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Found 29 results

  1. Lake Niabarongo

    Hello everybody, A new project just got started and I wanted it to share. This is the first episode of populating a large central african lake area. A river gets created and most important: a hydropower dam is being build. Let me know what you think of it! To see the finished result (river & Dam) skip to minute 23:18 where the cinematic begins.
  2. Hello everybody, This is my very first Cities: Skylines Timelapse building episode. The goal of this series is to recreate a certain part of Namibia in cities skylines. Its going to be a short series of 3 Episodes until its finished. Let me know what you think!
  3. Tour of Africa: North Africa

    The tour continues as we venture into North Africa, and our first destination is the ancient royal capital city of Fez, Morocco. In the heart of Fez's medina (an ancient walled city, without streets) you can find the stunning Chouara Tannery, one of Africa's most unique wonders. For nearly a thousand years, the locals have been tanning and dying their hides here - if you can get past the pungent odor (its suggested to hold mint leaves near your nose while visiting) it's a destination that you won't want to miss. After an extended trek through the Sahara Desert - we find ourselves at the shores of one of Africa's disappearing wonders, the once great Lake Chad. Climate change and overuse by the locals have turned much of the lake bone dry, and its estimated that the lake is only about 1/20 of the size it once was back in the 1960's. While much of the lake is long gone - there's still a number of small communities dotting the receding shorelines, with the locals adapting to the changes and making the best of what they have. We venture back out into the Sahara - and for anyone traveling in these parts, its vital to know where the closest oasis is. Water is a precious resource here - and it could be hundreds of miles before you find the next closest source. After traveling east through the seemingly endless Sahara Desert - we finally reach the Red Sea. This salty, hot sea is some to some of the most unique animals and underwater flora in the world, and the coral reefs here are quite amazing. While other coral reefs around the world are slowly dying due to climate change - the ones here are unique in the fact that they don't bleach and are extraordinarily resistant to rising temperatures. We travel into Egypt - and no visit is complete without a trip to the legendary Nile River. The world's longest river runs through the heart of the country, providing farmers much needed water and making this one of the most populated regions in all of North Africa. Riverboats run for much of the rivers length here, making it an excellent way to get up close views of the surrounding villages and archeological sites. The tour wraps up with one of the most famous landmarks in world and the only remaining wonder of the ancient world - The Pyramids of Giza. These unmistakable structures were built by the rulers of ancient Egypt back in 3000 BCE - primarily as tombs for pharaohs and queens. Despite the fact that their sparkling white limestone exterior is long gone, as well as many of the surrounding structures - they've stood the test of time like few structures on the face of the planet. Be sure to visit at night - the entire complex comes to life as the pyramids are lit up - an unforgettable sight. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: West Africa" Big thanks to @_Michael, @RobertLM78, @scotttbarry, @Ceafus 88, @MushyMushy, @CorinaMarie, @Jonas_Chaves, @bobolee, @Odainsaker, @RandyE, @Manuel-ito, @mike_oxlong, @bladeberkman, @sucram17, @TMTS, @TekindusT, @Toby Ferrian, @redfox85, @metarvo, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @MAW, @Marushine, & @Golhbul for all the likes!
  4. Tour of Africa: Central Africa

    The tour resumes as we look towards one of Africa's most iconic natural wonders - the legendary Mount Kilimanjaro. Standing some 19,341 feet tall - its Africa's tallest mountain and one of its most popular climbing destinations. Despite its height, its a relatively easy climb - its essentially a big trek to the top - but what you do need to watch out for here is the very real risk of altitude sickness. While the top might not be as impressive as it once was with many of its iconic glaciers melting due to climate change - it still offers some of the most incredible views the world has to offer. From Kilimanjaro, we travel north into Kenya to witness some of Africa's most stunning wildlife. Our first stop is the incredible Masai Mara National Reserve - home to some of the best wildlife on the face of the planet. You'll find elephants, giraffes, zebras, lions, wildebeest, and countless others roaming these lands - even with declining numbers in recent years, there's still plenty here to observe and stare at in awe. The best way though to view them though is high above in a hot air balloon - despite the cost, its still certainly an experience that you won't want to miss out on. We continue north to another one of Kenya's wildlife gems - the incredible Lake Logipi. This algae-infested rift valley lake is home to countless lesser flamingos each year during migration - they make for a truly stunning sight among the many hot springs and geysers that dot the shoreline. Further north is where you'll find what some call the world's biggest swamp: the Sudd of South Sudan. The very name "Sudd" is Arabic for barrier or obstruction - and that's just what this swamp has been for thousands of years for the locals and outsiders alike. Not even the Roman Empire could get past it - Emperor Nero himself sent his troops up the White Nile, but the Sudd prevented any further colonization. These swamps have also have made the search for the source of the White Nile particularly difficult - its simply that big and difficult to navigate. Despite the nature of the swamps, the locals have lived here for thousands of years, usually setting up small huts on various islands across the swamps. Although seeing wildlife here can be rare - its still possible to see a thundering herd of elephants now and then making their way across the swamp. We begin making our way back down south through the rural landscapes of the Great Rift Valley. For as far as the eye can see, the lands here are crossed by an intricate pattern of huts and farmland, providing the locals just enough to make a living off of. Our final stop in Central Africa is another one of Africa's premier natural wonders - majestic Victoria Falls. The tribes here call it "the smoke that thunders" - which seems quite fitting as you can hear the water cascading down these sheer cliffs from miles away. At 355 feet tall, these might not be the world's tallest waterfalls - but they're certainly one of the most awe-inspiring - and a destination that anyone visiting here won't want to miss. (No photoshop used on the scene below) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: East Africa" Big thanks to @RobertLM78, @_Michael, @Toby Ferrian, @Urban Constanta, @Manuel-ito, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @nRVOUS, @RandyE, @SC4L0ver, @bobolee, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Namiko, @mattb325, @mrsmartman, @kelistmac, @matias93, @Marushine, @Jonas_Chaves, & @Akallan for all the likes!
  5. Tour of Africa: Southern Africa

    The tour of Africa continues on as we visit the rolling hillsides of southern Zimbabwe. For as far as we can see, small villages dot the landscape - and the locals have lived in mud and thatched roof huts like these for thousands of years. Small plots of farmland are seen throughout the countryside - providing the locals just enough for them and their families. As we move west, we venture through a very different kind of landscape: the swampy marshlands of the Okavango Delta. This massive inland delta is unlike any other place on earth - and the wildlife is equally incredible. You can find massive herds of elephants, wildebeest, lions, zebras, and countless other species - so we get on a boat and get as close as we can. Further west is one of Africa's natural wonders - the harsh Namib Desert. You won't find too many settlements here, as the elements are far too inhospitable - but you still might find the occasional mining village, as this region is one of the world's largest diamond exporters. The former diamond mining town of Kolmanskop in southern Namibia had an unfortunate fate - once a rich little village, the entire area was abandoned once larger deposits were found closer to the shoreline. Nature soon took over, and many of the houses here are starting to fill up with sand. While today, the entire city remains a popular tourist attraction - its unknown how long it will last until its completely lost to the Namib. We move back south into South Africa - and we're sure to visit one of the most beautiful destinations in the entire continent - the vineyards of Franschhoek. Centuries old farms complete with Dutch architecture makes this one of the most charming places we visit on our tour - and there's few ways better way to spend a weekend than going out and tasting some of the local wines. Further south is where you'll find the legislative capital of South Africa - Cape Town. With a population of nearly 4 million, this is one of the largest metropolitan areas in all of Africa - and much of the city is surrounded by townships (slums). The locals have to deal with poor housing conditions and poverty - not to mention the polluting factories that dump waste right into the surrounding rivers and streams. The defining feature of Cape Town isn't an office building or any other man made structure - but instead the stunning Table Mountain that serves as one of the world's best backdrops. Its stunning any time of the day - but when the clouds and fog start to roll over the top and into the city, there's few places that are as magical. Travel some 700 miles east along the Drakensberg Mountains and you'll uncover another one of South Africa's incredible natural wonders... Tugela Falls majestically cascades some 2,972 feet down The Amphitheater, a stunning geological feature which contains some of the world's most impressive cliff faces. To get here will require days and days of hiking - but considering its widely regarded as having some of the world's greatest views from the top - its certainly worth it. The world's second tallest waterfall certainly doesn't disappoint - and it serves as the perfect end to our tour of Southern Africa. (No photoshop used - the cliffs are a custom mod of mine which can be found here. The .gif is 12MB - might take a bit to load) Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Johannesburg" Big thanks to @NielsC007, @TMTS, @sucram17, @Akallan, @BC Canuck, @Elenphor, @mrsmartman, @SC4L0ver, @mattb325, @kschmidt, @Tonraq, @GoKingsGo, @Marushine, @kingofsimcity, @Namiko, @weixc812, @Toby Ferrian, @TekindusT, @Fantozzi, @raynev1, @nRVOUS, @bobolee, @RandyE, @Fargo, @Yarahi, @Jonas_Chaves, @Manuel-ito, @scotttbarry, @mike_oxlong, @CorinaMarie, @RobertLM78, & @_Michael for all the likes!
  6. Tour of Africa: Johannesburg

    Our Tour of Africa begins with one of Africa's most iconic cities - Johannesburg. With nearly 4 million people in its metropolitan area - this is South Africa's largest city, and has one of the best skylines in all of Africa. With a unique combination of various architecture styles and plenty of famous landmarks to boot - there's plenty to do and see here. The famous Orlando Power Station was in use for nearly 50 years - but since the late 90s, its been transformed into a tourist center, with colorful murals painted on its walls and base jumping becoming a popular activity. To make it into the city itself, one of the most traveled routes is over the Nelson Mandela Bridge - completed in 2003, its one of the most iconic landmarks in the city. Construction of the bridge was quite tricky, as it directly runs over 43 different rail lines - but construction was completed without disrupting any of them, and its been a popular tourist attraction ever since. At night, this bridge turns into a spectacle - for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the bridge's lighting system was upgraded extensively, and a new rainbow colored scheme was installed. If you can make it here at night - the striking color show will certainly be worth it. We've made it into the CBD - and there's no better time to see the city than during a beautiful South African sunset. Despite a little fog and rain - the landmarks here are still quite stunning, like the Carlton Centre. Completed in 1973, its been the tallest office building in Africa ever since. At night is when the city really begins to come alive, however. The streets of Johannesburg are typical of any other African metropolis - there's people and cars filling every last inch of pavement. It may be chaotic, but the life and energy of these streets makes visiting this city a special experience. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Introduction" Thanks to @Namiko, @GoKingsGo, @Yarahi, @Tonraq, @juliok92012, @AlexSLM520, @RandyE, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @scotttbarry, @nos.17, @mattb325, @matias93, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Marushine, @_Michael, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, & @Toby Ferrian for all the likes!
  7. Tour of Africa: Introduction

    So for my next series of updates, I have something a little special planned. Over the last couple months, I've been slowly accumulating a large collection of African scenes - and it's finally starting to come together. With nearly 40 different scenes (the pics below are just a small little teaser of what's to come - the tip of the iceberg ), it's going to be like nothing I've ever done before - an unforgettable tour of just about everything the continent has to offer. We'll start off the six-part series by taking a look at one of Africa's most iconic cities - Johannesburg. From there, we'll stay in Southern Africa, exploring a variety of natural scenes - including one of Africa's most famous wildlife sanctuaries, the Okavango Delta. Along with the world's second tallest waterfall - Tugela Falls. Animations are going to play a pivotal role in this series - it's going to be quite the sight From there, we'll head east - getting to visit East Africa and the beautiful Indian Ocean along the way. With a number of unique wonders like the Tsingy stone forests - visiting Madagascar is also must. It's off to Central Africa from there - where we'll get to explore wild Africa at its finest along with a number of natural wonders. Algae-rich lakes such as Lake Logipi attract countless lesser flamingos - and when they migrate, it makes for one of the greatest sights on the continent. We'll then head out to West Africa - visiting a number of small rural scenes, like the ones found in Rural Congo. And we'll wrap up in North Africa - after traveling through the Sahara, we'll get to see one of the continents greatest landmarks, the Pyramids. Additionally, as you might expect - there hasn't been a great deal of African themed custom content to work with. Because of this, custom content creation has been absolutely vital to this series. I've been creating various BATs from scratch on a massive scale to make some of these scenes possible: WIP: If anyone's interested in some of the stuff I'll be using over the next couple of updates, feel free to PM me. I don't know yet though how long it will take me to upload some of this stuff, there's still lots of various odds and ends that I need to sort out and I've been extremely busy with my CJ/MD as of late. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Bohemia" @Jeffrey500 Thanks! Bohemia is certainly one of my dream destinations Might be a while though before I find the time to upload this stuff so feel free to PM me if you're interested in anything. @mike_oxlong Thanks I've been slowly accumulating a whole bunch of pics really since the beginning of the year and I'm finally finding the time to put them all into proper updates. @dabadon5 Thank you for the comment! @Simmer2 @_Michael Thanks for the kind words! @JP Schriefer Thanks for the comment! @tariely Thanks! I had to do a lot of fiddling around in 3dsmax to make sure the models were just perfect, glad you liked it @raynev1 Thanks raynev! @Akallan Thank you! When I first saw that village I knew I wanted to do the update. It's so magical! @RandyE Thanks for the comment! I was thinking the same exact same thing when I was working on those. I actually got started on a Yosemite update a real long time ago (late May of last year I think? Never made much progress on it though.) and whipped up a really fancy national park themed banner like the ones you mentioned. Perhaps I'll have to give a couple US national parks another go in the future @TekindusT Thank you! @jmsepe Thanks for the nice words! @kschmidt Thanks for the comment! Those houses were actually just released on the LEX, check them out here @Namiko Thank you, glad you liked the animation I've been trying to work more of those in to my updates here recently. And big thanks to @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Jeffrey500, @mike_oxlong, @Tyberius06, @Simmer2, @matias93, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, @CorinaMarie, @_Michael, @RandyE, @JP Schriefer, @SC4L0ver, @Marushine, @huzman, @Manuel-ito, @raynev1, @Akallan, @nos.17, @MushyMushy, @mrsmartman, @AlexSLM520, @Silur, @kschmidt, @juliok92012, @Elenphor, @Yarahi, & @Namiko for all the likes!
  8. Carlton Center

    Version 1.0.0

    1,659 Downloads

    The Carlton Centre is a skyscraper and shopping centre located in downtown Johannesburg, South Africa. At 223 metres (732 ft), it has been the tallest office building in Africa since 1973. The Carlton Centre has 50 floors. The foundations of the two buildings in the complex are 5 m (16 ft) in diameter and extend 15 m (49 ft) down to the bedrock, 35 m (115 ft) below street level. The building houses both offices and shops, and has over 46 per cent of the floor area below ground level. The Carlton Centre is linked to the Carlton Hotel by a below-ground shopping centre with over 180 shops. This file Includes: Functional Landmark with 5,000 CO$$$ Jobs To install: Unzip the folder inside and dragg it on C:\Program Files\Maxis\SimCity 4 Deluxe\Plugins.
  9. Carlton Hotel Johannesburg

    Version 1.0.0

    1,479 Downloads

    The Carlton Hotel is a historic hotel in the Central Business District of Johannesburg, South Africa. It opened in 1972 as part of the enormous Carlton Centre complex, and has been closed since 1998. The enormous, modern Carlton Centre, built at a cost of R88 million, would contain a fifty-story office tower, the tallest in Africa; the thirty-story luxury Carlton Hotel; a five-story Garlicks department store; a huge three-and-a-half-acre public plaza with a two-story underground shopping centre beneath it containing 140 shops; parking garages with space for 2000 cars; and an adjacent 57,000 square-foot exhibition centre with an indoor ice skating rink on the top level. The complex was designed by noted American architect Gordon Bunshaft, of the internationally renowned firm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, working in conjunction with the local Johannesburg firm of Rhodes-Harrison Hoffe and Partners. Anglo American bought out SAB's share of the project in 1969, while it was still under construction. This file Includes: Functional Landmark with 2,500 CS$$$ Jobs To install: Unzip the folder inside and dragg it on C:\Program Files\Maxis\SimCity 4 Deluxe\Plugins
  10. Traffic Jam In Africa

    From the album Hall of Fame

    1st Place entry from Thrilling Traffic (S3-09-W) Weekly 45 Rep 25 Bonus Points 43 TOTAL Points Challenge Results Data | Leaderboard Rankings There's plenty of crowded streets across the globe, but not many get as busy as those of Africa. From the crowded streets of Nairobi, Kinshasa, and Lagos in this case, just about every major African city is constantly buzzing with thousands of people and cars, and the ongoing flow of activity never seems to cease. Street vendors and hawkers add to the traffic even more, and once you get stuck in traffic it can take an hour just to travel a couple of blocks. As you can see in this picture as well, markets will occasionally spill over into the streets, blocking off important travel routes and causing the congestion to intensify. In order for most people to just make it across town, the yellow 'danfos' (buses) that you see everywhere are a vital part of city life - but they in turn cause the traffic to worsen even more, so much so that they were actually recently banned in various places across the city.

    © 2016 korver

  11. Scenes From Africa

    Our trip to Africa starts off in Lagos, Africa's largest city. Getting anywhere around town seems to be an impossible task with the never ending flow of traffic. Street vendors and hawkers are on every street corner, and the massive crowds of people everywhere adds to the congestion. In order to go anywhere, using the bright yellow danfos (buses) are almost a necessity - they're virtually everywhere in the city. But just when we thought the traffic was bad enough around our hotel - one of the local markets spills out onto the streets. This in turn forces one of the main roads to shut down and everything comes to a complete standstill for a couple of days. We're limited to touring the city by foot at this point, but at least we get to check out many of the beautiful goods that the local markets have to offer. After our stay in Lagos, we start traveling East - right into the heart of Congo. All the roads from this point forward are dirt covered - which potentially makes rainy season a real headache. Fortunately for us, we don't run into any problems for the time being. Along our way, we get to meet numerous tribes, observing their rituals and getting a chance to see how the locals live. The mud and thatched roof huts they call home have been a mainstay for thousands of years - and we can see why, noting their sturdiness and ease of build. Our next stop in our African journey is northern Tanzania where we take our Jeep through Serengeti National Park. The views from the ground are amazing, almost immediately spotting large herds of elephants, giraffes, and zebras. However, to get an even better view, we decide to board a hot air balloon instead. It's wildebeest migration season, and we get an excellent birds-eye view from our balloon - also finally spotting a couple of lions on the prowl as well. Once we get back on the ground, we finally start to make our way out of the park - but not before stopping a few times to let a herd of Giraffes make their way across the road. We board our plane and arrive next in Madagascar, being sure to see it's famous Avenue of the Baobabs. Not only are they perhaps the world's fattest tree, but they also can live for 2,000 years or more - they're truly marvelous as they tower high above us. However, just as we make our way out of the area, we're met with an unexpected surprise. We thought we left the traffic back in Lagos - but evidently we were quite wrong, getting stuck in a cattle traffic jam on numerous occasions. Once we make it back to the mainland, we travel a couple hundred miles West and make our way across the Zimbabwean border. After getting lost more than a couple times and finally getting some much needed help from the locals, we're able to locate Great Zimbabwe, nestled in the middle of the Zimbabwean foothills. Once the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe, all that's left is a collection of ruins scattered around central and western Africa. Despite their current state, you can still get a sense of the power and greatness that these walls once held. Our final destination is perhaps Africa's most famous - Victoria Falls. One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, these awe-inspiring falls truly live up to the title. Once we get there, we're sure to try out a little whitewater river rafting - it's the middle of the high season and the river is in full force. However, there's still something that's a little more dangerous that we have to try out. Our tour guide takes us back up to the top of the falls, and we board a small boat to Livingstone Island near the middle of the Zambezi river. We slowly move our way across the lip of the falls, careful not to take one wrong step on any slippery rocks along our way. Finally, we reach our destination - the infamous Devil's pool. We take the plunge, and the only thing protecting us from a 300+ foot drop is a small submerged rock barrier on the edge. We take a deep breath, carefully leaning over the edge to catch the view of a lifetime. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! Thanks -korver
  12. Traffic Jam In Africa

    From the album Thrilling Traffic (S3-09-W)

    Please view it in full resolution to see all the custom lotting and MMPing before you cast your vote! A scene from an upcoming update for my CJ, True Earth. There's plenty of crowded streets across the globe, but not many get as busy as those of Africa. From the crowded streets of Nairobi, Kinshasa, and Lagos in this case, just about every major African city is constantly buzzing with thousands of people and cars, and the ongoing flow of activity never seems to cease. Street vendors and hawkers add to the traffic even more, and once you get stuck in traffic it can take an hour just to travel a couple of blocks. As you can see in this picture as well, markets will occasionally spill over into the streets, blocking off important travel routes and causing the congestion to intensify. In order for most people to just make it across town, the yellow 'danfos' (buses) that you see everywhere are a vital part of city life - but they in turn cause the traffic to worsen even more, so much so that they were actually recently banned in various places across the city.
  13. Journey Through The Sahara

    Our next stop takes us to the famous Sahara Desert - the world's largest hot desert. For thousands of years, nomads have adapted to the harsh terrain, with an extensive knowledge of the terrain being absolutely vital to their survival. Knowing exactly where each and every oasis is located is perhaps the single most important aspect to this, and we approach our first one in the Ennedi Plateau of Chad. Guelta d'Archei is perhaps the Sahara's most famous oasis, and has been used since prehistoric times, note the cave paintings on the walls. The water's distinctive black hue - caused by untold amounts of camel dung over the years - hides the lake's most dangerous species quite well, the Nile crocodile. Hopping from oasis to oasis is crucial for anyone traveling in the Sahara, and fortunately we're able to find another one just in time. The small town of Bardaï, Chad, has been an important trading post in the region for centuries. Unfortunately, droughts have ravished the landscape and the riverbed is almost completely bare. There's just enough water left over for the camels. After a month-long northern excursion in search of pastures, the caravan finally starts to head back south through the mighty Grand Erg Occidental, but not before they come face to face with one of the Sahara's greatest dangers. An enormous sandstorm engulfs the caravan, and rages on for nearly an entire day. Fortunately, by sitting to the side of their camels, they're able to lessen the blow and eventually get back on their feet. After nearly a month more of traveling, we finally reach our end destination of Djenné, Mali. Every Monday, the entire region takes part in market day - truly a sight to behold. Just under the shadow of the magnificent Great Mosque, the streets come alive with countless shoppers and market vendors, giving them the much needed opportunity to trade camels or goods. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  14. Maio, Cape Verde

    Version 1.0.0

    829 Downloads

    Maio is the easternmost of the Sotavento islands of Cape Verde. Maio is located south of the island of Boa Vistaand east of Santiago. The island is known for its sandy beaches and large forest, which is unusual for Cape Verde. This map is nowhere near as challenging as my Jan Mayen map, however, just as much work went into it. This map has an incoming/outcoming railroad connection, as-well as some left-over mining railroads in the mountainous area. One mini-mountain range has a small railroad bridge, used to connect the two ore-filled hills together (not present IRL). Tropical theme, right-hand drive.
  15. Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    Located in the middle of the Great Rift Valley, Lake Bogoria is home to one of the world's largest populations of lesser flamingos - every year millions of them migrate to it's algae infested waters. The lake boasts some of the most impressive wildlife in all of Africa - hundreds of species of birds call the lake home, and you might even see a couple zebras if you look hard enough. Geysers and hot springs dot the shoreline, creating a truly unforgettable landscape. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  16. Port of Mayumba Tour

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2dCkWDcrq7s Port of Mayumba Tour Hello, hello, Welcome to Nyanga! I hope you enjoy your stay here and make sure to visit all the wonderful sites to experience what Nyanga has to offer! Today we will be looking at the old port of Mayumba. At this location the original European Settlers came and met with the tribesmen of Nyanga, and so began the arduous journey which makes what Mayumba is today. The port is a thriving hub of markets, industry and crime, so lock the car doors and put up the windows... Fruit and vegetables are being unloaded and sorted, to be ready for shipping, some of it ends up on the street markets or in local shops. Trucks also stop here for rest stops or a tire change. Some factories are located here as well, such as D'acton's chemical production facility (the factory lot in the centre) and Patriot Protective's workshop (on the left). Some of buildings here have been around since colonial times, where sugar was processed from the plantations. There are also some warehouse depots throughout the port, where storage facilities and smaller factories are located One of the busiest freight terminals is the bulk freight dock, everything from food, to chemicals and clothes is shipped out from here. The boats though are small and mostly head north to neighbouring Gabon, some go to Nigeria, Ivory Coast and Equatorial Guinea. Here are the grain processing docks. Wheat, maize and hops and brought here by truck for processing and then shipped all over the world. These mills are owned and operated by the government, but have been infamously known for the poor conditions and terrible quality housing provided for the workers. The coal docks take up the majority of large shipping traffic in Mayumba. They also take up the most space in the port, by having a massive coal storage yard. In some effort to provide housing for the workers employed at the port the government built council houses and flats. Sadly they were poorly constructed and not properly mainitained, today they are riddled with crime and are in very bad need of re-development, but many workers have no other choice and have to live here to keep their families alive. Our last visit for the day is to one of the many very busy street markets at the Portside Townships. These usually occur all through the week and many stalls and shops continue selling right through the night. You can get everything you could ever think of at these markets, much of the stuff like food and some clothes are not terribly bad quality, but stay away from any electronics or branded clothing, these are almost always fakes and a waste of money! You also have to watch you pockets, pick pocketing is a frequent occurance in any city around here. We're back at the hotel, I hope you enjoyed your day out! Thanks guys for the comments on my last post! They are much appreciated!!
  17. Health officials trying to combat Ebola in western Africa now have a new problem; deadly violence from people suspicious of officials in the first place. A health team trying to raise awareness of the disease had been murdered by a mob using machetes and clubs in a village in Guinea. I have heard that other health teams have been chased off by armed mobs elsewhere in that part of Africa. The people there, after generations of wars and government repression, are distrustful of any officials, and many are believing conspiracy theories about the disease, among which that Ebola is being used as a biological weapon against them. http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-29256443
  18. Version 1

    17,093 Downloads

    Before going any further about the description of this BAT this is DmScopio's BAT it hasn't been released here, so I Emailed DmScopio and I was authorized to upload here, this BAT along with others. Overview First National Bank Stadium or simply FNB Stadium, also known as Soccer City and The Calabash, is a stadium located in Nasrec, the Soweto area of Johannesburg, South Africa. It is located next to the South African Football Association headquarters (SAFA House) where both the FIFA offices and the Local Organising Committee for the 2010 FIFA World Cup were housed.[2] Designed as the main association football stadium for the World Cup, the FNB Stadium became the largest stadium in Africa with a capacity of 94,736. However its maximum capacity during the 2010 FIFA World Cup was 84,490 due to reserved seating for the press and other VIPs. The stadium is also known by its nickname "The Calabash" due to its resemblance to the African pot[3] or gourd. It was the site of Nelson Mandela's first speech in Johannesburg after his release from prison. It was also the site of Chris Hani's funeral. It was also the venue for the 2010 FIFA World Cup Final, which was played by the Netherlands and Spain. Statistics Lot size : 18 x 18 Cost : Free Will be found in the landmarks menu dependencies BSC Textures Vol1 - http://sc4devotion.com/csxlex/lex_filedesc.php?lotGET=90 Do's and don't! Do enjoy this wonderful BAT! Do credit DmScopio, it's his amazing work 8) Don't upload to other sites without his authorization
  19. Dangerous Waters

    West African Piracy exceeds the Somali coast. Mostly oil tankers. Who is surprised, and with a co-operative Nigerian government. Time for more joint navy patrols. This is getting more and more like the Barbary Coast of the 19th century. There is only one place for a pirate. Hanging from a yardarm. Courts are too slow, and if these guys are caught in the act, should they be run up on a yardarm (or other convenient spar such as a crane)?
  20. Adeline

    Replies Fox- I still am... A year later I'm still building my cities with care ;-) Ace<3 - Thank you! Schulmanator- Thanks :-D _____________________________________________________________________ NOTES Hello everyone, It's been well over a year since I've posted and I've been away for quite a bit working on my collegiate pursuits as well as attempting to keep a great GPA.I am now a junior at college and I just celebrated my 20th birthday. In addition I've been on Simtropolis for six great years and it's been great. Now, I'm not going to say it's the end, but I am trying my best to keep connected with everyone of you. So I'm going to post while I can and try to make some beautiful work for you guys to enjoy! :-) Thanks everyone! _____________________________________________________________________ A | DE | LINE Adeline is a mid-sized city that was developed throughout the 1920's into the 1960's. The population of the city hovers around 89,000 and has developed into the one of the most densely populated cities in the country due to it's compact size. The city has one of the average incomes per household and while the city has become a shining beacon of a commuter city it has been left in-between an era of urbanization and a residential paradise. Downtown Adeline is a product of the construction boom of the 1960's. Many of the buildings here are rather small in footprint size and concrete clad. Sandstone streets were preserved from the original era of it being a small railroad town which was incorporated in 1877. The city center's plaza has not changed much since the 1960's and Adeline was spared from the blight of the 1970's. Ebausi Hill is a residential neighborhood that is immediately east of the rail station. The development of the area happened in two spurts between 1929-1938 and 1959-1967. In between those two points, there were very few buildings built. After that point, construction began in the area again during the late 1990's. Rents for apartments here are relatively cheap and most young professionals stay in this neighborhood. Mondégast Hotel is the first hotel built along the Central Avance Railway in the early 1910's. It was the first hotel of it's kind servicing many famous people during it's time. Inside the hotel, there is a 2 floor suite that is dedicated to being used by the royal family. The view of the railway from the hotel became blocked in 1998 when a noise barrier was put in place against the railway to reduce the effects of noise pollution in the area. South Adeline was developed mainly during the 1960's. The older and derelict housing was torn down in the late 1990's to make room for newer wall-to-wall apartments and a high rise that helped to raise property values. Due to the small core of the city, many homes outside of .75 miles of the CBD are single family homes. Many of these homes are products of 1950s and 1960's construction. Cîva is located southwest of the city center and is home to larger single family homes. Most of these homes usually run for 240,000 SDL (403,200 USD) on average. There is also a house owned by the prime minister Marianne Delsa which is in this area. Gaumont Mall opened in 2008 as a premier retail outlet in the area. It's construction marked a new era of development that would help bring this small sized city into a more modern age. Even though it is not Adeline on a map, the Township of Prassienetta is administrated by the city of Adeline. Prassienetta lies north of the city center is bounded by the Sylie Highway to the south and the suburb of Rhyeswhile to the north. Prassienetta does not have it's own school, fire department, police department, and it is serviced by the Adeline Bus System. _________________________ EMH2013 ©
  21. Slum set

    Version

    4,308 Downloads

    Its slum mainly from Africa or South America (favelas). Buildings didnt need water. Growable. Size: 1x1 most buildings or 2x2 several. Dependencies: LBT Mega Prop Pack v.01 LBT Mega Texture Pack v.02 BSC Textures Vol 02 BSC Textures Vol 03 BSC Mega Props - JES Vol01 BSC MEGA Props - SG Vol 01
  22. Welcome to Burj Khalifa Proyect: Hellow all, you know me, because i maked the Nakheel Tower Crappy version xD, Actually i don't have updates, not yet, but is comming soon, officialy. this is the next proyect after make of burj khalifa Sky City (China): The next tallest building in the world in 87 Days. Nakheel Tower V2 Kingdom Centre But to test i have to repair the error of The game ( will run with the software driver when next launched)
  23. Antananarivo, capital of Madagascar

    Version

    291 Downloads

    G'Day Simtropians, Today I wish to present a map requested courtesy of EugeneLavery, thanks mate. Antananarivo is the the largest city and capital of Madagascar and was formally known as Tananarive. See me up CLOSE and personal. This is a real world map and was produced with dem and satellite data. It measures 53.248km x 57.344km and is in .sc4m format. Wouanagaine's mepper or terraformer is required to import it into SC4. it is terrain and scale accurate. A readme is included free, it contains instructions and links. That's all I think. Cheers
  24. Version

    134 Downloads

    G'Day Simtropians, Today's map I wish to present was courtesy of a request by VT_Railroad_Guy here at Simtrop, thanks mate. Jo'burg is the largest city in South Africa and is the largest city in the world not built on a river, lake or the coast. She is located on the Highveld at and elevation of 1753m. See me up CLOSE and personal. Yhis is a real world map and was created with dem data. It is in .SC4M format and requires Wouanagaine's mapper to import it into the game. The map is terrain and scale accurate. A readme is incuded for free containing instructions and links. That's it I think. Happy New Year Cheers
  25. A Dictators Daydream, Tripoli.

    Version

    232 Downloads

    G'Day Simtropians, Today I am presenting a map requested Courtesy of Eugenelavery, Thanks mate. Tripoli is the capital of Libya and dates back to antiquity when in the 7th century BC the Phoenicians founded a city there. See me up CLOSE and personal. This real world map was produced with dem and satellite and measures 53.248km x 45.056km. Utilising 16bit technology and in .SC4M format one requires Wouanagaine's mapper or terraformer to import it into one's game. It is terrain and scale accurate. Links and instructions are in the readme. It's free. That's all I think. Cheers
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