start with a general approach of "guys this is an awesome idea, what do we know of what people out there might find awesome about it and how do we match that". The greatest games have always began as projects on the questions of "what do people want and what do people need". It is after that where other parts of the challenge start, for example how to package that, how to sell that, how to seperate groups from the generic volume markets so that they become a customer and a fanbase. Or rather, that is how it started out in our industry. Today it is different. For example, it is no longer "done" to approach matters to seperate groups from generic volumes, it is now required to use existing seperate groups in order to reach and utilise generic volumes. The difference may seem subtle at first, but is extremely significant and has deep consequences for customers and customer groups. EA is a prime example, because in many ways they create the trends that are shaping this industry. And yes, EA specifically collects resources to match their vision, their targets, their money. Developers, just like the computers they use, just like the customers expected to buy quietly and all resources. EA tunes all resources to maximise its strategies and gains. This is an industry. Nothing more, nothing less. It really is no surprise that EA managed to beat one of the most corrupt banks with the most desdain for its customers with its customer support ratings. It is a non factor for how such enterprises function. It is not about the customer, not about the developer, it is not about the resources. It is about maximising gain (which includes gaining control over trends in how the industry itself develops). That is the idea behind business. I'm talking about art. These two different mindsets tend to contradict themselves. When it comes to things of need, and things of use, yes the business model of wondering what it can do for others is a good mindset to have. When it comes to creating something that is more or less art(video games are works of art in my opinion) you want to follow your vision first. It doesn't hurt to take in suggestions but letting your "fanbase" run how the game turns out is far too risky and more likely than not results in too many disappointed. You simply cannot please everyone.
  8. Trading

    Yeah. Transactions are the only thing making my city float. My city brings in -2k but makes 360k off of the things I sell to the global market. I did just start a great works, and I'm a little worried the providing of resources might have a drastic effect on my revenue.
  9. Do these things even work? I placed them thinking they would fly around and put out fires and fight crime but I have found that they just sat there at their respective departments so I turned them off since they are expensive. I also noticed my HAZMAT trucks got lost doing something too. About a quarter mile down the road from the fire department a hazmat fire went uncontested. I also think those trucks should be unlockable from the standard fire department.
  10. How RCI works

    My main solution has always been to just expand, expand, expand. With such small city sizes this has made things quite difficult since I prefer to build out before I have to build up. The only reason why my city is alive and not broke is because my city makes like 360k off of the alloy and metal it produces which I mine up. I've been slowly building neighboring cities where I have been moving utilities too which is where I stick to building out.
  11. I personally don't see a problem with a developer coming up with an idea they like and running with it. That is how all great games come into existence in the first place. They don't exactly make a game thinking "oh, this is what the fanbase wants!" because there generally is no fanbase. No, in the early days people just came up with stuff. The problem I see is though is you are taking an existing idea and trying to redesign it instead of expanding on what makes this game unique compared to the ones made in the past. Its a fine line to cross. I don't think EA hires developers to design games they want to make rather what will make them the most money.
  12. The future of Sim City

    The best thing they added to this game was the inclusion of specializations. Adds a whole other level of gaming. I like the resource gathering, and trading, and refining and all that goes along with it. I just wish the map sizes were a little bigger. SC4 was amazing. I haven't played it in like 8 years but it simply had so much to it and the modding community with all the buildings to download really made for some fantastic skylines. I too wonder if player driven content will go the way of the dodo over DLC driven content.
  13. How to Obliterate a City

    Instead of bulldozing you could just unlock some lovely disasters and let that take care of the mess.
  14. Greediest DLC set up I've ever seen. Usually games that have costly single items don't and they tend to be free to play. I personally wouldn't mind them saving it for an expansion instead.
  15. Maxis: Could we have built a subset offline mode? Yes.

    What I got from it was that thousands of EA shareholders wanted it this way. The online aspect wouldn't be so bad if it existed. I've started 2 regions and I'm the only one in them, and I can't find an available region to start with a bunch of players. So this vision just doesn't seem to exist. You could still have offline regions. Why not cater to both groups, and possibly save money on having so many servers to support this online crap.
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