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Found 35 results

  1. Ancient Egypt

    Today, we're traveling back to 2500 BCE to Ancient Egypt to take a look some of the greatest man made wonders of all time, along with some of the stunning surrounding landscape. We begin with the The Great Sphinx of Giza - the most recognizable statue of Ancient Egypt - and even to this day, it remains one of the world's most famous statues. It features a lion's body with the head of an Egyptian king - and was carved of out limestone most likely during the reign of King Khafre (2558-2532 BCE). The Nile River was truly vital to Ancient Egypt in a number of ways - not just for crops and irrigation, but for also allowing ships to sail from city to city. Small docks like this one lined the edge of the river. The land surrounding the Nile River was nutrient rich, and had excellent farming conditions. The ancient Egyptians called the soil "The Gift of the Nile" - and a variety of crops could be planted such as wheat, figs, barley, melons, and figs. We move on to the pyramids - it took three generations to complete this complex, and it was well worth the wait. Despite their condition today - the pyramids were once coated in polished white limestone - one of the most incredible sights imaginable. Each pyramid has a series of chambers underneath - and are believed to be tombs for their namesakes. The Pyramid of Khufu - also known as the Great Pyramid of Giza - was the largest of these pyramids. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to still remain to this day. The Pyramid of Khafre is the second largest of the Pyramids (although it might look taller due the fact it's on a higher elevation) - but has a much more elaborate complex of chambers and was also once connected to the Sphinx by a walkway. The Pyramid of Menkaure was the smallest of the three - to set it apart and to give it a unique look, the lower portion is encased in granite. Finally, some overviews of the entire area. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Big thanks to @tariely, @redfox85, @RandyE, @RobertLM78, @raynev1, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @CorinaMarie, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @The British Sausage, @Akallan, @Elenphor, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, & @SC4L0ver for the likes on the preview!
  2. London - The City & The Shard

    Our trip to London continues with another look at its incredible skyline. After taking a look at Canary Wharf in the first update, we're taking a look at London's other main financial district - The City of London, also known as The City, along with The Shard today. One of the city's most distinctive skyscrapers is the 591 foot tall 30 St Mary Axe (also referred to as the Gherkin, due its resemblance to a cucumber). Since opening in 2004, it has received many awards for its unique style and ecological footprint. Three of London's tallest buildings (from left to right) - Tower 42 (Completed 1980, 600 feet tall), 99 Bishopsgate (Completed 1976, 341 feet tall), and 122 Leadenhall Street (Completed 2014, 738 feet tall - also known as the cheese grater) Another rainy day in London. A couple various shots of The City. The Shard has become one of London's most recognizable buildings since opening in 2013 - rising 86 floors and 1,016 feet tall, its the tallest building in the United Kingdom and offers breathtaking views from the top. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Previous Update: "London - Canary Wharf" Big thanks to @kschmidt, @Toby Ferrian, @CorinaMarie, @TekindusT, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @huzman, @matias93, @_Michael, @Angry Mozart, @tariely. @tonyr, @The British Sausage, @Talla 2XLC, @mike_oxlong, @kingofsimcity, @redfox85, @Oerk, @bobolee, @bladeberkman, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @Odainsaker, & @Marushine for all the likes & reactions!
  3. Ancient Egypt (Preview)

    Ancient Egypt (Preview) Ancient Egypt has always been a personal favorite place of mine - and I'm finally making it a reality in SC4. I recently found an awesome model online which I exported into a number of parts and assembled it in the game.. and the results are impressive. (If anyone is really interested in it, I'll try to contact the author to see if I can re upload it). From there it was a matter of custom lotting it and carefully removing the base textures - if anyone's interested, I did a guide on that process in my Year In Review entry. I'm planning on doing another detailed guide though soon on that and some other things. Anyways, I'm putting the finishing touches on this scene - its covering the Pyramids, Sphinx, Nile River, and some of the surrounding farmland.. expect to see the full update very soon! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - Landmarks" Big thanks to @Tonraq,@Odainsaker, @RobertLM78, @bladeberkman, @tariely, @CorinaMarie, @Mr Saturn64, @Cyclone Boom, @nRVOUS, @kingofsimcity, @mike_oxlong, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @matias93, @jakis, @Fantozzi, @Pluispixel, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @The British Sausage, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @Akallan, @redfox85, @bobolee, @Angry Mozart, @sucram17, @SC4L0ver. @Krasner, @kelistmac, @europe.au, @geminijen, @Simmer2, @gigius76, & @raynev1 for all the likes!
  4. London - Landmarks

    For the final chapter of London, we're taking a look at some more of the city's most iconic landmarks. We begin with a look back in time to the 1200s - to the Old London Bridge. Constructed in 1209 - this bridge stood for over 600 years as the main route across the River Thames. While long gone, various drawings from the era depict a bustling bridge surrounded by medieval houses on both sides. Unfortunately, the design of the bridge led to its ultimate demise, as it impeded river traffic - and was eventually demolished in the 1800s to make way for a more modern bridge. The next stop is one of London's most awe-inspiring buildings - St. Paul's Cathedral. Designed by famed architect Christopher Wren and opened in 1708, it was part of a major rebuilding program after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The cathedral serves as the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London - and is one of the city's most popular attractions as well. The London Eye is one of the city's most popular attractions - located on the banks of the River Thames, it was the world's largest Ferris wheel when completed in 2000. If you can get past the long lines, the views of the city's South Bank from the top are incredible. We continue on with a trip to one of London's most famous bridges - Tower Bridge. Not to be confused with the original London Bridge (as seen in the first picture, since replaced with more modern versions) - this Victorian Gothic landmark has been one of the city's most distinctive sights since its completion in 1894. Close by Tower Bridge is another one of the city's famous landmarks - the Tower of London. This historic structure was built back in the 1190s and has served as a fortress, palace, and prison. Our next stop is one of the city's most famous squares - Trafalgar Square. Its named after the famed Battle of Trafalgar - a key British naval victory in 1805 - and it's been a popular gathering place for people (and pigeons) since 1840. The iconic Nelson's Column in the middle of the square is one of the city's most famous monuments. Our last stop is one of the world's most iconic buildings - Big Ben. This famous clock tower is located on the north end of the Palace of Westminster and has chimed since 1859. Recent maintenance repairs though means you'll have to wait until 2021 to hear it regularly again. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - The City & The Shard" Big thanks to @matias93, @RobertLM78, @The British Sausage, @Angry Mozart, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @bobolee, @nos.17, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @APSMS, @mike_oxlong, @mattb325, @SC4L0ver, @Mr Saturn64, @Dreadnought, @tonyr, @jakis, @Neto Dari, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Tonraq, @Elenphor, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
  5. Paris (Pt. 3/3)

    Our trip to Paris continues with a trip to the Sacré-Cœur Basilica (Basilica of the Sacred Heart of Paris) - one of Paris' most beautiful churches, often drawing comparisons to the Taj Mahal. Located on top of a small hill in the heart of the city, the church is visible for miles around. The next stop is Place de la Concorde - Paris' most famous square. Originally designed in 1755, this square is unlike anything else in the city - complete with a massive authentic Egyptian obelisk in the middle. The Panthéon, located in Paris' Latin Quarter, is another one of the cities most famed landmarks. Originally modeled after Rome's Pantheon and built as a church - it now functions as a mausoleum for many of France's most famous citizens. The Bourse de commerce is one of the city's most unique buildings, both in shape and function. It was originally used as a place to trade grain upon completion in 1763, then as a stock exchange, and more recently, plans are underway to transform it into a major art museum. The 689 foot tall Tour Montparnasse is the tallest skyscraper in Paris - and is hard to miss. Upon completion in 1973, the building was heavily criticized for its style and for being out of place - and as a result, buildings over 7 stories tall were banned from the city center. A massive renovation is slated to begin in 2019. Our tour of Paris ends with one of the city's most famous landmarks - the Arc de Triomphe. Built between 1803 and 1836, this iconic monument serves as a tribute to French soldiers lost in wars and has important military leaders engraved on its walls. For those wishing to get up close - make sure you use the underground tunnels instead of dodging the traffic.. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 2/3)" Big thanks to @CorinaMarie, @Odainsaker, @MushyMushy, @matias93, @Angry Mozart, @RobertLM78, @Silur, @_Michael, @The British Sausage, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @Manuel-ito, @redfox85, @Fantozzi, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @bobolee, @raynev1, @APSMS, @SC4L0ver, @gigius76, @bladeberkman, @kingofsimcity, @Haljackey, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @jakis, @Talla 2XLC, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  6. Paris (Pt. 2/3)

    Our tour picks back up with a trip to La Madeleine - one of the city's most recognizable churches. Originally designed as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army - its Greek style sets it apart from the rest. Since its completion in 1842, it's been one of the most popular attractions in the city. The Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe is one of the most beautiful theaters in the city and one of France's six national theaters. The Palais Garnier is one of Paris' most grand opera houses - opened in 1875, it's a true masterpiece. The next stop is one of Paris' most unique landmarks - the Centre Pompidou. Completed in 1977, this enormous colored building is covered in a maze of pipes going in every direction - and has housed a popular art museum ever since. (Animation might take a little bit to completely load) Our last stop today is one of the world's most famous landmarks - the Eiffel Tower. Completed in 1889 for the Universal Exposition to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution - this 986 foot tall tower became the world's tallest freestanding structure for over 40 years. It's remained an icon of Paris and France ever since. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 1/3)" Big thanks to @kingofsimcity, @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @RobertLM78, @huzman, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Manuel-ito, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Silur, @redfox85, @Tyberius06, @Andrey km, @bobolee, @MushyMushy, @The British Sausage, @mrsmartman, @matias93, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Girafe, @jakis, @feyss, @martijn.1, @Transport, & @Elenphor for all the likes!
  7. Prague

    Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic and one of the most picturesque cities in all of Europe. It's a city steeped in history - once the capital of the kingdom of Bohemia, its been a cultural, political, and economic center for centuries. The first stop in our tour is the Petrín Lookout Tower - located at the top of a small hill, this 62m tall Eiffel Tower lookalike offers stunning views of the city. Not too far away is another one of Prague's famous landmarks - St. Vitus Cathedral. Construction took nearly 600 years, finally completing in 1929 - but this magnificent Gothic cathedral was well worth the wait. Countless religious and coronation ceremonies have been held here - making it one of the most important landmarks in the city. To make it into the old town, you'll have to cross the Charles Bridge, spanning the Vlatva River. Completed in 1402, this stunning Gothic styled bridge is one of Prague's most famous landmarks and one of the world's most famous bridges. We've made it into the famed old town. With the incredible Týn Church and Astronomical Clock close by, this stunning town square is steeped in history. The aforementioned Týn Church (fully known as the Church of Our Lady before Týn) is one of the world's most beautiful Gothic churches - built back in the mid 1400s and completed by the mid 1600s, it towers some 260 feet above the surrounding rooftops of Prague. The cathedral also serves as a gallery of Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque works - its a historic site in Prague that anyone visiting here should be sure to visit. Like many other similar cities and towns across Bohemia and Central Europe, Prague enjoys a rich tradition of Christmas markets. Starting in early December and ending by early January, the stalls here have an unbelievable amount of goods on sale - from treats, decorations, handmade goods and more. For those braving the elements - the selection is second to none and its a trip you won't soon forget. No Christmas market is complete though of course without an enormous Christmas tree - and the ones here can get as high as 100 feet tall, making it truly a sight to behold. Once nightfall hits and the snow begins to clear - you can get a clear view of the twinkling lights and all the magic this place has to offer. Another one of Prague's famed traditions is the legendary fireworks display that takes place on New Year's Eve - the entire town gathers in the square and surrounding streets to take in the breathtaking views. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Elenphor, @The British Sausage, @Oerk, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Neto Dari, @TekindusT, & @mrsmartman for all the likes!
  8. Paris (Pt. 1/3)

    Paris is the capital and largest city of France and has been one of the world's most important cities for centuries. This timeless city is known for its fashion, food, literature, entertainment, and culture. In addition, it's widely known as being an important international business and commerce center - making it a truly global city. Paris also boasts some of the world's finest architecture and much of the city was renovated in the mid 1800s by architect Georges-Eugène Haussmann. Over the next three updates we'll be taking a look at some of its most iconic sights and landmarks. We'll begin with a trip down one of the city's most famous avenues - the Champs-Élysées. First completed in 1670 and redeveloped many times since, its impressive tree-lined streets are surrounded by many of the city's most luxurious shops, cafes, and theaters. On Bastille Day (July 14th), it's also home to the largest military parade in Europe. The next stop is one of the city's most stunning cathedrals, the famous Notre-Dame de Paris. Opened in 1345, this awe-inspiring building is considered to be one of the world's finest examples of French Gothic architecture. La Défense is Europe's largest purpose built business district and is where you'll find just about all of Paris' skyscrapers. The uniquely shaped Grande Arche in the middle is the centerpiece of the district - opened in 1989, it serves as a monument for the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution. The Louvre is another one of Paris' premier destinations - inside you'll find the famous Mona Lisa in its art museum. Our last stop for today is the Gare du Nord - first built back in 1846, this famous train station has been rebuilt time and time again to expand it's capacity. Today, it's the world's busiest train station outside of Japan and connects Paris with a number of other cities across France. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Prague" Big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @RobertLM78, @mrsmartman, @Oerk, @The British Sausage, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @bladeberkman, @mike_oxlong, @RandyE, @Odainsaker, @bobolee, @Talla 2XLC, @Manuel-ito, @tariely, @raynev1, @redfox85, @SC4L0ver, @Simmer2, @kingofsimcity, @Jonas_Chaves, & @Nenitosoyyo for all the likes!
  9. Cephalonia (Countryside & Overviews)

    Our journey to Cephalonia concludes with one last trip through the countryside. From the winding roads, small farms, and stunning natural beauty - there's so many things that makes this island so beautiful, and makes it a fitting way to end our trip. Additionally, I'll be showcasing some more overviews of Cephalonia. We were last at Myrtos Beach - and after a fun day at the beach, we made accommodations at the nearby Plaza Myrtos for the night. Once nightfall hits, the only lights you'll find in the distance are that of the occasional boat or two. It's quiet and peaceful - but also quite beautiful. Our room in the villa happens to overlook the edge of the beach - so we get an excellent view of the sunrise. Fortunately, we didn't have to deal with any of the rain at the beach.. The rain finally lets up - but is quickly replaced by a blanket of thick fog for most of the evening. The Cephalonian countryside is crossed by a variety of winding roads. There's no such thing as a dull drive here - and between every twist and turn, the views are incredible. Small, charming churches like this one dot the countryside. Two last overviews of the Cephalonian countryside. And to wrap things up - a couple of full tile overviews. (Click for full size.) I hope you enjoyed your visit to Cephalonia! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Myrtos Beach)" Big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @RobertLM78, @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @redfox85, @bobolee, @_Michael, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @Manuel-ito, @mrsmartman, @Jonas_Chaves, @raynev1, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, & @Talla 2XLC for all the likes!
  10. Cephalonia (Myrtos Beach)

    Our next stop is Myrtos Beach - arguably the most beautiful location in all of Cephalonia. Due to it's remote location, you won't be able to reach it by foot - the only way to reach Myrtos Beach it is to traverse your way down a series of steep curves. If you're able to make it there however, you'll be rewarded greatly with warm waters, soft white sand, and the view of a lifetime. The day starts early for anyone wanting a prime spot at the beach - and the roads throughout the surrounding countryside are already starting to fill up with cars. The roads slowly start to get steeper and steeper - a sign that we're getting closer to the beach. As we start to see scree slopes dot the surrounding hills - it means we're just about there. We stop at an overlook and get our first good look of the beach. It's quite stunning.. but the first order of business is how to get down there. There's only one way, and it's not for the faint of the heart. A steep road filled with hairpin curves traverses down the mountainside - and when it gets busy, it only becomes that much more intimidating. But if you can make it down to the bottom, you'll be rewarded greatly. We're finally at the beach! We get a great spot and start soaking up the sun. A couple of Myrtos Beach panoramas (click for full-size). The beach in all its glory. If you can get past the huge crowds, there's really no other place like it on Cephalonia. It's a truly stunning natural wonder. And finally, various views of the beach and surrounding countryside from above. Myrtos Beach is truly a quite a sight to behold. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Rural Scenes)" Big thanks to @Artimus, @CorinaMarie, @Fantozzi, @Manuel-ito, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, @_Michael, @RobertLM78, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Maloskero, @mrsmartman, @Neto Dari, @Marushine, @bobolee, @Prophet42, @Odainsaker, @redfox85, @GoKingsGo, & @SC4L0ver for all the likes!
  11. Cephalonia (Rural Scenes)

    For our next chapter of Cephalonia, we stay in the countryside - but this time, focusing on the small village of Anomeria and a number of surrounding rural scenes. Quaint villages like these dot the landscape for as far as the eye can see - while they may be small, they more than make up for it with their charm and character. Early morning in rural Greece is truly special - there's really nothing else like it. While most days are sunny and beautiful here - it's not uncommon for fog to roll in at the blink of an eye. ... rain showers are probably the only thing that can spoil your day here. But the rain is usually gone as quick as it rolls in. The golden sunsets of rural Greece are something that you don't want to miss out on. Nighttime here is quiet, yet beautiful. For centuries, small plots of land lined with stone walls have dotted the landscape. They're a cheap, efficient way to divide up fields. When viewed from above - rural Greece can be quite stunning. Myrtos Beach is off in the distance - and it happens to be our next destination Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Farmland)" Big thanks to @MushyMushy, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, @Toby Ferrian, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @Oerk, @Artimus, @redfox85, @bobolee, @_Michael, @Manuel-ito, @raynev1, @The British Sausage, @Elenphor, @Marushine, @Dirktator, @mrsmartman, & @JP Schriefer for all the likes!
  12. Cephalonia (Waterside)

    It's impossible to imagine Greece without the sea - so it's only fitting that we start our tour of Cephalonia with some scenes from the surrounding Ionian Sea. Thousands of years ago, Greek fleets once crossed these waters, engaging in massive wars. While things may be quite a bit different these days - the sea still remains vital. From enjoying a day out in the sun to taking your boat out on a cruise - this is one of the most picturesque locations in the entire Mediterranean. We begin with one of the many campgrounds that overlook the water here. It's difficult to imagine a more beautiful location. Hot air balloons are one of the best ways to view the island - the views from above are simply incredible. For those seeking a thrill - hang gliding is a popular activity throughout the region! While whale spottings are rare in this part of Greece - if you keep your eyes out, you just might get lucky and spot a few. Early mornings on the beach are spectacular. Quieter crowds and beautiful golden sunrises make this a great time to visit. Even in misty weather - the landscapes here are magical. The only concern might be the occasional rain shower.. If hang gliding wasn't enough adventure - you can also try out paragliding. With landscapes this stunning and crowds growing in the summer months - one hot air balloon might not be enough. The steep roads here that overlook the ocean offer some truly incredible views. The surrounding farmland of Cephalonia is just as beautiful - and it's where we'll be headed to next. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia: Introduction" Big thanks to @mike_oxlong, @GoKingsGo, @RobertLM78, @RandyE, @_Michael, @Fantozzi, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @Toby Ferrian, @sucram17, @Elenphor, @matias93, @TMTS, @redfox85, @raynev1, @Marushine, @Odainsaker, @kingofsimcity, @bobolee, @juliok92012, @scotttbarry, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  13. Cephalonia (Farmland)

    One of the most beautiful sights in all of Cephalonia are the many rural farms that flank the hillsides. Despite Greece being infamously poor for farming (in ancient times, they would actually import many of their crops from other countries such as Egypt due to poor soil conditions) - conditions are just good enough here that a number of crops are able to grow. It's a simple beauty that makes it so special, one that has lasted for thousands of years. Small farmhouses like this one dot the landscape - with olives, wheat, and grapes being vital crops. In springtime, the blooming flowers put on a beautiful display - complimenting the natural beauty of the region. Sunsets here are quite magical. The Ancient Greeks needed a crop that would grow on the rough, rugged hillsides. That crop was olives - and these groves have dotted the Cephalonian landscape for thousands of years. Today, Greece is the world's third largest olive exporter - for many here, getting a good harvest is crucial. The rural roads here are quite beautiful. Surrounded by rows of cypress trees and endless fields - there's not many drives out there that can compare. Finding them is quite rare - but the occasional sunflower patch makes for a beautiful contrast of colors. The long abandoned farmhouse.. When viewed from above - you can really get a complete grasp of how beautiful Cephalonia is and everything it has to offer. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Cephalonia (Waterside)" Big thanks to @redfox85, @RobertLM78, @Artimus, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @bladeberkman, @Toby Ferrian, @scotttbarry, @CorinaMarie, @mike_oxlong, @TMTS, @mrsmartman, @Odainsaker, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @raynev1, @tariely, @GoKingsGo, @Namiko, @APSMS, @_Michael, & @Prophet42 for all the likes!
  14. Moscow

    For anyone going to Moscow, a trip down the heart of the city is a must. We begin our journey with a drive down Tverskaya Street - the most well-known road in all of Moscow. This crowded shopping district has existed since the 12th century, and the streets are lined with historic architecture wherever you look. Even with some light rain, its Russian charm is still undeniable. As we make our way around the city, the rain begins to pick up considerably. Endless rows of commie blocks dominate the surrounding landscape - their bleak repetitiveness serves as a fitting backdrop to the elements. October brings the first snow of the year - creating a beautiful atmosphere around many of Moscow's most famous landmarks such as the Lomonossov Moscow State University. Completed in 1953, its imposing facade has served as the perfect symbol of Moscow - a powerful city that serves as the financial, political, and economic capital of Russia. Once the calendar crosses over into December, temperatures plunge into the negatives as the entire city turns into a winter wonderland. Moscow is one of the coldest major cities in the world - with temperatures as low as -44F being recorded, it takes a lot to brave these months. While it may be cold outside, it's not cold enough to stop us from visiting one of Moscow's most famous tourist attractions, Red Square. Few places on earth can boast such a collection of historic buildings in one location - with the Kremlin, State Museum, St. Basil's Cathedral, and many more within walking distance. Once the seasons change and the elements begin to clear up, a beautiful, sleek city emerges. Despite still being in construction, the Moscow International Business Center (Moscow City) boasts one of the most impressive skylines in all of Europe (and in the world). Its one of a kind collection of skyscrapers on the banks of the Moskva River include the Federation Tower, City of Capitals, and Naberezhnaya Tower - all of which are equally stunning. While Moscow may be known for it's past historic architecture, Moscow City makes it clear that this is also a city with an eye on the future. NOTE: Two of these scenes (Moscow City & Red Square) feature a handful of sketchup models from sites like 3d warehouse, as there were no close replacements for certain buildings I needed. These are real models imported into the game with 3dsmax, they are like any other BAT you would use. Some editing was done though to add effects like extra nightlights and snow. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "2016: Year in Review"
  15. Tour of Africa: Central Africa

    The tour resumes as we look towards one of Africa's most iconic natural wonders - the legendary Mount Kilimanjaro. Standing some 19,341 feet tall - its Africa's tallest mountain and one of its most popular climbing destinations. Despite its height, its a relatively easy climb - its essentially a big trek to the top - but what you do need to watch out for here is the very real risk of altitude sickness. While the top might not be as impressive as it once was with many of its iconic glaciers melting due to climate change - it still offers some of the most incredible views the world has to offer. From Kilimanjaro, we travel north into Kenya to witness some of Africa's most stunning wildlife. Our first stop is the incredible Masai Mara National Reserve - home to some of the best wildlife on the face of the planet. You'll find elephants, giraffes, zebras, lions, wildebeest, and countless others roaming these lands - even with declining numbers in recent years, there's still plenty here to observe and stare at in awe. The best way though to view them though is high above in a hot air balloon - despite the cost, its still certainly an experience that you won't want to miss out on. We continue north to another one of Kenya's wildlife gems - the incredible Lake Logipi. This algae-infested rift valley lake is home to countless lesser flamingos each year during migration - they make for a truly stunning sight among the many hot springs and geysers that dot the shoreline. Further north is where you'll find what some call the world's biggest swamp: the Sudd of South Sudan. The very name "Sudd" is Arabic for barrier or obstruction - and that's just what this swamp has been for thousands of years for the locals and outsiders alike. Not even the Roman Empire could get past it - Emperor Nero himself sent his troops up the White Nile, but the Sudd prevented any further colonization. These swamps have also have made the search for the source of the White Nile particularly difficult - its simply that big and difficult to navigate. Despite the nature of the swamps, the locals have lived here for thousands of years, usually setting up small huts on various islands across the swamps. Although seeing wildlife here can be rare - its still possible to see a thundering herd of elephants now and then making their way across the swamp. We begin making our way back down south through the rural landscapes of the Great Rift Valley. For as far as the eye can see, the lands here are crossed by an intricate pattern of huts and farmland, providing the locals just enough to make a living off of. Our final stop in Central Africa is another one of Africa's premier natural wonders - majestic Victoria Falls. The tribes here call it "the smoke that thunders" - which seems quite fitting as you can hear the water cascading down these sheer cliffs from miles away. At 355 feet tall, these might not be the world's tallest waterfalls - but they're certainly one of the most awe-inspiring - and a destination that anyone visiting here won't want to miss. (No photoshop used on the scene below) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: East Africa" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @Toby Ferrian, @Urban Constanta, @Manuel-ito, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @nRVOUS, @RandyE, @SC4L0ver, @bobolee, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Namiko, @mattb325, @mrsmartman, @kelistmac, @matias93, @Marushine, @Jonas_Chaves, & @Akallan for all the likes!
  16. Tour of Africa: East Africa

    The tour continues on as we make our way to Madagascar and the many unique destinations that dot the shorelines. Our first stop however, will be at one of the many quaint fishing villages along the shore. The friendly locals have been fishing in these waters for centuries, and it remains one of the most vital economic activities in this part of the world. After a couple of days driving through the barren landscapes of rural Madagascar - we finally reach the stunning natural wonder of Isalo Massif. This national park is well known for its unique plant and animal life - and looks like something that came straight out of the Jurassic era. Hiking is popular in these parts, but do be careful - many of the rocks here are crumbling and it can be a long ways down.. On the west coast of Madagascar is where you'll find one of its most famed attractions - the endless forests of baobab trees. These are some of the most unique trees in the world - reaching heights as tall as 100 ft, they're hard to miss - and every trip to Madagascar should include a visit here. However, as with many natural wonders across the world - human activity has had a profound impact here, and could continue to cause bigger issues down the road. The trees originally didn't grow in isolated patches, but were once instead part of a great forest - one that's been cut down to a small fraction of its original size. While the locals have left the baobabs as a sign of respect, it should be noted that this area isn't a national park and could very well be subject to further deforestation and human activity in the years to come. Not too far away from the baobabs is where you'll find another one of Madagascar's wonders - Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park. These majestic karst formations have been carved into razor sharp pinnacles by groundwater and the elements, and this dramatic forest of stone is a destination that you won't want to miss. Plenty of unique plants and animals are found here as well, thriving in the unique elements - making for a truly unique trip. We board our boat and make our way back to the mainland, where we'll spend the next couple of days visiting a few more of the stunning villages that dot the shorelines of Mozambique. Between the pristine blue water, unique architecture, and perfect weather - there's few places in Africa that can rival their beauty. We move into the mainland, and the next destination is the wildlife haven of Serengeti National Park in northern Tanzania. With plentiful populations of giraffes and other unique animals, its a must-visit destination - and if you're lucky, you might even spot a couple of rare black rhinos along the way as well. Be on the lookout though for giraffe in particular - you never know when they might cross the road, feet away from your car.. The last stop is one of Africa's most beautiful and deadly locations - the stunning crater and lava lake of 11,385 foot tall Mount Nyiragongo. This volcano has a long history of violent eruptions, and with the last eruption coming in 2016 - you never know when it might be set off again. For the particularly adventurous tourist - you can hike up to the steep crater rim and take in stunning views of the world's largest lava lake. (No photoshop used - this goes for the previous one too. The lava lake is a big custom texture & prop I made, along with a couple Maxis smoke animations.) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Southern Africa" Big thanks to @Manuel-ito, @RandyE, @bladeberkman, @Fantozzi, @RobertLM78, @huzman, @Toby Ferrian, @_Michael, @CorinaMarie, @scotttbarry, @TekindusT, @bobolee, @Odainsaker, @mike_oxlong, @nRVOUS, @GoKingsGo, @raynev1, @Marushine, @The British Sausage, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @matias93, @Neto Dari, @Jonas_Chaves, @Akallan, @Namiko, & @Elenphor for all the likes!
  17. Not based on any area. Just named it California after just coming back from a long road trip around South West America and getting a bit of inspiration. Wanted to start a new project and love the Cleyra map so aiming initially for nothing too big but detailed so thought I'd get some pictures along the way. Hope you enjoy...
  18. Tour of Africa: Johannesburg

    Our Tour of Africa begins with one of Africa's most iconic cities - Johannesburg. With nearly 4 million people in its metropolitan area - this is South Africa's largest city, and has one of the best skylines in all of Africa. With a unique combination of various architecture styles and plenty of famous landmarks to boot - there's plenty to do and see here. The famous Orlando Power Station was in use for nearly 50 years - but since the late 90s, its been transformed into a tourist center, with colorful murals painted on its walls and base jumping becoming a popular activity. To make it into the city itself, one of the most traveled routes is over the Nelson Mandela Bridge - completed in 2003, its one of the most iconic landmarks in the city. Construction of the bridge was quite tricky, as it directly runs over 43 different rail lines - but construction was completed without disrupting any of them, and its been a popular tourist attraction ever since. At night, this bridge turns into a spectacle - for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the bridge's lighting system was upgraded extensively, and a new rainbow colored scheme was installed. If you can make it here at night - the striking color show will certainly be worth it. We've made it into the CBD - and there's no better time to see the city than during a beautiful South African sunset. Despite a little fog and rain - the landmarks here are still quite stunning, like the Carlton Centre. Completed in 1973, its been the tallest office building in Africa ever since. At night is when the city really begins to come alive, however. The streets of Johannesburg are typical of any other African metropolis - there's people and cars filling every last inch of pavement. It may be chaotic, but the life and energy of these streets makes visiting this city a special experience. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Introduction" Thanks to @Namiko, @GoKingsGo, @Yarahi, @Tonraq, @juliok92012, @AlexSLM520, @RandyE, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @scotttbarry, @nos.17, @mattb325, @matias93, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Marushine, @_Michael, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, & @Toby Ferrian for all the likes!
  19. Scenes From South America

    Our journey to South America begins in Baños, Ecuador - located in the Eastern Andes, this popular tourist resort town offers lots to do. From restaurants, hot springs, waterfalls, and plenty of other activities to keep you occupied - its an excellent destination for anyone wanting to get a taste of the region. We won't be staying here long though, as the neighboring Amazon awaits.. While Baños may be located in the Andes Mountains - it's also known as the "Gateway to the Amazon" due to its close proximity to many of the Amazon River's tributaries and streams, offering a direct route into the jungle itself. We rent a boat from one of the locals, and we're soon on our way - into the dense, humid climate of the Amazon rainforest.. We travel deeper into the Amazon, and it might be hundreds of miles before we reach the next town or village. The locals here live simple lives - while some are tucked away so deep into the forest that they haven't been reached yet by civilization - others live on the shores of the Amazon and its tributaries with limited contact. We get a chance to meet a group of them, high up on their stilt houses - the brief glimpse into their lives and customary rituals is quite fascinating. In this part of South America - much of the local economy depends on important natural resources such as oil to keep afloat. Lake Maracaibo, located in northern Venezuela, has been vital for the locals - outside of the Middle East, this is one of the world's largest oil producers since oil was first discovered here back in 1914. Much of the land surrounding the lake is surrounded by endless fields of oil pumpjacks - they've quickly become a common symbol of the region. We head back into Brazil and the next stop will be a common sight in many of the major cities. From São Paulo to Rio de Janeiro - favelas dot the outskirts and creep up along the mountainous hillsides. The people here might not have a lot - but they make the best of their situation for them and their families, creating makeshift houses from whatever they can find. Some 1,000 miles west is where you'll find our next destination - one of South America's greatest cities, Buenos Aires. The mighty obelisco rises some 221 feet above the surrounding Plaza de la República and the spaciously wide 9 de Julio Avenue - commemorating the founding of the city back in 1536, its one of the main landmarks in the city and one of its premier destinations. Our final destination takes us back to the Andes - and although much of the land here is inhospitable and harsh, there's still a number of small, charming villages and towns that you'll want to check out. The small village of Tocanao in Chile stands on the edge of the Atacama Desert - despite the lack of rain (this is the driest area on the face of the planet) - the people here have adapted quite well, making the most of a few small streams that run close by. The bell tower here dates from 1750 - built from volcanic stone, its a unique landmark that's quite striking. Note: For this update (and others) - custom content creation has been vital. I've been creating custom road texture sets (this is only a small portion of it - there's about 20 or so for the Banos pic), BATing various small buildings from scratch (1, 2,), making HD water textures, and much more. I don't know if any of this stuff will make it to the exchange soon as there isn't any documentation, a number of small things still need to be fixed/improved, and I've also been extremely busy with my CJ lately. In the meantime though, if anyone is interested in these then just send me a PM. Additionally, about the last update - the obscure BATs were not photoshopped in (that would be waay too much photoshop in my book) - they're all ingame BATs I got from 3d warehouse. The Petra pic used a bit more photoshop than usual - I made it a long time ago when I was still messing around with PS - but the pic still uses an ingame BAT from 3d warehouse with some extra effects around it (added lights, made the cliffs look better.) Anyways, if I'm doing a scene and I need something from 3d warehouse, I'll import it into 3dsmax, render it, and use it as a prop in my scene. They are like any other BAT you would use. I already wrote a number of moderately in-depth guides on this in my other "South America" update here - I might consider doing this again (more in depth) if there's enough interest. Also, all of my scenes with the crazy road textures are really just a big flat prop (ingame props, not some sort of crazy photoshop effect. That would be an excessive amount of photoshop in my book). I'll make a big texture, place it on the prop in 3dsmax, render it, and use that prop in Lot Editor. So it isn't some sort of post processing effect, these are ingame props, no different than any other prop you would use. I already made a guide on this here in my "Year in Review" entry (the Pisa picture) so feel free to check it out. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: Ancient Ruins - Pt. II Big thanks hanks to @Fantozzi, @kingofsimcity, @RandyE, @_Michael, @MushyMushy, @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Yarahi, @mrsmartman, @mike_oxlong, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @tariely, @raynev1, @Dgmc2013, @GoKingsGo, @Ducio, @Namiko, @Akallan, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @Bastet69008, @schokoladeneis 1, @mattb325, @Elenphor, @Krasner, @juliok92012, @JP Schriefer, @Don_Pato, & @sucram17 for all the likes!
  20. Natural Wonders

    Our world is full of incredible natural wonders that keep us in awe. Today we're going to take a tour around the globe (except Antarctica - that's probably going to be a separate update down the road ) - visiting a few of the most unique and stunning natural wonders our planet has to offer. Note: this update contains a few gifs (4MB and 6MB) - it was difficult to get them any smaller. Africa Danakil Depression - Ethiopia Our first destination can be found in the hot, humid climate of northern Ethiopia. The alien like world of the Danakil Depression is known for its incredibly colorful sulfur pits - and also being the home of the hottest temperatures on earth. With temperatures reaching as high as 125 degrees, you won't be able to stay here long - just long enough to load up your camel with salt and continue on with the journey. Asia Sigiriya - Sri Lanka On the small island nation of Sri Lanka in South Asia is where you'll find our next location - the ancient rock fortress of Sigiriya. This stronghold was selected by King Kasyapa of the Ceylon civilization back in the mid 400s CE as a new capital - and it was truly ahead of its time. The original structure featured a massive city perched on top of the rock, with expansive gardens and trails leading around the entire structure. Little of it remains - but it continues to keep tourists in awe to this day. Australia Uluru (Ayers Rock) - Northern Territory When you think of Australia - one of the first things that comes to mind is its stunning Uluru (Ayers Rock), dramatically rising some 1,142 feet out of the outback. Uluru is the original aboriginal name for the area - and it has no specific meaning behind it. They believed that the rock has a great spiritual meaning - and was created at the dawn of time. To this day, those visiting it are urged not to climb the rock out of respect to these beliefs - and taking photographs of certain areas is also strongly urged against. Europe Holuhraun Lava Field - Iceland We're traveling to the Arctic for our next destination - the volatile and unpredictable Holuhraun Lava Field. This lava field is the size of Manhattan and its been growing at an unprecedented rate - and its also been spewing out a record-breaking amount of lava and sulfur dioxide in recent years. Hiking is surprisingly allowed here - but make sure you watch your step, especially with lava that can reach temperatures as high as 1,470 degrees Fahrenheit. North America Nares Strait - Canada/Greenland Border We're staying in the Arctic for our next sight - and you'll find the stunning Nares Strait located on Greenland's wild west coast. This pathway to the North Pole is lined with dramatic fjords and mountains - and with some of the most inhospitable temperatures on earth, every trip is an adventure. South America Devil's Throat (Iguazu Falls) - Brazil/Argentina Border Our tour wraps up with one of the most awe-inspiring destinations in all of South America - the majestic Devils's Throat of Iguazu Falls, located on the Brazil/Argentina border. This is a sight unlike any other on earth - water cascades from 3 different angles down nearly 300 feet of sheer rock, creating a thundering splash that can be heard for miles around. This is nature at its best - and its a destination that you won't want to miss out on. Note: a lot of these pictures required extensive custom content creation, and although it may look like it - there actually wasn't that much photoshop being used at all. The Iguazu Falls & Danakil Depression gifs are completely unedited - the in game animations were recorded using ScreenToGif. For those wondering where I got Sigiriya, it was downloaded here and imported into the game as a big BAT - some small editing was done though at the top to add things like better looking trees. Ayers Rock was made using the in game terraforming tools, but had a couple edits to the terrain mod and the clouds. As for the pics from the Arctic - the main use of photoshop was adding reflections to the water (in the Greenland pic), giving the lava a little life/making it glow a bit (the lava itself is real), and adding some mist/clouds in general as well. I created an entire set of textures for those pics - consisting of two parts. First one being just a simple terrain mod - consisting of fairly basic cliff/ground texture mods. Here's a demonstration of some of the base textures/cliff textures at work. Secondly, I also finally figured out a while back how to create overrides for the JENX terrain paints: 1, 2. And again, these aren't some sort of photoshop effect or whatever, they're just overrides of the in game terrain paints. For those interested, here's the pics completely unedited: here and here (the lava is usually supposed to be used at day, so I had to make some enhancements for the night time image.) So yeah, there's finally legit lava + glaciers in the game There's still plenty of work to be done and they don't have proper icons yet so they're sorta hard to use, so it could be a while for a release on anything. But as always, if anyone is interested in something then please PM me and I can send you what I've completed thus far. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Scenes From South America" @TekindusT Thank you! I really went all out on that Buenos Aires pic - took forever but it was worth it! @Bojci Thanks for stopping by! Appreciate the kind words @Dgmc2013 Thank you, appreciate the nice comment @tariely Thanks for the kind words! I'll try to incorporate more little tutorials and whatnot into my entries from time to time - and to show how I make them come to life. @mrsmartman Thank you! I'll hopefully try to do a few more of those in the future to show a bit of what goes into my scenes @IL. Thank you! Although I've done some very heavy photoshop pics for fun in the past, it's important to keep things in moderation. Photoshop had a minor role in the update - mainly for things like mist/clouds/rain effects, adding filters to give some of the pics to give them a unique character, and to also do a number of small cosmetic edits like adding power lines to the MMP'd poles in the Tocanao pic. All the buildings, MMPs, lots etc are real in the pics - containing a bunch of custom content I created along with creative uses of existing content. @GoKingsGo Thanks for the wonderful comment! @raynev1 Thanks for the kind words I've been thinking about it recently and I might try to fit them into some sort of prop pack along with some of the other models I've been working on. If you want them in the meantime though, feel free to PM me @Fantozzi Thanks for the nice comment As for the buildings I used in those pics, I believe I used the following: a rusty shack from Simmer2's prop pack vol3, some shacks from the fordoniak prop pack vol2, and the main buildings were from RDQ's prop pack and from Wallibuk's collection on the STEX. I used some of Maloskero's stuff too - he graciously sent me a decent amount of BATs that haven't been released yet though, so I think a few of the buildings in the pic might not be available yet. But I believe he is working currently on getting the other blds on the STEX here soon. Also, one last note - a few of the buildings I used had their roofs recolored to orange/red to give them a bit more of a South American flavor - hopefully that shouldn't be an issue though @Namiko Thanks! Yeah, that scene is hard to beat I'm gonna keep the updates coming too, I have a loooot of stuff I need to publish into updates.. @Mymyjp Thank you for the kind words! It would be great to see some more updates - I really enjoyed your work @Akallan Thanks for the comment! I've actually thought about Nordic countries, but the lack of BATs is a big issue. Especially the stave churches - I could texture one pretty good but unfortunately my modeling capabilities are lagging behind. I've found enough stuff though for Ancient Egypt so that's definitely going to happen @JP Schriefer Thanks for the nice comment as always @f3cs Thanks, glad you enjoyed it! @_Michael Thank you! I usually do big, massive scenes - so I wanted to change things up a little and do a few zoom 6 scenes like the Amazon river one, glad you liked it @dabadon5 Thank you! With each update, I really want to convey that feeling of being on a great adventure across the globe - so it's nice to hear that @RandyE Thanks for the comment Randy! It's quite amazing what we can create using the canvas of SC4 Finally, big thanks to @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @Fantozzi, @MushyMushy, @Dgmc2013, @tariely, @matias93, @Marushine, @mike_oxlong, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @Krasner, @_Michael, @bladeberkman, @Francis90b, @GoKingsGo, @raynev1, @Namiko, @mattb325, @scotttbarry, @Akallan, @JP Schriefer, @RandyE, & @APSMS for all the likes!
  21. Ancient Ruins - Pt. II

    For the second part of our tour, we begin by traveling to the Middle East to take a look at one of the world's most unique set of ruins - Petra. Founded by the Nabataean civilization as early as 312 BCE, this ancient sandstone city flourished for centuries - and the construction of the Treasury in the 1st century CE was a time of considerable growth and prosperity for the civilization. By 106 CE the Roman Empire captured the city - while Roman influence can be seen throughout the complex, they still thrived as a trade center for many more centuries. Eventually though, the Romans moved their trade capital from Petra and the entire city faded into obscurity and was abandoned shortly afterwards. The ruins have remained a mysterious landmark since then - in fact, the whole facade of the Treasury is riddled with bullet holes after Bedouin tribesmen tried to break in, hoping to recover riches inside. To this day, the entire complex remains a popular tourist attraction in the area - be sure to visit at night when the entire complex is lit up by a stunning display of candles - its one of the most magical experiences imaginable. For our next iconic ancient ruin - we're traveling to the rural farmlands of southern England. Stonehenge was built between 3200 and 2000 BCE - making it by far the oldest ruin on our list. The druids who built this megalith used ingenious methods to move these rocks around - and although its not entirely agreed upon, most believe that some sort of earth ramp was used to lift the stones into perfect position. There's no better time to visit here than during midsummer sunrise - the stones themselves align to it perfectly, making it a magical experience that's one of a kind. We'll be taking an extended look at the Roman Empire next - and there's no better place to start than the famous Roman Forum in the heart of Rome. This impressive set of ruins was once the heart of the city, with the likes of Julius Caesar and other important Roman leaders once crossing these grounds. After several sacks of Rome though that led to the fall of the empire during the 400s CE, many of the rocks and stones were plundered extensively, leaving the entire complex a shell of its former self. Excavations and restorations began in the 18th century - and although much of the original structure is long gone, you can still get a glimpse of what these walls once held. Our next stop within the ancient Roman Empire is the famous Colosseum. First opening back in 80 CE, its size couldn't be rivaled - more than 50,000 people could watch the many events that were held here. Aside from the gladiator fights - the Colosseum was used for just about everything and remained an important site in the empire for hundreds of years. While much of the structure has been lost to time or plundered by enemies - there's still much of it remaining, making it one of the most popular attractions not just in Italy - but also the world. Our final archeological site is none other than the famous ruins of Pompeii, Italy. This ancient Roman city was founded between the 6th and 7th century - and continued to grow and flourish as an important trading center for centuries. However, in 79 CE, nearby Mount Vesuvius exploded - covering the entire city under a blanket of ash and pyroclastic materials. Although most of the town's inhabitants survived (nearly 80% evacuated before the eruption) - an estimated 2,000 people still lost their lives on that fateful day. After a series of excavations starting in the 1700s, the entire city has became a massive tourist attraction and one of the world's premier archeological sites. NOTE: Pretty much all the models in this update were downloaded and imported into the game from sites like 3d warehouse, as there were no close replacements for certain buildings I needed. These are ingame models imported into the game with 3dsmax, they are like any other BAT you would use. Besides the Petra picture where I added the lights and made the cliffs look a bit better - there was very little photoshop used at all. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Rest of replies for "Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview)" @tariely Thanks for the kind words Yeah, I'd agree with you there, I could have probably added a couple more cars (I really wish there were more FA car props out there though). But, let's just say it's an early morning in Rome for now @mike_oxlong Thanks! Surprisingly my plugins folders aren't that big, but that's mainly because I have about 8 of them by now and I just swap them out constantly. Even if I could share my Plugins folders (I don't know if the admins would be down with that.. ).. you'd probably spend more time trying to navigate through my messy menus than actually playing the game @JP Schriefer Thanks! Glad you liked it. Petra has to be one of my personal faves so far And finally, big thanks to @scotttbarry, @AlexSLM520, @GoKingsGo, @Simmer2, @mrsmartman, @Akallan, @Odainsaker, @RandyE, @bobolee, @JP Schriefer, @tariely, @tonyr, @Manuel-ito, @_Michael, @Jolteon, @raynev1, @Fantozzi, & @kingofsimcity for all the likes!
  22. Southeast Asia

    Our journey to Southeast Asia begins with a trip through the scenic, mountainous landscape of northern Vietnam. For thousands of years, terraces have turned these hillsides into effective farmland - with rice being the staple crop for many. For as far as the eye can see, these terraces stretch on into the distance - a never ending showcase of simple, rural beauty. Our next stop is the mysterious Chocolate Hills of Bohol Island in The Philippines. Some 1,776 brownish-red hills dot the landscape for miles around, and a variety of wild myths try to explain their existence. Some legends state that the hills are the leftovers of massive pebbles thrown by giants many eons ago. Others believe that the hills have a cosmic connection, with each hill representing various stars and planets. No matter what the explanation, they still leave us in awe. The crater lakes of Kelimutu in Indonesia are one of the more remarkable destinations on our journey - the lakes are just as stunning as they are mesmerizing. The mineral rich water that fills each of these lakes changes color many times throughout the year, so each trip is truly a unique experience. Despite the ominous steam that emanates from the lakes, the volcano has actually been dormant for quite some time. Our next stop is the largest Buddhist monument in the world - Indonesia's Borobudur. Rain or shine, it's a truly impressive structure - we're amazed by the sheer quantity of artifacts on display. With over 2,500 relief panels and 500 Buddha statues lining the exterior, we've never seen anything like it before. Reaching the top brings incredible views of the surrounding landscape - but more importantly it signifies the end of a pilgrimage for Buddhists. As we start to head back north, a can't miss destination is Thailand's Phang Nga Bay, tucked away on the west coast of the country. With over 40 limestone islands jutting hundreds of feet into the air, it truly takes your breath away. We grab a boat and find a secluded beach on one of the islands - no better way to spend the day! As our journey begins to wind down, we make sure to visit one of the iconic landmarks of Southeast Asia - Cambodia's Angkor Wat. The world's largest religious monument never fails to disappoint - you could spend years exploring this vast complex. While the views from the outside are truly impressive, the interior is a different story. To our dismay, we find out that much of the complex has been looted in recent years, with bas-reliefs and relics fetching high prices on the black market. It'll take a little exploring around to find the rooms left in pristine condition - but it's certainly worth it. Our final stop is none other than one of the most impressive archeological sites in the world, Myanmar's Bagan. Over 10,000 pagodas were built on this vast desert plain nearly a thousand years ago - with a little over 2,200 remaining today. Despite constant earthquake damage (the ruins are built directly on top of a fault line) - the locals continue to rebuild these treasured ruins time and time again. No trip to Bagan is complete without a hot air balloon ride - despite the steep price, the incredible views for miles around make it a once in a lifetime experience. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Moscow"
  23. Central Asia

    Our journey to Central Asia begins with one of the greatest environmental tragedies of the 20th century - the shrinking Aral Sea. In 1960, it was the world's 4th largest lake with a surface area of over 26,000 sq mi - but with the rivers feeding it being diverted countless times for cotton farming, it's less than 10% of that size today. While there have been small improvements in the northern half with a recently completed dam, the rest of the lake is still in dire straights, with entire parts drying up completely in recent years. To make matters even worse, the exposed seabed is littered with harmful chemicals and cotton fertilizers - which have blown over the surrounding landscape, causing a whole host of health issues for the locals who still live in the area. The ship graveyard of Moynaq in Uzbekistan is an eerie reminder of the past - once a bustling port, the city now lies nearly 100 miles from shore. Further north past the Kazakhstan border is the city of Aral'sk - just like Moynaq, this city used to be a vital seaport in the region. Many people's entire livelihoods depended on their catches, using this port for years - but now all that remains is rusted cranes and ships lining the harbour. There is hope however. While the southern half is likely on it's last leg - the Dike Kokaral, built in 2005, has been restoring water levels in the northern half of the sea considerably in recent years. There's been talk about the city once again becoming a port - but it'll take quite some time to get there. The next destination is the Nurek Dam of Tajikistan - one of the most impressive sights in all of Central Asia. Towering some 997 feet above the town of Nurek, this Dam was built by the Soviet Union from 1961-1980 was once the tallest dam in the world. Since overtaken, it's still the largest earthen dam in the world - there's really nothing else that compares to it. For many people of central Asia, nomadic herding is a way of life. The steppes of Kyrgyzstan are an excellent place to do this with plenty of places for cattle to graze - and the many small creeks and steams that line the valleys make great places to set up a yurt as well. Evenings are special here - there's a simple beauty to watching the sun set over an endless field of grass. Our next stop is the sacred Namtso Lake, located high up on the Tibetan Plateau. The locals believe that the waters here are sacred and pure, bestowed by Buddha himself - and can wash away the sins of mankind. A number of stupas are located around the perimeter of the lake - used for meditation and to make offerings, they have a vital role in the life of a Buddhist. We climb further into Tibet and soon approach Lhasa and the Dalai Lama's home - the Potala Palace. This is one of the must see attractions of Tibet - towering above the surrounding landscape, it's been a sight to behold for well over a thousand years. Snowstorms here are rare, but when they do occur it makes for a magical atmosphere. Travel some 300 miles west and you'll come face to face with the world's tallest mountain, 29,029 ft Mount Everest (Everest seen in the middle - the world's 4th tallest, Lhotse, can be seen directly below it), located on the Tibet/Nepal border. First climbed in 1953 by Nepali Sherpa Tenzing Norgay and New Zealand mountaineer Edmund Hillary - some 5,600+ have made the ascent ever since. Despite relatively low fatality rates compared to other 8,000m+ mountains - make no mistake, this is still one of the deadliest mountains in the world, especially in winter. In winter, no mountain on the face of the planet is more terrifying than the world's second tallest peak, 28,251 ft K2, located on the Pakistan/China border. With winter temperatures routinely in the -40Cs, huge gusts of 30-50MPH winds, and regular avalanches - it's not hard to see why no one's ever made a winter ascent here. With only a little over 300 people making the ascent in total - it's one of the most difficult climbs in the world, and lives up to the name "The Savage Mountain". Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Southeast Asia"
  24. Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview)

    Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview) Our tour of the ancient world continues on.. after taking a look at a number of famous ruins from Central & South America in the first update, we're continuing on into Europe & Asia in Part II. I'm putting the finishing touches on a few more Roman ruin scenes so I hope to get the full update out soon... but here's a little bit of what I've done thus far: The Colosseum Petra by Night Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Ancient Ruins" @_Michael Thanks for the comment! I have a lot in store, hope to get it out soon. @TekindusT Thanks! That scene and model was a real pain to make, but I think it turned out quite nicely @kingofsimcity Thanks, glad you enjoyed it! I still have a trip or two left to "AncientSimCity" after this update.. so stay tuned @juliok92012 Thank you! @younghappy Thank you That sounds like quite the incredible trip I imagine! I didn't think that anyone would have been there before - that's pretty cool. Always neat to hear that it measures up to the real thing Thanks again to @Golhbul, @Akallan, @mike_oxlong, @Bastet69008, @aegian, @Simmer2, & @JP Schriefer for all the supportive comments! And finally, big thanks to @Golhbul, @kingofsimcity, @Manuel-ito, @Akallan, @scotttbarry, @tonyr, @raynev1, @RandyE, @Jolteon, @Fantozzi, @_Michael, @juliok92012, @mrsmartman, @mike_oxlong, @nRVOUS, @Jonas_Chaves, @Bastet69008, @aegian, @Marushine, @Oerk, @Elenphor, @Yarahi, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, @sucram17, @TMTS, @SC4L0ver, & @PHBSD for all the likes!
  25. Ancient Ruins (Preview)

    Ancient Ruins (Preview) So, as you may have seen in the past.. one of my favorite scenes to make in SC4 are ancient ruins. So I figured.. why not create an entire update (or two) devoted to just that? Right now, I'm creating a variety of scenes covering some of the world's greatest civilizations.. Azetc, Mayan, Incan, Roman, and maybe even a few that you haven't heard of I hope to get a full update out soon so stay tuned - but in the meantime, here's a little taste of what's to come: Former home of the great Mayan empire, located deep in the Yucatán rainforest... Chichén Itzá. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "South Asia" @scotttbarry Thanks for the comment! And wow, that sounds like quite the trip - I'm quite jealous! I actually downloaded the tomb models here and imported them into the game by 3dsmax. (And I did not know that story about Shah Jahan either ) @Manuel-ito Thank you! Yeah, it certainly took a while, fortunately it didn't take a week though I also agree with you in regards to the Maxis models - they get a bad rap for sure, but some of them are actually quite nice! @Haljackey Thanks! There's actually not as much photoshop as you would think - its mainly filters, fog, and adding some other small stuff. All the obscure buildings are real models from 3d warehouse or stuff I made in BAT. @Bastet69008 Thank you! Always cool to hear that in regards to the trixies @mike_oxlong Thanks! Yeah, I'd love to stay there too, atleast until I saw some of the prices lol. Not quite in my budget @aegian Thank you! It's just SC4 with a looooot of Custom content @RandyE Thanks Randy, I'm glad you enjoyed the trip @TekindusT Thanks for the great comment @tonyr Thank you! @sunda Obrigado! @elavery Thank you! Some of the stuff was BATed made by me, others were imported into the game through 3d warehouse and some other random sites. @sejr99999 Thanks I'm working on a number of custom models right now that I hope to eventually upload on the STEX along with some older stuff. A number of the models in that update came from 3d warehouse, though - the admins told me I can't distribute that stuff until I get the author's permission. If there's anything that you're after in particular, I can try to contact the author on 3d warehouse and see if they give me the go ahead - but I will say that its quite difficult to contact a lot of these authors. @Silur Thank you for the comment - glad you liked the Ganges scene! Just for clarification, though - all the models I use are real ingame models, with little to no editing. It's either stuff that I made or it comes from 3d warehouse of another site - I import the models into the game via 3dsmax. They're like any other BAT you would use in game. @mattb325 Thanks for the kind words And finally, big thanks to @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @CT14, @svenson, @Jolteon, @tariely, @raynev1, @Manuel-ito, @Haljackey, @nRVOUS, @MushyMushy, @Dgmc2013, @Dazzyls, @GoKingsGo, @Bastet69008, @mike_oxlong, @Jonas_Chaves, @nos.17, @RandyE, @aegian, @bobolee, @Pluispixel, @Fantozzi, @schokoladeneis 1, @tonyr, @juliok92012, @Andrey km, @mrsmartman, @SimCoug, @Silur, & @Maloskero for all the likes!
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