Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 06/01/2015 in all areas

  1. 71 points

    Version Version 36

    336,322 Downloads

    The Network Addon Mod (NAM) combines all transportation network-related fixes, additions and new creations that have been released so far. It will add countless new features to the existing network tools, such as new overpasses, highway onramps, intersections, ped-malls, a ground light rail network, roundabouts and turning lanes. This is the Windows version of the Network Addon Mod, featuring an installer. A Mac version is available here. NOTE: The file is available directly on the STEX once more, thanks to the benevolent Dirktator! ModDB also remains available as a registration-free mirror, which can also be accessed here. Installing over previous versions: If you already have a version of the NAM installed, NAM 36 should be installed directly over top of any previous NAM releases, to ensure that your previous installation options are retained. A clean install is not recommended, unless you do not already have a version of the NAM installed. For more information, see here. Tech Support: Since NAM 36 is now the most recent release, technical support for NAM 35 and earlier is no longer available. Special Thanks: The NAM Team would like to extend its sincere thanks to all the members of the community for their continued support over the past 13 1/2 years the mod has existed.
  2. 59 points
    korver

    Myrtos Beach

    Located on the island of Cephalonia in the Ionian Sea, few beaches across the globe can compare to Greece's breathtaking Myrtos Beach. Due to it's remote and rugged location, the beach is completely inaccessible by foot - the only way to reach it is to traverse your way down a series of steep hairpin curves. Once you make it there however, you'll be rewarded greatly with pristine, warm Mediterranean waters, perfectly soft white sand, and of course, incredible views. Our journey gets started off with us making accommodations at a timeless Greek villa - our room overlooks the edge of the beach, giving us a fantastic view of the sunset. We'll be staying here tonight, and tomorrow we're off to the beach. We set off for the beach early in the morning, driving through endless fields of daisies and poppies along our way. However, just as we roll down our windows to take in the smell, the clouds darken and it starts pouring. It looks like our day at the beach could very well be in jeopardy. Fortunately for us however, it was nothing more than a quick rain shower. The sky eventually begins to clear up and the beach starts to come alive with tourists. We stake out a prime spot on the beachfront and soak up the sun - no better way to spend an afternoon! Myrtos Beach is more than just a beach - it's an experience. Activities such as hang gliding are extremely popular throughout the area, so we throw caution to the wind and decide to give it a shot. We make our way back to the beach just as the day begins to wind down. Once nightfall approaches, we get a little peace and quiet once the beach starts emptying out - being sure to take it all in one last time. A perfect end to our day. I hope you enjoyed your visit to Myrtos Beach! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  3. 56 points
    korver

    Scenes From Africa

    Our trip to Africa starts off in Lagos, Africa's largest city. Getting anywhere around town seems to be an impossible task with the never ending flow of traffic. Street vendors and hawkers are on every street corner, and the massive crowds of people everywhere adds to the congestion. In order to go anywhere, using the bright yellow danfos (buses) are almost a necessity - they're virtually everywhere in the city. But just when we thought the traffic was bad enough around our hotel - one of the local markets spills out onto the streets. This in turn forces one of the main roads to shut down and everything comes to a complete standstill for a couple of days. We're limited to touring the city by foot at this point, but at least we get to check out many of the beautiful goods that the local markets have to offer. After our stay in Lagos, we start traveling East - right into the heart of Congo. All the roads from this point forward are dirt covered - which potentially makes rainy season a real headache. Fortunately for us, we don't run into any problems for the time being. Along our way, we get to meet numerous tribes, observing their rituals and getting a chance to see how the locals live. The mud and thatched roof huts they call home have been a mainstay for thousands of years - and we can see why, noting their sturdiness and ease of build. Our next stop in our African journey is northern Tanzania where we take our Jeep through Serengeti National Park. The views from the ground are amazing, almost immediately spotting large herds of elephants, giraffes, and zebras. However, to get an even better view, we decide to board a hot air balloon instead. It's wildebeest migration season, and we get an excellent birds-eye view from our balloon - also finally spotting a couple of lions on the prowl as well. Once we get back on the ground, we finally start to make our way out of the park - but not before stopping a few times to let a herd of Giraffes make their way across the road. We board our plane and arrive next in Madagascar, being sure to see it's famous Avenue of the Baobabs. Not only are they perhaps the world's fattest tree, but they also can live for 2,000 years or more - they're truly marvelous as they tower high above us. However, just as we make our way out of the area, we're met with an unexpected surprise. We thought we left the traffic back in Lagos - but evidently we were quite wrong, getting stuck in a cattle traffic jam on numerous occasions. Once we make it back to the mainland, we travel a couple hundred miles West and make our way across the Zimbabwean border. After getting lost more than a couple times and finally getting some much needed help from the locals, we're able to locate Great Zimbabwe, nestled in the middle of the Zimbabwean foothills. Once the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe, all that's left is a collection of ruins scattered around central and western Africa. Despite their current state, you can still get a sense of the power and greatness that these walls once held. Our final destination is perhaps Africa's most famous - Victoria Falls. One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, these awe-inspiring falls truly live up to the title. Once we get there, we're sure to try out a little whitewater river rafting - it's the middle of the high season and the river is in full force. However, there's still something that's a little more dangerous that we have to try out. Our tour guide takes us back up to the top of the falls, and we board a small boat to Livingstone Island near the middle of the Zambezi river. We slowly move our way across the lip of the falls, careful not to take one wrong step on any slippery rocks along our way. Finally, we reach our destination - the infamous Devil's pool. We take the plunge, and the only thing protecting us from a 300+ foot drop is a small submerged rock barrier on the edge. We take a deep breath, carefully leaning over the edge to catch the view of a lifetime. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! Thanks -korver
  4. 55 points
    JP Schriefer

    Tribute to A Nonny Moose

    I do not know a good way to say it then I will be very direct. After all this time we need to get used to not see our dear @A Nonny Moose here again. He passed away on September 28. http://www.haskettfh.com/winterton-john-hensall/ That last time he came here I think we all feel relieved, but I found it strange he appeared to say nothing and didn't return again. It could be himself making a last visit or a family member arranging something. Today I decided to look for something again and came across the bad news. What remains from now to us is to have good memories of John and his incredible help on Simtropolis. No doubt he is an icon. I'll never forget your help several times both in the forum and private messages, just like your daily posts entertaining and informing us. Rest in Peace, buddy.
  5. 51 points
    korver

    South America + Bonus Pictures

    After visiting the world's tallest waterfall and largest rain forest, our small Cessna finally lands at our next destination. We've got quite the trip planned, so enjoy Our first stop in our journey is the capital and largest city of Suriname, Paramaribo. It's truly a one of a kind city, with its mixture of beautiful colonial Dutch architecture on the edge of the rain forest. The Dutch architecture serves as a reminder to the past - the country was under Dutch rule for nearly 150 years as Dutch Guiana until it gained its independence back in 1975. Our time in Paramaribo is brief - and unfortunately, the rain never seems to stop during our stay, as is common in much of the country. We board our plane once again and head back out. Cloaked in heavy rain clouds, Mount Roraima on the Brazil/Venezuela/Guyana border is truly breathtaking with its imposing sheer cliffs. Countless waterfalls plunge off of its tiered slopes - yet another sign that we're in the middle of rainy season. We land our plane just inside the Amazonas state of Eastern Venezuela for a quick excursion. We're up for a challenge, and the imposing Autana Tepui provides just that. After a couple of days of nerve wracking climbing, we finally reach the top and put up our tents for the night, taking in the view. We get back on our plane and land a couple hundred miles north in Valencia. We'll be traveling by car for now on, and the first stop is the small town of Puerto Colombia on the southern coast of the Caribbean Sea. It's a charming little village, with its small river filled with brightly colored riverboats. No trip here would be complete without taking one for a cruise through the village, and we do just that. After driving along the Caribbean coast for a couple hundred more miles, we finally make our way to the Pan-American highway. Taking that south, we travel high through the Andes mountains of Colombia for quite some time until we finally reach Colombia's Cocora Valley. This place seems almost unreal, with it's famed wax palm trees climbing to heights of up to 200 feet tall. The surrounding landscape is equally impressive, with quaint farming villages surrounded by rolling hillsides and steep, rocky slopes. The locals are quite hospitable, letting us stay the night. Not too far from the Cocora Valley is another one of Colombia's famous attractions, the Las Lajas Sanctuary. Built between 1916 and 1949, this church is one of the most impressive sights in all of South America, standing high above the steep Guáitara River canyon. Between the location, waterfalls, and reports to this day of "mysterious healing" - it's truly a magical place. After driving for seemingly an eternity through nothing but the barren deserts of Central and Southern Peru, we eventually reach a sight worth looking for. There's one landmark here that you'll want to keep your eye out for - they're easy to miss. Eventually we find one of the legendary Nazca lines - the condor. Created between 500 B.C. and A.D. 500, the Nazca culture created these lines by removing the rocks from the desert floor, revealing the lighter colored ground beneath. The best way to view these lines is by air however, so we catch a quick ride and do just that. After checking out the famed Nazca lines, we start to head our way inland towards Cuzco and finally make our way towards the legendary Machu Picchu. There's no more roads from this point forward - the only way to the top is by foot. After stopping at a local village, we get out our backpacking gear and get ready for the adventure ahead of us. It's quite the climb up the mountain, but after numerous days and nights traversing through dense rain forest, finally seeing these majestic ruins makes it all worth it. We get back on the highway and start heading south once more. The landscape initially is barren - but eventually it turns into something much more beautiful. The steep slopes of the Andes mountains have been terraced by local farmers for thousands of years, and there's no better example of their work than the Colca Canyon. Through advanced irrigation strategies they transformed these steep mountainsides into workable farmland, and to this day the locals make their living off them. Our trip through the Andes slowly gets higher and higher in elevation as we start heading eastwards. Eventually it becomes hard to just catch out breath, but we soon adapt to the massive height difference. Perched in the middle of these mountains is the world's highest lake, Lake Titicaca, a sight that we wouldn't want to miss. One of the most remarkable sights here is the floating islands of the local Uros people. By taking the tough reeds that surround the lake (totora) - they've managed to build floating islands that entire families can live on. They allow us to have a glimpse into their daily lives, allowing us onto one of their island and to observe some of their ancient traditions. We're finally out of the mountains, but the adventure as just begun for us. This swampy, densely forested area of Brazil is known as The Pantanal - and there's only one way through it, the transpantaneira. The road acts as the only safe route through the wetlands, and we run into numerous herds of cattle on the road along the way. It doesn't take long for us to get into our first standoff - as a couple of crocodile-resembling caimans need to make their way across the road. We finally reach the capital of Brazil, Brasília. Seeking a more centrally located capital, in 1960 the capital was changed from Rio de Janeiro to Brasília and an entire city was planned and built from the ground up. Architect Oscar Niemeyer designed many of the important buildings here, giving them a distinctive flair. There's no better example than the Palácio do Planalto - the official workplace of the President of Brazil truly comes alive at night. From Brasília, we start traveling eastwards towards the Brazilian coastline. Every Brazilian beach side city is magnificent, but Rio stands out from the rest. Standing atop of Corcovado Mountain is the famous Cristo Redentor statue - a must visit for any tourist, especially at sunrise. Completed in 1931, its arms were placed in an open stance, symbolizing peace. A couple hundred miles west is another Brazilian beach side city that you don't want to miss, Santos - one of the most beautiful cities that we encounter during our journey. It's gardens (the world's longest) and beaches are truly magnificent, stretching for as far as the eye can see. After all the traveling we've done thus far - some time spent relaxing on the beach is more than overdue. When traveling through Brazil, you're bound to run into a number of favelas (slums) on the outskirts of many of the larger cities. We saw a number of them in Rio de Janeiro - and as we travel through São Paulo, we see quite a few more. The people here make the most of their situation, gathering whatever they can find in order to create a house for their families. We begin the final leg of our journey with the mighty Itaipu Dam, located on the Paraná River on the Paraguay/Brazil border. You truly can't underestimate the size of this massive structure - it's the largest hydroelectric scheme in the world. This dam alone provides nearly 80% of Paraguay's electricity, as well as much of the power to many important cities in Brazil - but it did come at a steep $20 billion cost. It's the rainy season - so we get to see an up close view of the spillway in action, which drains out any excess water from the Itaipu reservoir. Our next stop is some 20 miles south - the world famous Iguazu Falls. From miles around you can hear them rumbling - you can just sense the power of these falls. There's a seemingly infinite amount of waterfalls here, and the best way to experience them is to get up close. One way is to board one of the many boats that travel along the lower river - and we do just that, getting as close to the falls as possible. But no trip is complete without visiting the "Devil's Throat" (seen in the top left corner of the picture) - an elevated walkway takes us as close as we can possibly get to it, witnessing a one of a kind wonder. Finally, our journey wraps up when we reach one of the premier destinations in South America - Buenos Aires. Once you see the avenues and architecture, it's not hard to see why it's called the "Paris of South America". 9 de Julio isn't just wide - it's the world's largest avenue - and right in the middle of it is the famous Obelisco de Buenos Aires. Built to commemorate the founding of the city in 1536, it's truly amazing at night. - Bonus Pictures - Everything else that didn't make it into an update this year, so here's their final destination. Enjoy! Yaounde, Cameroon Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania Agbokim Waterfalls, Nigeria Ancient City of Djado (1000 A.D.), Niger Rubber Farm, Liberia Mother and Child Balancing Rocks, Matobo National Park, Zimbabwe Great Blue Hole, Belize Sutherland Falls, New Zealand Great Wall of China Prague's Christmas Market New Year's Eve in Prague - Tutorials - Itaipu Dam Itaipu Dam was one of the more difficult projects I did, and after many trials and tribulations I was able to successfully get it into the game. To make it, I first downloaded the pieces from here, here, and here. After I brought it into 3dsmax, the next objective was to break it up into small pieces so it would render properly. This picture illustrated what exactly I ended up doing. Next, the pieces had to be edited with the Reader to make their occupant sizes 1x1x1, so other things such as MMPs could be plopped around them, and most importantly so they would fit onto 1x1 tiles. Then, all the pieces were put onto 1x1 tiles, and moved around countless times to ensure they would line up as close as the game would possibly allow. Finally, it was a matter of placing everything in the game and plopping water and MMPs around the entire dam structure. Some minor editing was done after the fact, such as to add extra steam on the spillway in addition to the plopped JENX small + medium waterfall lots, to add power lines between the plopped power poles, and to clean up any small imperfections between pieces. Machu Picchu Now, I'll probably get some questions on my Machu Picchu so I'll try my best to explain my method here as well. I've struggled with terraces in the past (that's why you haven't seen any so far ), but now with this method, you'll probably see things like terraced rice paddies in the future as well. So pretty much what I did was firstly download a couple of Machu Picchu models I found off of 3d warehouse. They're actually pretty easy to make though, so I'd recommend that if you can do it. I took the good elements of each, moved things around, rescaled, rotated etc and combined them to make a really nice model. Retextured it, then converted it to an editable poly, selected faces, and carefully selected and removed all the flat grass faces on the model. Cut out a section of it, rendered it, made the LODs 1x1x1 in reader, and placed it on a 1x1 lot. Opened up Model tweaker, then offset it something like 500 ft so now it's hanging way off the lot and the 1x1 lot won't interfere when I'm terraforming. Once in game, I plop it, terraform hills to the contour of the terraces, and put down lots of MMP grass where the grass used to be on the model. This picture should help illustrate that a bit (taken right at the beginning, so terraforming/MMPing wasn't done, but hopefully you should get the idea). Finally, the last adjustments were made in PS, the biggest of which included adding shadows (which is important here because models won't cast shadows on MMPs) Base Textures A couple of the city streets were MMPed, but the rest were not - and they're not actually traditional "base textures", like the ones you would expect to find in lot editor. Instead, I'll prepare a large, highly customized texture for each city scene I'm working on based on a number of pictures. Once it's done, it's placed on a big flat plane in 3dsmax and rendered, ready to be placed in game. It takes way longer than simply using modular road sets (usually a day or two) - but the increased realism is worth it, and I'll probably be using it fully moving forward. - - - Special thanks once again to all the various creators on 3d warehouse for providing invaluable models for this update. Attribution for the pictures: Waterkant Paramaribo, CCSA3, Forrestjunky | Tepuy Autana (Kuaymayojo), CCSA3, Fernando Flores | View from Mt. Roraima "Window", CCSA2, Paulo Fassina | puerto colombia (choroní, venezuela), CC2, Olga Berrios | Ceroxylon Quindiuense Cocora, CC3, Diegotorquemada | Santuario Nacional de Las Lajas 02, CCSA3, GameOfLight | Colca Canton Puno, CCSA2, world-wide-gifts.com | Machu Picchu, Peru, Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike2.0, Pedro Szekely | Nazca Lines - Condor, CCSA2, Paul Williams | Uros Islands in Lake Titicaca - panoramio, CC3, Frans-Banja Mulder | Por do Sol Pantanal em Mato Grosso Brasil, CCSA3, Filipefrazao | Yellow Jesus, CCSA3, dabldy | Panoramica Santos, CC2, Diego Silvestre | Sao Paulo, Brasil, CC2, Francisco Autunes | Usina Hidroelétrica Itaipu Binacional / Itaipu Dam, CC2, Deni Williams | Iguazu National Park Falls, CC3, Tomfriedel | Obelisk Buenos Aires, CC2, Nestor Galina. Notes: Various edits were made to each picture, including color, slight blurring, and sharpening. All these banners have the same license as the original pictures. - - - Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  6. 50 points
    Created using: Simtropolis Sign by Ceafus 88, and MYOS Make Your Own Sign by jbizzle. Hey everyone, Following the New Year, and the multi-million § construction of the Simtropolis Staff Sign, we're delighted to formally announce the newest arrivals to the Site Moderating Team! They are as follows (in alphabetical order): Hover over "Forums" to view the list of sections they'll be looking after. APSMS 4 Forums Avanya 3 Forums CorinaMarie 6 Forums JP Schriefer 3 Forums STEX matias93 3 Forums _Michael 5 Forums Mr_Maison 2 Forums STEX MushyMushy 5 Forums rsc204 6 Forums Toothless Stitch 5 Forums Yarahi 3 Forums STEX So if you need some assistance, there's now a few other kind & helpful staffers to turn to. Please offer your words of condolence congratulations as they begin their important site duties! Thanks! -The Admins
  7. 50 points
    andisart

    Burj Khalifa

    Alrite, alrite, alrite...! Since one year I now finally have replaced my gaming laptop from 2008 with a beefy PC rig, meaning working in 3ds Max is now much faster and rendering much less of an endless waiting thing. My PC is able to easily handle this big baby (despite low poly methods used we are at 16 million polygons now). So I always promised I would finish this project and I hold on to that promise. Now that I took this year to set up my new business in RL and that is settling I'm having more time for this also. So, as for the status of the project: currently works are being done to finish the base atm working on beefing up all the flora details left to do are all the decals for the roads, reworks of some plaza areas like the fountains at the roundabout, addition of vehicles, signs and other small details, a café area and some coach bus parking and entrance area in the back after the base is done work continues at tower, reworks of tower details and overhaul of all the balcony details, rework of windows after tower is completed then night scene with lights (kind of dreading that stage) then finalisation like error eliminations and color corrections etc., afterwards all the steps for creating lot and release Have a look at the current work-in-progress: (direct link to fullsize image: http://s1.bild.me/bilder/060112/48891232016-10-12_base.jpg
  8. 49 points
    korver

    Sydney

    Our trip to Sydney begins with one of the world's most recognizable buildings - the Sydney Opera House. Built in 1973 - its unique white seashell shape truly sets this skyline apart from the rest. Sitting just behind it is the Royal Botanic Gardens - opened in 1816, there's no better place to take a stroll on a sunny day. Just as recognizable is the world famous Sydney Harbour Bridge - built in 1932, it's one of the best ways to cross the harbour. At night, its distinctive lights dominate the surrounding waters. Water taxis are a great way to get around the harbour, and the Circular Quay (whose name contradicts its squarish shape) near the CBD is one of the most popular destinations in the entire city. Sydney is a city known for it's suburbs. In fact, it's got 555 of them - but few are as beautiful as Lavender Bay. It's easily reached by water taxi, has great views of the Harbour Bridge and the skyline in the distance - not to mention being ranked consistently as one of Sydney's most livable suburbs. It's a great place to call home. A rainy day in the CBD. Some of Sydney's most recognizable buildings can be found near Hyde Park - such as the MLC Centre, which held the title as the city's tallest building for 15 years. Nearby is the Sydney Tower - completed in 1981, you can enjoy some exotic cuisine 360 degree rotating restaurant. Another scene from the CBD - some of Sydney's tallest buildings - Deutsche Bank Place, Chifley Tower, Aurora Place, and Governor Philip Tower tower over the Royal Botanic Gardens. However, it's at night that these buildings truly come to life. And finally, some overviews of the city. Special thanks goes out to all the various creators at 3D Warehouse, as many buildings here were imported from there (too many to list). If you're interested, just search "Sydney" there and you'll find many of the same models I used - you'll need to have basic gmax/3dsmax knowledge to get the model into the game however, but it isn't very difficult. The highway system is modular, for an insight of how I created it and the process behind it, please take a look at the comments section of my "City Overview" and "Night Scenes" ST challenge entries. A pic illustrating how I set it up and some of the pieces in game can be seen here. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  9. 48 points
    This is a highly experimental fix I developed to attempt to fix the crash that occurs when hovering a puzzle piece over a transit-enabled lot. I'm not sure what practical purpose this serves for regular users but I hope this is a valuable resource for modders and other community members nonetheless. How it works This mod can now be downloaded from the STEX. The files for this fix can be located on GitHub and is just a DLL which is unzipped to the Plugins folder. The DLL first overwrites code in SC4 that would normally unload the DLL for being nonstandard. The DLL then overwrites other parts of SC4's code to take control of potentially broken portions and catch and resolve issues that would normally cause crashes. Source code can be found on the release page, and the GitHub repository as well. Visual Studio 2013 is needed for compiling. Limitations Originally, this mod only worked with DRM-removed copies of retail SC4. However, as of recent updates, this mod will now work on any fully-patched copy of retail SimCity 4 (i.e. update 640) and on the Steam version of the game (update 641). Presumably, GOG and Origin will work as well as they also use 641. It should be safe to use this mod on unsupported versions as it'll give you a nag message and just not do anything. For retail SC4, testing was done on SKU 1, but I have no reason to believe that SKU 2 (European) EXEs are actually different. Demonstration This video shows the normal CTD behavior of hovering a puzzle piece over a transit-enabled lot: This video demonstrates how hovering behaves with the fix in place: More technical details The puzzle piece CTD is caused by a null dereference, though I haven't reverse-engineered the game enough to figure out what exactly it's trying to access. The fix acts like the Detours library in Windows and relies heavily on modifying the x86 assembly instructions of the game on-the-fly. The DLL overwrites the crashy code with a jump to one of the DLL's own functions. These functions first execute whatever instructions were overwritten by the new jump instruction. For the puzzle piece issue, the fix checks to see if certain pointers (stored in x86 registers) are null, and if they are, executes the proper instructions to resolve the issue. To reference the three functions in the source code: Hook_Sub96D8E9 — if the pointer in question is null, it skips an instruction that would try to increase whatever would normally be there. Hook_Sub65EBA0 — if the pointer in question is null, it jumps directly to a piece of code which cleans up the function being called and returns out. Hook_Sub65EBA0_Pt2 — if the pointer in question is null, it sets another pointer (which would normally dereference the bad pointer) to null as well, which is handled properly by the game. I wasn't aware of other CTD issues that would be as simple to replicate, though I have heard of issues with plugin conflicts and excessive plugins causing CTDs. However, this requires significantly more time to test, catch, and resolve. A couple of minidumps posted in technical issue threads didn't indicate much, and other posts in technical issue threads were capped to 20-ish lines since it had been thought that without debugging info, these crashes couldn't be solved. It'd be useful to have more of these. With crashdumps, the EIP address can be used for finding the address of the crash, and provided it occurs within the SimCity 4.exe module (you'll have to refer to the crashdump to see if this address is between the base address and upper limit address for the game), the registers, stack frames and instruction dump can be used to try to deduce what went wrong. What now? The code for disabling SC4's DLL unloading allows modders to create DLLs which can remain in memory for as long as SC4 is open, and while it's not as versatile as a DLL with a proper framework that SC4 recognizes, it's the next best thing. This fix also provides a good basis for further excursions into the game's internals, and could be more widely distributed and used to fix more issues in the game once the problems regarding digital copies are resolved.
  10. 47 points
    korver

    Greece - Part II

    In our first Greek update, we got to take a look at one of Greece's most recognizable natural wonders. Now, we turn our attention to some of Greece's most awe-inspiring, mysterious, and magical landmarks of the past and present. --- "There is nothing permanent, except change." -Heraclitus The center of the universe - the Tholos of Delphi "Bear up, my child, bear up; Zeus who oversees and directs all things is still mighty in heaven." -Sophocles Athena's temple - The Parthenon "Experience, travel - these are as education in themselves." -Euripides Born from ashes - Santorini "I never learned how to tune a harp, or play upon a lute; but I know how to raise a small and inconsiderable city to glory and greatness." -Themistocles The capitol - Athens "In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous." -Aristotle In the heavens above - Meteora Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  11. 47 points
    korver

    Patagonia

    Our journey to Patagonia starts off in the countryside. Sheep farming is common across much of southern South America and the Falklands - introduced to the region in the late 1800s, the constant demand of sheep wool and meat ever since has kept this a vital economic activity. With the sheep population outnumbering humans 10 to 1 - you're bound to see them wherever you go. Our next stop is Ushuaia, Argentina - the southernmost town in the world. Abandoned and wrecked ships dot the harbour, such as St. Christopher - a reminder of how unpredictable the waters of the Beagle Channel can be. With dreary, foggy days being the norm here - these boats seem to fit right in. Ushuaia is located on the Tierra del Fuego (Land of Fire) archipelago - a name that comes from Spanish explorers observing the local Yaghan people's tradition of constantly keeping a fire stoked to deal with the chilly weather. In autumn however, the landscape itself turns into a "land of fire", coming alive with a beautiful display of red, orange, and yellow foliage. With much of the year being best described as bleak - it's a dramatic change that's quite stunning. In Patagonia, much of the land consists of barren plateaus and grasslands - one of the few ways to get around is by taking the Pan-American Highway, the world's longest motorable road. While much of the surrounding landscape is rather plain, there always seems to be something interesting if you look hard enough - and in this case, don't be surprised if you see a couple of llamas grazing the lands. Patagonia is dotted with countless rivers, creating great canyons as they slowly carve away the landscape. The Rio Pinturas Canyon of Argentina is perhaps the best example in all of Patagonia - it's just as dramatic as it is beautiful. Another destination you'll want to be sure to visit is the Cueva de las Manos (Cave of the Hands), tucked away in the surrounding granite cliffs - few places in South America and even the world can compare to its collection of ancient rock paintings. Our last stop might be the most spectacular of them all. Rising nearly 10,000 feet above the surrounding Patagonian landscape in relative isolation, the mountains of Chile's Torres del Paine will take your breath away. Catching a good view of them is quite difficult, with heavy clouds often covering the peaks and violent storms frequently battering the area. It only seems fitting however - this is truly one of the most untamed places on Earth and a can't miss destination of Patagonia. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Central Asia"
  12. 47 points
    korver

    Český Krumlov

    Today we take a tour through one of Europe's most charming cities - Český Krumlov, located in the Bohemia region of the Czech Republic. We begin in Svornosti Square - the town square located in the heart of the city. Its been here since medieval times - and today its lined by a number of old shops and antique stores. The Český Krumlov State Castle is one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city. Built on top of a steep cliff on the banks of the Vlatva River, the views from here are great - especially during sunsets. Its one of the most marvelous sights in the entire region - built back in the 13th century, today it houses a museum with exhibitions running frequently. Nighttime is often quiet here - making it a good time to get away from the crowds. The Virgin Mary statue located in the middle of the old square is one of the best sights at night - its hard to miss. Christmas markets are a time tested tradition in central European towns and cities - and the one hosted yearly in the town square is quite the popular attraction. With its towering Christmas tree, countless stalls, and falling snow - it truly makes for a magical atmosphere. The Vlatva River snakes and loops around the city, adding to the charm of the old town. Restaurants and shops are located along its banks, making for a picturesque experience - especially during the colors of fall. One of the most amazing times to visit Český Krumlov is during autumn - the fall foliage, crisp weather, and smaller crowds all make it a perfect time to visit the city. The atmosphere coupled with the historic buildings of the old town makes it a fairytale experience! Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Patagonia"
  13. 46 points
    A SimCity 4 Tutorial Cloud Oriented Region Import Method Adding Painted Streams by CorinaMarie@Simtropolis In this guide I present a method to create a grayscale image from which to render a random rolling hills terrain map that has water streams and rivers added. Here's a random sample of a map I created using this method: Note: The following is merely an alternative method to create a semi-realistic, fictional region map for SC4. Before you waste any time reading this please be aware that the defacto standards for map making are: SC4 Mapper, SC4 Terraformer, and Landscape Designer. Use them if you want something better. Also, as mentioned by @RobertLM78 in a reply in this thread there is another one by Ordio called Simcity 4 Region and Config Creator. However, many peeps have said they cannot run those programs on later versions of Windoze or other OS's so what I'm presenting here is simply another method by which one can make a decent map with minimal time and effort. I'm using GIMP for this guide because it's free to anyone. Any good image editing program will have the same tools I use in this guide. The method is quick and easy. Initial Steps 1. Load your SimCity 4 Rush Hour or Deluxe game and create a new region. Name it whatever you want. For this tutorial I'll use Cloud Map. Exit the game, or at a minimum, exit the new region by opening a different region. This is so the existing config.bmp file is not in use. 2. Create a new config.bmp file. For this tutorial mine will be 12x12 pixels. See Config.bmp: How to Make it Yours if you are not already familiar with it. 3. Save that config.bmp into the new region folder you just made. (Overwrite the existing one.) 4. You should now have region.ini and your config.bmp in your new region folder. Making the Grayscale Image 1. Go outside and take a picture of some clouds. 2. Load the picture into a decent imaging program. 3. [Optional] Crop it if there are cloudless parts you don't want in the image. In Gimp it's the Rectangle Select Tool over in the upper left of the tools box. Or you can press R. Draw a box around the part you want to keep. Then go to the Image Menu and select Crop to Selection... 4. Scale the image to the appropriate size based on the config.bmp you will be using. As we learned in @Birdin's config.bmp guide we multiply the dimensions of config.bmp by 64 and add 1. So 12 * 64 = 768 + 1 = 769. The height and width are the same since my config.bmp is 12 x 12. Go to the Image Menu and select Scale Image... That brings up this Scale Image dialog box. First click the little linked chain to the right of the Width and Height boxes to break the chain. This tells the program that we are not concerned about keeping the cropped selection proportional to the original image. Type in the Width and Height dimensions that you calculated in the beginning of this step. For this tutorial I entered 769 in both boxes. Then click the Scale button. 5. Convert to grayscale. Go to the Image Menu and select Mode --> Grayscale. 6. Export the image as a .Bmp file. Go to the File Menu and select Export As ... When the export dialog box comes up, look in the lower left for the little bitty plus sign in a box by the Select File Type (By Extension) and click it. That will open up the File Type selection box. Scroll down and click Windows BMP image. In the upper left in the name box, type in Gray 1 in front of the .bmp. Note only the name portion is pre-highlighted in blue indicating what part to type over. (Brilliant programming imo.) Remember which folder you export (save) the file to. That's indicated by my arrow in this next pic. Mine is going into My Documents. Click the Export Button. The next dialog box has some options. I simply click the Export Button. (I believe one could select the Run-Length Encoded to reduce the file size. I haven't tested that, so I leave it unchecked.) And here's what I created: 8. Close all files. I personally do not let it save my original clouds with the cropping and changes so that way I still have my unaltered original. 9. Close your imaging program. (Or if your comp has plenty of memory, just minimize it.) First Render (These interim steps are what I did when learning. I skip them now I know what I'm doing.) 1. In SimCity 4, open the new region you created. Mine is called Cloud Map. 2. Press the magic key combination of Shift+Ctrl+Alt+r. This brings up the file selection box. 3. Drill down to where you saved your grayscale image file and select Gray 1.bmp then click Ok. 4. Now wait while the map is rendered. You will see Creating New City like this: And here's our first draft render. Note that it's way too choppy. We will fix that soon. The reason I did this preliminary render is to see what part is water. Tweaking the Grayscale Image 1. Reopen Gray 1.bmp in your image editor. We will paint in our rivers and streams before we smooth out the rough, choppy bumps. Select the Paintbrush tool and set it to Acrylic 05. Leave the size at 20 point for now. I selected Acrylic cause it adds a random pattern to the edges of what you paint. 2. Click the foreground color selection box. It's right under all the tools on the left. That brings up the Change Foreground Color choices. Type 40 in Red, Green, and Blue. Yes, I already hear peeps saying: Wait, that's too dark. Stay with me on this. 3. Now paint in streams / rivers. A twitchy hand actually improves the realism. 4. Now to smooth out the choppiness of the hills. From the Filters menu select Blur --> Gaussian Blur... This also blends the rivers and streams so that's why I picked color level 40 (which equates to 120 meters height after rendering but doesn't count the blur merging). This'll be an area to experiment on your own based on your original cloud picture. 5. In the next dialog box change the Blur Radius to 10.0. Or pick your own number. Higher numbers means more smoothing and lower ones give less. 6. Export the image as Gray 2.bmp. Here's my new grayscale: 7. And here it is rendered: The map is now ready to paint trees in game or load your favorite terrain and tree and other landscape related mods. Or, tweak it some more. Further Refinement 1. Let's say I want everything to be a little lower elevation to get a bit more water. From the Colors menu select Levels... 2. Then I adjust the Gamma Level to 0.85. (I derived this number thru trial and error for this particular cloud image.) 3. Here's the new Grayscale image I exported as Gray 3.Bmp: 4. Here it is rendered: 5. And then I painted Maxis trees in every tile: Edit 2016.11.02 I've discovered a couple new things. I started with this cloud picture: Then in GIMP I did the normal stuff outlined above and then I used the Burn Tool to lighten the banks of the rivers: And I blurred it after that. Here's the grayscale I created: Another new thing I noticed is having mods for terrain, rocks, water, and beaches already installed means the import rendering colors the region view with them so I don't have to go into each tile to do that. Here it is rendered: Then I did go in and paint Maxis trees as thick as the program would allow: ^ What I really like is the banks of the rivers seem more realistic to me inasmuch as they show the effect of previous flooding. Also my heavier use of Gaussian Blur means the map is much more friendly when using a slope mod to lay out the transportation network. Where to go from here 1. You can alter the gray shade of your paintbrush to a lighter one and paint along the sides of the streams to create gentler slopes if you like. It's best to do that before adding the blur cause the blur does a bunch of evening out. (See my edit above. Using the Burn Tool works even better for this.) 2. If your cloud picture has a much lighter blue sky you might want to play with brightness, contrast, or color levels to darken it before for you start any other part of the editing. Use the Color Picker Eyedropper to see what shade any given area in your grayscale is. Providing you have not installed a Height Mod with an alteration to the scale factor and/or sea level, grayscale 83 is slightly below sea level. Lower values are farther under water. Grayscale 84 is slightly above water. Higher values are then higher elevations up to a max of 255 (white). 3. Experiment with various options in the imaging program. Render and see what you get. Learning by doing is loads of fun. 4. Experiment with altering the moisture content as discussed here to change the ground texture appearance. 5. Extract the Terrain Properties exemplar from Simcity_1.dat and play around with the variables there like ImageImportScaleFactor and SeaLevel or the Erosion settings. And Lastly Feel free to post your map creations in this thread. Ideally, post both the final grayscale image and then a region screenshot. Reply with what you've discovered that might be useful to other peeps.
  14. 46 points
    korver

    Central Asia

    Our journey to Central Asia begins with one of the greatest environmental tragedies of the 20th century - the shrinking Aral Sea. In 1960, it was the world's 4th largest lake with a surface area of over 26,000 sq mi - but with the rivers feeding it being diverted countless times for cotton farming, it's less than 10% of that size today. While there have been small improvements in the northern half with a recently completed dam, the rest of the lake is still in dire straights, with entire parts drying up completely in recent years. To make matters even worse, the exposed seabed is littered with harmful chemicals and cotton fertilizers - which have blown over the surrounding landscape, causing a whole host of health issues for the locals who still live in the area. The ship graveyard of Moynaq in Uzbekistan is an eerie reminder of the past - once a bustling port, the city now lies nearly 100 miles from shore. Further north past the Kazakhstan border is the city of Aral'sk - just like Moynaq, this city used to be a vital seaport in the region. Many people's entire livelihoods depended on their catches, using this port for years - but now all that remains is rusted cranes and ships lining the harbour. There is hope however. While the southern half is likely on it's last leg - the Dike Kokaral, built in 2005, has been restoring water levels in the northern half of the sea considerably in recent years. There's been talk about the city once again becoming a port - but it'll take quite some time to get there. The next destination is the Nurek Dam of Tajikistan - one of the most impressive sights in all of Central Asia. Towering some 997 feet above the town of Nurek, this Dam was built by the Soviet Union from 1961-1980 was once the tallest dam in the world. Since overtaken, it's still the largest earthen dam in the world - there's really nothing else that compares to it. For many people of central Asia, nomadic herding is a way of life. The steppes of Kyrgyzstan are an excellent place to do this with plenty of places for cattle to graze - and the many small creeks and steams that line the valleys make great places to set up a yurt as well. Evenings are special here - there's a simple beauty to watching the sun set over an endless field of grass. Our next stop is the sacred Namtso Lake, located high up on the Tibetan Plateau. The locals believe that the waters here are sacred and pure, bestowed by Buddha himself - and can wash away the sins of mankind. A number of stupas are located around the perimeter of the lake - used for meditation and to make offerings, they have a vital role in the life of a Buddhist. We climb further into Tibet and soon approach Lhasa and the Dalai Lama's home - the Potala Palace. This is one of the must see attractions of Tibet - towering above the surrounding landscape, it's been a sight to behold for well over a thousand years. Snowstorms here are rare, but when they do occur it makes for a magical atmosphere. Travel some 300 miles west and you'll come face to face with the world's tallest mountain, 29,029 ft Mount Everest (Everest seen in the middle - the world's 4th tallest, Lhotse, can be seen directly below it), located on the Tibet/Nepal border. First climbed in 1953 by Nepali Sherpa Tenzing Norgay and New Zealand mountaineer Edmund Hillary - some 5,600+ have made the ascent ever since. Despite relatively low fatality rates compared to other 8,000m+ mountains - make no mistake, this is still one of the deadliest mountains in the world, especially in winter. In winter, no mountain on the face of the planet is more terrifying than the world's second tallest peak, 28,251 ft K2, located on the Pakistan/China border. With winter temperatures routinely in the -40Cs, huge gusts of 30-50MPH winds, and regular avalanches - it's not hard to see why no one's ever made a winter ascent here. With only a little over 300 people making the ascent in total - it's one of the most difficult climbs in the world, and lives up to the name "The Savage Mountain". Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Southeast Asia"
  15. 46 points
    Indiana Joe

    Tribute to A Nonny Moose

    Rest in peace. No one had a constant and familiar presence here like John for so many years. A part of Simtropolis has gone as well.
  16. 45 points

    Version 0.0.3

    7,835 Downloads

    What does this do Resolves a crash-to-desktop when hovering NAM puzzle pieces over transit-enabled lots. Allows other DLLs to load into SC4's memory without a GZCOM framework. Requirements This fix is made for versions 640 and 641 of SimCity 4 on Windows. Version 640 is a fully-patched SC4 retail copy, and version 641 is a fully-patched digital distribution version (i.e. Steam, Origin, GOG). Although v641 is supported, it has only been tested on Steam so far. If your version of SC4 is unsupported, an error message will appear with update instructions, and no changes will be made to your game. Installation Simply unzip the DLL in your My Documents\SimCity 4\Plugins folder. To see if SC4Fix is working properly, check the title of your game window. If you are playing in fullscreen mode, alt-tab out and hover over the SimCity taskbar icon. The titlebar will show "SC4Fix (version #)" if loaded properly. Demonstration Click here for a video showing the ability to hover puzzle pieces over transit-enabled lots with this DLL. Development Thread and Source Code Development Thread Source Code Currently investigating other fixes and functionality that might be enabled with this kind of third-party DLL. Please report bugs in the dev thread.
  17. 42 points
    Pegprod

    Simpeg Productions - Farewell

    Dear Friends; It is with great sadness that we inform you of the permanent loss of the simpeg website. Pegasus has confirmed that the site has been critically damaged beyond the point of recovery. This is a huge blow for the simcity4 community as the vast majority of the simpeg knowledge-base and documentation has been lost as well. Many of you have expressed concerns over what happens to the content that was hosted on the PLEX. The good news is that Pegasus was never a believer in exclusivity and simultaneously released his content to both the PLEX and STEX as a failsafe, and the simpeg staff has followed this model over the years. This means the vast majority of simpeg content is already here on simtropolis and has been preserved. With Pegasus' blessing and Dirktator's kind help we will be creating a PLEX Legacy section here on the STEX, re-uploading and updating content as needed, as well as organizing it all into an more structured and easy to navigate whole to mirror the PLEX of old. This will be a long and tedious process, but we anticipate that 99% of the content that was on the PLEX will be maintained. We will also be attempting to update the omnibus here with what articles we've managed to save from the simposium. However, that is currently only a bare handful of what was lost. The greatest loss of all, though, is one that can not simply be re-uploaded. For many of us the Simpeg community was our electronic home. It was a tight-knit group whose interests and discussions transcended a simple game to encompass many aspects of our lives. Simpeg was a special place, not because of mere content and knowledge, but because of the people who made it greater than the sum of it's parts. So while we thank Pegasus for giving us a house all these years, it is with deep appreciation that we thank each and every one of you members of simpeg for making that house a home. What we had will well and truly be missed. It is our sincere wish that you will all find a new home, either here in the rest of the simcity community or elsewhere, and that it brings you happiness. Once again, thank YOU for making simpeg the place it was. Best Wishes, The Simpeg Staff
  18. 40 points
    korver

    Moscow

    For anyone going to Moscow, a trip down the heart of the city is a must. We begin our journey with a drive down Tverskaya Street - the most well-known road in all of Moscow. This crowded shopping district has existed since the 12th century, and the streets are lined with historic architecture wherever you look. Even with some light rain, its Russian charm is still undeniable. As we make our way around the city, the rain begins to pick up considerably. Endless rows of commie blocks dominate the surrounding landscape - their bleak repetitiveness serves as a fitting backdrop to the elements. October brings the first snow of the year - creating a beautiful atmosphere around many of Moscow's most famous landmarks such as the Lomonossov Moscow State University. Completed in 1953, its imposing facade has served as the perfect symbol of Moscow - a powerful city that serves as the financial, political, and economic capital of Russia. Once the calendar crosses over into December, temperatures plunge into the negatives as the entire city turns into a winter wonderland. Moscow is one of the coldest major cities in the world - with temperatures as low as -44F being recorded, it takes a lot to brave these months. While it may be cold outside, it's not cold enough to stop us from visiting one of Moscow's most famous tourist attractions, Red Square. Few places on earth can boast such a collection of historic buildings in one location - with the Kremlin, State Museum, St. Basil's Cathedral, and many more within walking distance. Once the seasons change and the elements begin to clear up, a beautiful, sleek city emerges. Despite still being in construction, the Moscow International Business Center (Moscow City) boasts one of the most impressive skylines in all of Europe (and in the world). Its one of a kind collection of skyscrapers on the banks of the Moskva River include the Federation Tower, City of Capitals, and Naberezhnaya Tower - all of which are equally stunning. While Moscow may be known for it's past historic architecture, Moscow City makes it clear that this is also a city with an eye on the future. NOTE: Two of these scenes (Moscow City & Red Square) feature a handful of sketchup models from sites like 3d warehouse, as there were no close replacements for certain buildings I needed. These are real models imported into the game with 3dsmax, they are like any other BAT you would use. Some editing was done though to add effects like extra nightlights and snow. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "2016: Year in Review"
  19. 40 points
    You might have come across our guest article about SimCity 4 and the Network Addon Mod over on GOG.com a few days ago. Due to format restrictions, we couldn't include a full compliment of screenshots to really show off the NAM. For posterity and for the benefit of those who didn't see it, we're including the full article here with all the screenshots that were intended in the original. - Dirktator SimCity 4 and the NAM – How to best enjoy this city-building masterpiece today. Despite being released in 2003, SimCity 4 continues to offer an unmatched city-building and story-telling experience, while also being supported by an active game community. And you can be a part of it! Developed by the once venerated, now defunct game studio, Maxis, SimCity 4 has managed to withstand the test of time remarkably well, unlike many of its contemporaries. Turning a “good old game” into something great! Not only has SimCity 4 survived, it has thrived with new creations offered daily by content-makers, and has even evolved with substantial player-developed modifications like the Network Addon Mod. Perhaps you’ve heard of the Network Addon Mod, but you’ve never tried it out. Or maybe you’ve never played SimCity 4 at all and wonder how a game from 2003 can still hold up? Read on to see just how one addon can add so much! Fixes original bugs, but it’s more than just fixes! The Network Addon Mod (NAM) is actually a collection of many addons, fixes and improvements to SimCity 4’s transportation network system, pathfinding accuracy and performance; all made to work and play seamlessly together for a vastly improved simulator experience. Originally, the Network Addon Mod (NAM) had a very simple goal: to fix a number of transportation-related issues that still remained in the game after the release of the Rush Hour Expansion and SimCity 4 Deluxe in September 2003. But as development of the mod went on, many contributors began adding new features to the transportation system. In some cases, to expand what already existed, and in others, to create entirely new systems altogether. Since 2004, work has spiraled out such that there are several expansion packs’ worth of new content, all contained in this single, free, player-created mod! The NAM brings new possibilities to the game that are simply impossible to do with the “vanilla” game. Unlock the Maxis simulator – Run it the way it was originally designed When you install the NAM, not only will you get all the fixes and tweaks that have been refined over years of playtesting and feedback, but you’ll also be playing the simulator as it was originally designed! The thing is, Maxis had programmed a very sophisticated and robust traffic simulation engine that most people have never experienced! This is because of the hardware limitations at the time, Maxis had to significantly tune down the simulation parameters in order to allow the game to run on 500Mhz Pentiums, prevalent specs for that era. The result of that down-tuning is that the traffic patterns in the base game often simply follow the shortest distance, and fail to take into account the speed and capacity differences of the different networks. Basically, this prevented the game from working the way it was intended. For instance, with that down-tuned simulator, one could spend the money to build the faster, higher-capacity road-types, or a rail transit system, but the residents would completely ignore it and instead clog up tiny residential streets as they tried to get to work. If you’ve played the vanilla SimCity 4 for long enough, you will have likely seen this happen. Fixing this key part of the simulator allows the NAM and its numerous new and improved systems, to provide a rich and engaging simulating experience that you’ll never get with the vanilla SimCity 4. Several Expansion Packs’ worth of content – all in one place, for free! But more than just fixes and improvements, the NAM brings several new transport options unavailable in “vanilla” SimCity 4 such as a slew of enhancements to the road system, including diagonal streets, more bridge options, specialized lanes and roundabouts. You’ll get elevated viaducts for a number of normally ground-level transportation networks, such as Roads, One-Way Roads, Avenues, and Railroads. Industrial/office park district, with RealHighways, Network Widening Mod features, and One-Way Road Roundabouts on display. Avenue Roundabout and Wide-Radius Curves near an office park. Prefer things on the ground instead? Use the Ground Light Rail (GLR), a ground variant of the Elevated (Light) Rail network, which comes in draggable form. Or maybe you want a mix of ground and elevated that can run in, on or over other surfaces? You can do that, too, with the NAM’s “Dual Networking” options. Fractional Angle RealRailway and Network Widening Mod (Narrow 4-Lane Road) in action. Fractional Angle Roads and Diagonal Streets in a suburban residential setting. It includes the Network Widening Mod (NWM) which provides wider (and narrower) draggable variants (many with capacity boosts) to the game’s core Road and One-Way Road networks. More road options to play with like expanded Avenues with 6 lanes, or expand One-Way Roads up to 5 lanes. Get even finer control by adding continuous turn lanes, or adding a turn lane to your One-Way Roads. Lakeside business/resort district, with 4-Lane One-Way Roads and Narrow 4-Lane Road from the Network Widening Mod. 6-lane Avenue from the Network Widening Mod in a suburban setting. New FLEX Turn Lanes and Signalized One-Way Road Intersections in a business district. Tired of grid-like cities? The NAM offers myriad grid-busting options, including wider radius curves and fractional angles to many different networks types. If you love roundabouts these are improved with many enhancements, from smaller Street Roundabouts to multi-lane Avenue and Dutch Turbo Roundabouts. One-Way Road Roundabouts, Ground Light Rail, and Ground Light Rail-in Road Dual-Networking in an office district. Suburban residential area, with Wide-Radius Curves and Fractional Angle Networking. Farms and factories, featuring RealRailways, Elevated Road Viaducts, and Road Wide-Radius Curves. The entire railway system has been overhauled with multiple height levels and modular interchange capabilities. Everyone loves building highways. Here, the NAM doesn’t disappoint by offering an entirely new Highway System with several width variants, up to 5 lanes per direction, multiple height levels and modular interchange capabilities. If you love interchanges, the NAM’s intersection capabilities let you design that monster 8-way Avenue intersection you really wanted. Mammoth arterial intersection, featuring the upcoming FLEX Turn Lanes and Network Widening Mod (7-Lane Turning Lane Avenue). Partial cloverleaf interchange, built using the RealHighway (RHW) system and One-Way Road Roundabouts, plus Road Wide-Radius Curves. Busy suburban junction, built using the RealHighway (RHW) system, Network Widening Mod (5-lane Turning Lane Avenue), Street Wide-Radius Curves, and turn lane functionality. If you still wish to use the game’s base “Maxis” Highways, a number of interchange options, plus a full-on reskin are available. The NAM also includes Euro/international road and highway textures. And the Street Addon Mod (SAM) will provide 10 (soon to be 11) texture variants for the base Street network! Railways get a complete overhaul with the RealRailway (RRW) system, which offers a more realistic version of the game’s base Rail network, plus a number of new options for switches, curve radii and fractional angles, plus – coming in Version 36 – draggable viaducts. RealRailway FlexTrack and Single-Track Rail in a dirty industrial area. New FLEX Turn Lanes (coming to the upcoming Version 36 release) and Signalized One-Way Road Intersections. Four-level stack interchange, built using the RealHighway (RHW) system's modular components. Bustling office district, with Ground Light Rail-on-Road Dual Networking, Network Widening Mod (5-Lane Turning Lane Avenue), and Street Addon Mod Parking Lots on display. If you’re a glutton for even more control, you’ll love the Traffic Simulator Configuration Tool (TSCT), a handy program that allows one to customize some parameters of the NAM's “tuned-up” traffic simulator, including different capacity levels (ranging from extremely low to ultra high) and mass transit usage SimCity 4 is arguably the best city-simulation game ever produced by Maxis. Nearly 15 years old, the game has proven its longevity in large part due to a legion of highly devoted fans and communities like Simtropolis.com. The Network Addon Mod brings so much to your city-building game that it’s a crime to play without it! What you need to get started You'll need SimCity 4 Deluxe with Rush Hour Expansion, get it here from GOG.COM The NAM is available for both PC and MAC versions of the game, get them from Simtropolis. If you want even more, we've collected some of the best buildings and lots for SimCity 4 in our Simtropolis Exchange (STEX) Collector's Edition discs, given as a gift when you Donate!
  20. 40 points

    Version 1.0.0

    3,220 Downloads

    This is a fictional classical building designed by me. This just a eyecandy landmark in game. Install: There are two versions available , pick one -Dark nite version or Maxis nite version. Drop all files into your documents/SimCity 4/Plugins Dependencies: LBT Mega Prop Pack vol 01
  21. 39 points
    korver

    Journey Through The Sahara

    Our next stop takes us to the famous Sahara Desert - the world's largest hot desert. For thousands of years, nomads have adapted to the harsh terrain, with an extensive knowledge of the terrain being absolutely vital to their survival. Knowing exactly where each and every oasis is located is perhaps the single most important aspect to this, and we approach our first one in the Ennedi Plateau of Chad. Guelta d'Archei is perhaps the Sahara's most famous oasis, and has been used since prehistoric times, note the cave paintings on the walls. The water's distinctive black hue - caused by untold amounts of camel dung over the years - hides the lake's most dangerous species quite well, the Nile crocodile. Hopping from oasis to oasis is crucial for anyone traveling in the Sahara, and fortunately we're able to find another one just in time. The small town of Bardaï, Chad, has been an important trading post in the region for centuries. Unfortunately, droughts have ravished the landscape and the riverbed is almost completely bare. There's just enough water left over for the camels. After a month-long northern excursion in search of pastures, the caravan finally starts to head back south through the mighty Grand Erg Occidental, but not before they come face to face with one of the Sahara's greatest dangers. An enormous sandstorm engulfs the caravan, and rages on for nearly an entire day. Fortunately, by sitting to the side of their camels, they're able to lessen the blow and eventually get back on their feet. After nearly a month more of traveling, we finally reach our end destination of Djenné, Mali. Every Monday, the entire region takes part in market day - truly a sight to behold. Just under the shadow of the magnificent Great Mosque, the streets come alive with countless shoppers and market vendors, giving them the much needed opportunity to trade camels or goods. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  22. 39 points
    Hello simtropolis, it's been awhile but after a long adjournment I'm finally back with some new content. For those who many not be aware back in October my SC4(and windows) hard drive(SSD) crashed. This eliminated everything I had created after entry 35 on this Journal. Feb 2016 was the last time I backed everything up(plugins, cities, pictures, etc) on a separate hard drive. Foolish, I know. It's not that I overlooked the possibility of a hard drive crash, in fact all my important personal stuff is backed up on separate drive and some of that is even backed up a second time on bluray discs. I backed my SC4 cities on weekly basis but for some strange reason at some point in time, I can't recall why (or understand), I moved that backup folder onto the SSD drive. So while I was still well prepared for save file corruption I was not prepared for hard drive corruption. The rest of what follows would probably qualify as TMI so I've have put it in spoilers since most of it is not exactly SC4 related and it kind of bogs down this entry. Most of you are understandably here for pics so this way you can get right to them. Note; Entry number 43 is reserved as a placeholder in case I'm one day able to recover the data that was meant to be shown in that entry. Now onto today's subject matter which will cover what is probably going to be the largest and most complicated interchange in the entire region of Pretoria - The 5 Point's Interchange. This interchange is located in the City of Calgon which is just west of Baycole and north of Dresden. It think I came up with the name Calgon from Calgary, but at this point I can't remember The interchange is the junction between Highways 700, 702 & 707 and as it's name suggests it is a 5 way interchange. This is the first RHW rebuild of this interchange. I say first because there is a second rebuild of the interchange which features no tunnels and is much more streamlined in appearance. But it's so different from this one that it's basically an entirely different interchange and this version is so massive that it would be a shame to not showcase it. edit* For a better understanding of the network I'm adding the regional highway map here; This entry was incredibly difficult to make. It seems the save file for the city is highly unstable/incompatible with my current plugins folder or something. In the process of rebuilding this interchange the game crashed about 50 or so times in the last several weeks which severely hampered my progress. I've encounter errors and crashes which I had never seen or even heard about before. The numerous ways the game crashed on me are listed below, I've also placed this in the spoiler to shorten the dialog that is relevant to the point of this entry; So where to begin with this one... how about with a map of the entire interchange and how it compares to the previous record holder of the title of the regions largest interchange - Spaghetti Junction. All maps are the exact same scale. Spaghetti Junction(newest & more compact version) vs 5 points. And the old Spaghetti Junction which was larger vs 5 points vs The 5 points <---- is north One of the reasons why creating maps of interchanges interest me so much is long ago even well before I ever played SimCity when I was maybe 10 year old I was completely mesmerized by city maps and the most interesting part of those city maps were where all those squiggly and curved lines which converged in tiny areas - interchanges. Afterword I would create random huge interchange designs on paper, wish I still had those but they disappeared long ago most likely throw away as junk by my parents Ok let's go through the interchange from south to north starting from the 702 Northbound at the south portal. Highway 702 comes from Dresden and the South Shore borough of Pretoria. There is also one other(very large) interchange between the 5 Points and Dresden in Calgon that I'll show later. The 702 is highly congested at this point being only 4 lanes across. In the final version of 5 points this section has been upgrade to 6 lanes. The Fastraxx ME(Middle East) Commuter Rail line can be see at the top running underneath the highway in a tunnel before reaching Calgon (Central) Station while the L(Loop) line runs over the highway at the bottom of the image. For a refresher on commuter rail the network click HERE. Meanwhile ICR's freight line is on the right hand side of this image. Now here is where things start to get messy. The first lane at the top of the image is a local off ramp from the 702. Next is the EB 707 to SB 702 ramp. Then a local on-ramp, followed by 4 lanes of the 702 itself, then the NB 702 to EB 700/707 & NB 707 ramp and then finally a local off ramp. 4. (note: image number count does not include the road maps) The next off ramp is the NB 702 to WB 707 which takes you directly into downtown Calgon. Overview of the Southern portal to the interchange. 7. 8. The NB 702 to WB 700 ramp is the tallest ramp in the interchange and is 45m/148ft above the lowest part of the interchange about 50m/164ft above the lowest tunnel. 9. Crossing over the 700 Overview of the Eastern portal of the interchange. The 700/707 is up to 13 lanes wide in this section and from here continues on to Spaghetti Junction in Lindin City. Next we come to my favorite portion of the interchange, the central section. This maps shows the 7 levels of the interchange + arguably a 8th level for one of the tunnels. What little help this may be, it explains the purpose of each overhead ramps and the routing of the tunnels which are functional for cars and buses but not trucks. Yup it's a little on the complicated side 12. 13. 7 levels of interchange in one image. Can you make out all the height transitions in there? Hint; there's 13 Moving further north we get to the point where the 700 crosses over the 702 And then we get to the second big section of cluster of ramps. I'm not sure it would help to talk about which ramp goes where, probably best just to look at panoramic shots at the bottom of the entry to make sense of it all. 17. 18. The 700 crossing over the 3 rail lines with exit ramps going both over and under it, one of my favorite images 19. This would be the western portal of the interchange. Back to the 702 which now turns into a collector/express highway system. 22. This leads us to the final part of the interchange the northern gate and the boundary to Astoria, which takes us to the downtown area of Pretoria. 24. 25. Aside from those sharp level 3 RHW curves, which hopefully will be smooth out in the future, I'm quite satisfied with the look and compactness of this section. 27. You may have noticed a few other unusual things up there and kudos to you if you noticed all four The most obvious one is probably that one way bridge in there which might seem odd because it looks a little different from the rhw roads above and below it. I could of used a rhw overpass but then there wouldn't have been enough space to transition into the one-way road tunnel. I suppose I could of just built the rhw bridge just for eye candy purposes but I wanted to show the interchange in it's functional configuration. That is every path is usable by sims, although I'm having a heck of a time trying to get them to take some of those paths, seems they'd rather be stuck in traffic on local roads then take the express out of town. I had to use a subway portal where the level 3 RHW crosses the the 3 railway tracks. It might look a little strange but it's much better than the alternative. Seems the level 3 RHW can't cross over 3 consecutive rail lines, it drops to a ground level crossing for the one in the middle which would of course look ridiculous. Meanwhile the subway portal ensure functionality on the railway line in the middle since passenger trains can turn into subway turns and vice versa without issue. The freight line on the top remains functional as well. It was very difficult to create this interchange because of all the grade changes over it's length, which resulted in the irregular ripples on the maxis highway curve. For those who don't know grade changes and the RHW go together like oil and water, thankfully with each version of the NAM terrain stability continues to improve. The original footprint of the maxis interchange that came before was much smaller so the city was originally built without realizing that one day I would need much more space for an interchange. For the final version of the 5 points I'm building I completely leveled out the terrain and started from scratch againt to build a fully accessible version without the use of tunnels. Lastly I had to use one of the old 45 degree flex fly ramps because the new piece is one zone large(5x5 as opposed to 4x4). That tiny little difference would otherwise have resulted in major changes to the interchange and a large expansion of its overall footprint. I know many rhw users might of been fine with that since highway interchange are space consuming objects, but I pride myself on building the tightest possible interchange while using smooth curves and transitions as much as possible. I had to modify the NAM files in order for this legacy piece to still show up in game. While I can't plop them anymore they won't disappear, which is what would happen if I didn't modify the file and more importantly they are still completely functional. Next a few night shots to show that there is sufficient lighting around the interchange. Even though you may not know how to get to where you want to be you can at least see where your going! 29. 30. 30. 31. Now time for a little something I call the "eye spy" section... Let me know if you like this new section. 33. 34. 35. And finally, of course the mosaics. For reference sake I put the the original maxis version of the interchange that I set out to replace long ago in the spoilers below. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. Forgot to add the interchange Stats!Levels - 4All Highways total entrance lanes - 41Bridge Structures - 15Total Crossings, time sa highway ramp crosses another - 37(not including tunnels)Tunnels - 5Ramps - 26 FlexFly Ramps - 8 (2 - 90 degree/6 - 45 degree)Height Transitions - 33 Thanks for stopping by, it feels good to get the CJ up and running again.
  23. 39 points
    mattb325

    Harrods

    Version 1.0.0

    2,022 Downloads

    Harrods, by Mattb325. --------------------------------------- Inspired by the iconic department store on Brompton Rd, Knightsbridge, Harrods is presented as a CS§§§ growable and ploppable lot for your cities. Please be aware that the present day Harrods has been extended and remodelled a number of times since the main building on Brompton Rd was completed in 1905, so this is NOT a strict recreation, but what I present is faithful to the original façade as designed by Charles Stephens, albeit with modifications to make it more game-ready. I have only modelled the front portion of the building. It must be noted that the present building has completely over-run the old streets of 'Queens Gardens' and 'New Place' and wrapped its way around what used to be known as Queen Street and Lower North St (since renamed Hans Rd and Basil St respectively), consuming the old Hans Mansion block and other buildings in the process. Because these streets run at odd angles and curves, even with the FAR roads and other NAM advances, I felt that modelling all of this would make the building almost completely unusable for the average player. Additionally the original building, aligned to Brompton Rd, was slightly wedged shaped - the old line is still somewhat visible under all of the present day roof additions from Google earth along the Hans Rd façade. Naturally I have squared this off to get this into game, which means that the rear of the building is completely fictitious. The present roof junk and extension of the Mansard roof along all facades is modelled - with slight variations by me - on the most up-to-date renovations: you can compare the differences by using the Google earth program (up-to-date) vs. Bing ?birds-eye/Google maps (out-of-date) to see the remarkable difference to the roof-top in recent years. Lastly, in order to fit the building on a maximum of 8 tiles (which will give it at least some chance of growing), I have removed one set of windows near the turret. Given the lag on my computer, I have also avoided modelling the hundreds of bulbs on the Hans Cres and Hans Roads sides. With all of that said, if you are strictly puritanical about recreations being 100% accurate, then please do not download this. The lot comes in two flavours: a growable Commercial Services and a ploppable, functional C§§§ lot, which is found in the Landmarks Menu. Both have the same stats. --------------------------------------- STATS CS§§§ & Ploppable CS§§§: Lot size : 8 x 4 Growth Stage: 8 (Medium and High Density Zoning)/Ploppable Bulldoze Cost: §631 Capacity Satisfied: CS§ 11,140, CS§§ 2,787, CS§§§ 1,117 Pollution: 50 (Air)/ 33 (Water)/ 67 (Garbage ) Pollution Radius: 6/7/0 Power Consumed: 209 Mwh Water Consumed: 1,871 Gal/Month Building Style: Chicago/NY/Houston/Euro (N/A for Ploppable) Occupant Group: Commercial Services Building NOTE ABOUT DARK NITE vs MAXIS NITE: This download contains TWO model files; one for dark nite users (and other night-time darkening mods, such as Gizmos night-mod) and one for the standard Maxis nite. You must keep only one file - depending on which version you use. If you are unsure whether you have a night-darkening mod installed, then choose the Maxis night version. Regardless of which file you choose to keep, make sure you DO NOT delete the Lot File! If you use the dark nite version, you will need a dark nite mod. DEPENDENCIES: --------------------------------------- This lot does not require external dependencies. --------------------------------------- To install, simply unzip the contents of this file into your plugins folder.
  24. 37 points
    korver

    London - Landmarks

    For the final chapter of London, we're taking a look at some more of the city's most iconic landmarks. We begin with a look back in time to the 1200s - to the Old London Bridge. Constructed in 1209 - this bridge stood for over 600 years as the main route across the River Thames. While long gone, various drawings from the era depict a bustling bridge surrounded by medieval houses on both sides. Unfortunately, the design of the bridge led to its ultimate demise, as it impeded river traffic - and was eventually demolished in the 1800s to make way for a more modern bridge. The next stop is one of London's most awe-inspiring buildings - St. Paul's Cathedral. Designed by famed architect Christopher Wren and opened in 1708, it was part of a major rebuilding program after the Great Fire of London in 1666. The cathedral serves as the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London - and is one of the city's most popular attractions as well. The London Eye is one of the city's most popular attractions - located on the banks of the River Thames, it was the world's largest Ferris wheel when completed in 2000. If you can get past the long lines, the views of the city's South Bank from the top are incredible. We continue on with a trip to one of London's most famous bridges - Tower Bridge. Not to be confused with the original London Bridge (as seen in the first picture, since replaced with more modern versions) - this Victorian Gothic landmark has been one of the city's most distinctive sights since its completion in 1894. Close by Tower Bridge is another one of the city's famous landmarks - the Tower of London. This historic structure was built back in the 1190s and has served as a fortress, palace, and prison. Our next stop is one of the city's most famous squares - Trafalgar Square. Its named after the famed Battle of Trafalgar - a key British naval victory in 1805 - and it's been a popular gathering place for people (and pigeons) since 1840. The iconic Nelson's Column in the middle of the square is one of the city's most famous monuments. Our last stop is one of the world's most iconic buildings - Big Ben. This famous clock tower is located on the north end of the Palace of Westminster and has chimed since 1859. Recent maintenance repairs though means you'll have to wait until 2021 to hear it regularly again. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Previous Update: "London - The City & The Shard" Big thanks to @matias93, @RobertLM78, @The British Sausage, @Angry Mozart, @RandyE, @scotttbarry, @Odainsaker, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @bobolee, @nos.17, @mrsmartman, @_Michael, @APSMS, @mike_oxlong, @mattb325, @SC4L0ver, @Mr Saturn64, @Dreadnought, @tonyr, @jakis, @Neto Dari, @gigius76, @raynev1, @Toby Ferrian, @Fantozzi, @Tonraq, @Elenphor, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
  25. 37 points
    korver

    South Pacific

    After a brief absence, our journey picks back up on the small nation of Palau, an archipelago of over 200 small islands in the far Western Pacific Ocean. Numerous volcanic explosions many eons ago pushed coral larvae up and out of the Earth's core, forming a massive limestone reef - and the erosion since then has given Palau's islands their distinctive mushroom shape. As most of the 200 islands are quite rocky with palms and mangroves draping over the waters' edge, it takes us a bit to find a nice beach, but we're sure to enjoy it once we get there. Later on in the day, we get out our snorkels and explore the vast coral reefs that surround the island - making sure to avoid the many sharks that call the waters home. We get back on our cruise ship and spend the next couple of weeks making stops at various South Pacific islands, none of which however are as beautiful as Tahiti's Bora Bora. The small atoll was formed by a massive volcanic explosion some three million years ago, and has been slowly sinking back into the ocean ever since. The waters that surround much of the islands are extremely shallow, giving the the locals the opportunity to build structures directly on the water - which is where we'll be staying tonight. Our thatched hut on stilts provides us an up close view of the many bent palm trees and pristine coral reefs that surround the island, and we take a moment to enjoy the island as the sun begins to set. We board the cruise ship once again and 1,500 miles later, we reach Pitcairn Island. Pitcairn's history goes back to 1789, where Fletcher Christian staged a mutiny against the William Bligh, captain of the British navy ship HMS Bounty. Christian and a small number of other mutineers settled on Pitcairn - making Adamstown their main settlement. To this day, nearly all of the 56 inhabitants of Adamstown are descendants of the original mutineers, and a number of them will be greeting us when our cruise ship reaches the island, which is traditional when a ship reaches the small port. After a small dinner in the square, we take a look around the island - not much seems to have changed since 1789. Not a single car or vehicle can be found on the entire island, making Adamstown seem very much stuck in time. Despite fighting flying cockroaches and spiders for the majority of our stay in our one bedroom shack, we take a liking to Adamstown's charm, with it's unique assortment of pines and palms along with the pounding waves that never cease to stop. Our final stop in our journey across the Pacific is Chile's Easter Island. After getting off our cruise ship, we check out some of the Moai that dot the island as we make our way to Anakena Beach. Rano Raraku is one of the best locations to do so, and it gives us the opportunity to get up and close with some of the Moai - but not too close, as touching the Moai is strictly prohibited. Special thanks to Simmer2 for sending me the Moai models used in this picture! We finally reach Anakena Beach. Anakena is one of two beaches that Easter Island has to offer - the rest of the island is quite rocky and barren, making it a popular tourist destination. We're surrounded by wild horses, endless palm trees, and the sound of crashing waves once we get to the beach, and Moai statues face inwards towards the island to greet us once we get there. The Rapa Nui people purposely placed the Moai facing inland while they were being constructed some 600-800 years ago - to show that they were protecting and honoring the people of Easter Island. The mysterious Moai statues offer more questions than answers: how were they built, how were they set up, and how did the Rapa Nui people move the statues across the island? No one really knows for certain, so we just sit back and admire their greatness. After checking out the Moai, we spend the rest of our day lounging around in our inner tubes, taking in the natural beauty of the island. Easter Island is truly a one of a kind destination, and it makes for a fitting end to our South Pacific journey. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! Thanks -korver
  26. 37 points
    korver

    Conquering Mount Fitz Roy

    Jutting 11,020 feet out of the southern Patagonian landscape, the imposing sheer granite walls of Mount Fitz Roy makes it the one of the crown jewels of the southern Andes. Technically challenging climbing routes coupled with notoriously bad weather makes it one of the toughest climbs in the world, but the view from the top makes it all worth it. Day 1 Our journey starts off in the sleepy little town of El Chaltén, Argentina, right at the footstep of Mount Fitz Roy. Our group meets up to discuss our routes in the upcoming days - the weather looks like it'll be manageable, but in this part of the world, that could change in the blink of an eye. We set off for Fitz Roy, and we're immediately in for a treat. The fall foliage is in full swing surrounding the misty Rio Fitz Roy, making for an absolutely gorgeous view. We won't be here long however, as the terrain quickly starts to get much more challenging. After several more miles of walking, we start to approach the base of the mountain and get our first up close view of the surrounding peaks, Techado Negro and Aguja de la 'S'. They're beautiful, no doubt - but they pale in comparison to the peak we're headed to next. Nightfall begins to set in, so we set up our tents and call it a day. Day 2 The day started off fairly easily - a straight forward climb up the mountain. However, our plans quickly got derailed when a storm approaches us, making any technical climbing an impossibility. We decide to instead take cover in a rocky outcrop and wait it out. Conditions finally improved just enough for us to continue on - and we begin to make our ascent up near-vertical granite cliffs. We had originally planned on setting up our tents on a small, flat plateau a couple hundred feet away - but due to previous setbacks, we fall behind and the darkness combined with driving rain makes any more climbing far too dangerous. We're forced to precariously hang our tents off the side of the mighty Aguja Poincenot instead. Day 3 Conditions still aren't great, but we continue to push on. The granite cliffs are coated with a thin layer of ice and storm clouds begin to roll in, making things far more dangerous than we had originally thought. However, despite the conditions, we persevere and finally reach the peak of Mount Fitz Roy. We proudly set up our Argentinian flag and take in the beautiful view - it's just as good as you would imagine. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  27. 37 points
    korver

    2016: Year in Review

    So give or take a couple of days, it's now been exactly one year since I decided to seriously get involved with SC4. To celebrate the occasion, I've decided to do a retrospective entry on some of mine and the community's favorite pictures from this CJ in 2016, with some commentary as well. Additionally, I'll be expanding upon various tips and techniques I discussed in 2016 along with adding some more as well. I'd also like to take this opportunity to thank everyone once again for your supportive comments and likes in 2016 - they really kept me going, even when motivation was running low at times. Additionally, I apologize for the lack of updates recently. As you might expect, the last two updates of 2016 (Sydney and South America) were extraordinarily time consuming and draining - so some time off was in order. I'm still slightly burnt out.. but I am finally starting to finish up a couple of updates, so I will be unveiling those shortly. Lake Bogoria For my first entry in True Earth, I wanted to make a big entrance - so what better way to do that than a 10,000 pixel tall mosaic? Key pieces in Lake Bogoria included SE Asian slummy houses from nihonkaranws + Heblem tiki huts in the villages, various trees by SimFox, Heblem, girafe, and CP, Flamingo generators from SC4Devotion, and geysers from Craig-Abcvs. Journey Through The Sahara I've always loved the idea of an ultra crowded market, so Djenne, Mali was one of the first urban scenes that I created for this CJ. Generally, my rule is simple when it comes to these scenes - keep on adding more and more props in LE until I hit the prop limit (1,200 or so). nbvc's bazaar and Asian street market was vital here - but perhaps most important was Uki's stalls. It's amazing what you can find after doing a little digging around on various Japanese SC4 sites. For anyone interested in this lot, it's available on the STEX here (slightly trimmed to cut down on a massive dependency list). The sweltering small oasis town of Bardai, Chad. Given the small amount of desert-looking buildings readily available on the STEX and other sites, I had to get creative, utilizing a a little bit of everything that I could find. This included a mixture of kevinman houses, frogface slums, Wallibuk slums, Heblem tiki huts, and others. But perhaps the most interesting was the SimMars buildings that I used that fit surprisingly well. To finish off the scene, careful usage of the Poseidon terrain brushes was instrumental. Conquering Mount Fitz Roy Patagonia's mountains are impressive, but just as impressive is its fall colors. The Rio Fitz Roy dramatically cuts through the landscape - a mixture of brown Murimk MMP rocks and the brown boulders included in nbvc's Rock 'n' Stones (just don't drag them - click over and over until you get the big ones) did a great job of achieving that mountainous feel. Now we come face to face with the majestic Cerro Fitz Roy. Mountainous terrain mods are difficult to perfect in SC4, but I felt the one I made for this update did a pretty nice job of bringing out the imposing nature of this mountain. Myrtos Beach One of my favorite updates I made during 2016, Myrtos Beach was originally planned as the final piece to a massive Greece update. However, it quickly became apparent that it deserved an update of it's own. I got things started off with this simple yet beautiful sunset picture - it's amazing how small details such as photoshopped lights on the boat, house, and cars can make a big difference, making the picture feel much more alive. We move on to the overview of the beach. For this scene, it was vital having the right portion of various MMPs working together - which included Girafe Parasols + Cypresses and Heblem plop rocks + Chihuahuan flora. Greece - Part II I've always liked ruin scenes - there's always seems to be something magical about them. Bringing the Tholos of Delphi to life in the SC4 world meant lots of Aubrac walls, nbvc stone paths, and an assortment of random rocks and plop sands. After getting the hang of this technique quickly, I further explored the idea of SC4 MMP ruins with my Great Zimbabwe pic in my "Scenes From Africa" update. Athens - my first true city scene. Once I saw some of swi21's great Athenian buildings I knew I wanted to make an Athens recreation - but the lack of Greek urban buildings was an issue. I ended up finding some pretty close replacements on SimCity Polska - check the "After 1920" section. Meteora, Greece. The trickiest part to this picture was definitely the mountains and how to make sure they didn't look stretched. Vortext gave me a great tip - make sure you check the 'TerrainTexTilingFactor" property in your Terrain controller (If you're using a terrain mod - just search "controller" and you *should* find it in your plugins. Some are named differently though - so you might need to do a little looking around.) The terrain tiling factor is set at 0.2 by default - which generally produces stretched rock faces. Increasing this number to say, 0.25, 0.3, or higher will give a more realistic look on steep surfaces, but it will look a bit more tiled as a slight trade off. It's still a big improvement though over the default. South Pacific Anakena Beach, Easter Island. Here, I experimented heavily with MMPed grass - my technique was to work in layers. I got started off placing a base of PEG grass/moss for a lush, tropical look. After that, a random assortment of girafe seasonal flowers were plopped down, acting as areas of tall grass. Finally, I sprinkled in some of ChrisAdams' green rye grass to make certain areas thicker than others. One last thing I did was also sprinkle in some brown rye grass, light straw, and regular straw from ChrisAdams - these acted as areas of dead grass, and provided some much needed color variation. Small girafe bushes, berries, and feather grass were added too, to break up the landscape a bit. Also, an important note for anyone ever planning on using Moai in SC4 - make sure they have their backs facing the ocean. The locals believed that this signified the Moai were watching over them from intruders. I had to re-do the pic because of that Adamstown, Pitcairn Islands. For scenes like these, I wanted to place MMPs right around the buildings - which meant shrinking the occupant size down to 1x1x1. Additionally, I wanted them to blend in perfectly with the landscape - which meant deleting any existing base/overlay textures. (note: before making any edits, please note that plopping lots stripped of textures on steep surfaces may result in a visual glitch where the texture turns black instead. If you are considering placing these lots onto steep surfaces, one workaround is to place the already shrunken to 1x1x1 prop/building (if it's the latter, you'll need to convert it into a prop via Plugin Manager/PIMX) onto the the default Pz1x1 Grass lot in Lot Editor and delete the textures on that lot instead - small filler lots like these do not seem to suffer from the same issue.) Your lot will of course now function as a park, but it will allow you to plop it where you want without base texture issues. (One additional note - sometimes the .sc4lot and .sc4desc files will be bundled into a .dat file. In that case (and if you're able to track down the .dat file), you'll need to do some searching around for the right files - clicking the "entry" tab at the top will sort them, so that should make your job easier). The first thing you need to do is shrink the occupant size so you can place MMPs around the perimeter - open a lot's associated .sc4desc file in Reader, choose exemplar file on the left, click the Occupant size category, and shrink it down to 1,1,1 (pic). Click "set", "apply", save the file and you're done. As deleting all base textures is not possible in the Lot Editor, you'll need to instead find the .sc4lot file associated with a lot and open it up with Ilive's reader (make sure this is set up with the correct options/property files first) From there, navigate to the "Exemplar file" category on the left (there might be multiple "exemplar files" - the one you need for will say "LotConfigurations" at the top") and scroll down the list of "LotConfigPropertyLotObjectData" entries. Any entry beginning with 0x00000002 will be a base/overlay texture - deleting all of these (pic) will clear the lot of any and all textures (make sure you right click again after doing any deleting and choose "Reindex LotConfig" too) Scenes From Africa The chaotic African capital of Lagos. Continuing on with the trend of crowded cities, I don't think I'll ever make another one as packed as this. A mixture of Motokloss cars and cars from the massive LBT prop pack 1 fit the mood nicely - especially the yellow vans from the Motokloss pack which matched the infamous yellow Danfos buses that crowd the streets. As for building selection, you can't go wrong with Walibuk's South American buildings + his African slums too. Some of Glenni's buildings + the Hong Kong themed buildings in the Dong He Night market pack fit surprisingly well too. Majestic Victoria Falls. I once saw a pic a long time ago in @_marsh_'s legendary CJ "Royal Gansbaai Kingdoms" featuring an awesome photoshopped waterfall and it blew my mind. I knew it was something that I just had to try out. The Amazon Deep in the heart of the jungle lies Manaus. I really wanted to portray a city that truly felt like it was in the jungle - so I went a little heavier than usual with the editing. Mist/cloud brushes, a levels adjustment to really bring out some of the yellows/oranges, and a soft white diffuse glow all gave the the feeling of a hot Amazonian city. Now we move into the jungle itself with one of the Amazon's many stunning tributaries. My favorite part to this picture has to be the sand bars. To get them perfectly razor sharp, a technique that I employed (both in this picture and others) was to combine a water mod with an MMP such as JRJ dirty ploppable water or PEG grass/clover on the edges. Make sure the two are of matching colors - and you will be able to use the MMP to sculpt razor sharp lines along the borders. It generally should blend together perfectly (but you might need to tweak your water opacity, look here for a guide on how to do that). Scenes From Europe Pisa was the first time that I experimented with creating a completely customized texture for a city scene. It was tricky though, because the footprint of the buildings I used in this picture didn't match real life, so a perfect 1:1 scale recreation would look off. So I had to do a different technique for this picture. What I did was plop the important buildings in the game first, closely aligned to real life. I then turned the grid on in game and created a checkerboard pattern in Photoshop like this, outlining the placement of the buildings in the game. I'd then overlay the checkerboard from time to time while constructing the texture, with the final result turning out like this. From there, it was a matter of simply creating a flat plane in 3dsmax (I believe it was 10x13), placing the texture on it, and rendering it for use in game. The simple scene that I initially made in the game was then reconstructed in the Lot Editor, placing the main buildings on top of the big flat texture prop I made, along with lots and lots of detail work. Ronda was one of my absolute favorite pics I made. The lotting was especially tricky for this picture however, with the jagged cliffs causing issues. Because you can only make square lots in Lot Editor, this meant that some of the base textures would be overhanging over the edge of the cliffs. To remedy this, something you can do is place the base textures (I recommend choosing different textures - and also noting their texture ID) you want deleted as the very last thing you do before saving. You can then open up the .sc4lot file in Ilive's reader, and the textures/props placed last will be the very last "LotConfigPropertyLotObjectData" entries. To confirm you're deleting the right ones - any textures start off with 0x00000002 and their texture ID will be visible as the last value in the 13 rep entry. Delete the textures you want gone and you can now have a lot in pretty much shape you want (although, it will still "technically" be a square. This is more of a visual trick.) Heblem's dam set is one of the more underlooked BATs out there. The first time I saw it I knew I had to put it to good use - so I recreated one of the most impressive dams in the world, Switzerland's Contra Dam. Sydney The day overview of the Harbour city. Laying out the roads wasn't too horribly difficult - just remember that each SC4 tile is 52.5 x 52.5 feet when measuring in Google Earth while doing a recreation. The diagonal sections were tricky if only for the fact that there's not a lot of buildings to choose from. Glenni's buildings are usually my go-to here. The most challenging aspect to this picture was the highway system. As there's no elevated FARHW, it would been impossible to construct it using NAM components. I ended up getting creative, cutting off pieces of this Habour Bridge model and rendering them for use in game as modular pieces, as highlighted in this picture. It ended up working surprisingly well, though the long rendering times were a pain. My first venture into MMPing an entire urban park, Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens. ChrisAdams' paths were crucial here - I discovered that simply creating paths using the asphalt or concrete ones and surrounding it with a line of the dirt ones (or light dirt) creates a very nice layered effect. You can even use some of the smaller nbvc Rocks n' Stones to create the illusion of slightly terraced grass along the edges of the paths. The grass selection was pretty much a bunch of girafe seasonal flowers, but with some spots left barren to expose the terrain mod underneath. This had the effect of not only making the scene look less "busy" - a positive in my book, but also gave a little extra color variation. My usual strategy of using ChrisAdams brown rye/straw/light straw in various places was employed as well, for more color variation and to make it look like there was the occasional patch of dead grass. We now move on to Sydney at night. One of my favorite pictures of the year, I love how it turned out - full of energy, just like the city itself. South America Buenos Aires and it's world famous 9 de Julio Avenue + Obelisco. The textures made for the streets turned out really nice and it ended up being a gorgeous scene. Simple, small details such as illumination added to the street lights in Photoshop (inspired by the style of @MilitantRadical) can add a lot to a scene. Santos, Brazil. Whenever it's December, I always seem to visit @Bastet69008's and @elavery's great CJs to take my mind off the fact that it's 5 degrees outside and snowing. So I think it's pretty clear where the inspiration for this picture came from One last photoshopped waterfall. For a waterfall as truly epic as Iguazu Falls, I felt it certainly deserved it. Itaipu Dam was one of my bigger projects, and demonstrates the possibilities of importing sketchup models into the game - bringing to scenes to life that you thought would never be possible. I already did an extensive tutorial on the process of getting this behemoth into the game - you can check it out in the tutorials section of my last entry here. I'd also recommend getting acquainted with some of the basics of 3dsmax - a good guide on that can be found here. I normally don't like using Sketchup models to entirely create a scene (generally low quality) - but the Paramaribo house set I stumbled upon had some really excellent modeling. The building textures though weren't the best in-game, so some rain and a touch of extra grime added in after the fact really helped out. Bonus Pictures The cradle of life - Ngorongoro crater. As a whole, the spawnable flora from Xannepan's animal generators found on SC4Devotion are greatly underused. Outside of obvious choices like the African safari type scenes shown below - there's plenty of uses. Even just a couple plops of the buzzard generator over a natural habitat can help bring a scene to life. Even after making a number of wildlife related pictures in 2016, there's still many possibilities left over - something I intend to explore more this year. While I was pleased with how the Lagos scene turned out, I really wanted to make a nice grid buster scene. For Yaounde, a variety of techniques were used. For starters, I did the entire scene backwards then flipped it horizontally once I was done to give it a fresh perspective while remaining true to real life. As for the actual scene itself, the FA 22.5 and 67.5 cars included in Orange's prop pack were vital. Additional techniques were used such as slightly offsetting orthogonal buildings along the edges of FA roads and hiding the rough corners with flora. Custom content creation was extensive for this scene - not only did it require custom textures for the roads but it also marked my first serious venture into BAT, as I created the Yaounde Cathedral from scratch (although it's still very much a WIP). My first snowy city scene, Prague, required me getting creative. Essentially, my strategy was the following: since a number of the buildings in this picture were custom imported BATs, I had control in 3dsmax to give them snow textures on the roofs. Since all the other buildings didn't have snow - I pretty much copied and pasted the snow from the models that had the snow on them to the ones that didn't have any. The base textures didn't need any photoshop work as I designed the texture to be snowy from the very beginning. At the time, that strategy worked decently, but it was incredibly tedious. Since then, I've done a little experimenting and I think the best way forward would be a method such as the one used by pingpong. I would only suggest playing around with the "Selective colors" adjustment to make the whites a little more whiter. NOTE: All images on True Earth are hosted from dropbox, which seems to have more issues than other image hosts unfortunately. If you are unable to view any of the pictures in this journal thus far, I have dumped everything from 2016 into an imgur album here. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "South America + Bonus Pictures":
  28. 36 points
    korver

    Natural Wonders

    Our world is full of incredible natural wonders that keep us in awe. Today we're going to take a tour around the globe (except Antarctica - that's probably going to be a separate update down the road ) - visiting a few of the most unique and stunning natural wonders our planet has to offer. Note: this update contains a few gifs (4MB and 6MB) - it was difficult to get them any smaller. Africa Danakil Depression - Ethiopia Our first destination can be found in the hot, humid climate of northern Ethiopia. The alien like world of the Danakil Depression is known for its incredibly colorful sulfur pits - and also being the home of the hottest temperatures on earth. With temperatures reaching as high as 125 degrees, you won't be able to stay here long - just long enough to load up your camel with salt and continue on with the journey. Asia Sigiriya - Sri Lanka On the small island nation of Sri Lanka in South Asia is where you'll find our next location - the ancient rock fortress of Sigiriya. This stronghold was selected by King Kasyapa of the Ceylon civilization back in the mid 400s CE as a new capital - and it was truly ahead of its time. The original structure featured a massive city perched on top of the rock, with expansive gardens and trails leading around the entire structure. Little of it remains - but it continues to keep tourists in awe to this day. Australia Uluru (Ayers Rock) - Northern Territory When you think of Australia - one of the first things that comes to mind is its stunning Uluru (Ayers Rock), dramatically rising some 1,142 feet out of the outback. Uluru is the original aboriginal name for the area - and it has no specific meaning behind it. They believed that the rock has a great spiritual meaning - and was created at the dawn of time. To this day, those visiting it are urged not to climb the rock out of respect to these beliefs - and taking photographs of certain areas is also strongly urged against. Europe Holuhraun Lava Field - Iceland We're traveling to the Arctic for our next destination - the volatile and unpredictable Holuhraun Lava Field. This lava field is the size of Manhattan and its been growing at an unprecedented rate - and its also been spewing out a record-breaking amount of lava and sulfur dioxide in recent years. Hiking is surprisingly allowed here - but make sure you watch your step, especially with lava that can reach temperatures as high as 1,470 degrees Fahrenheit. North America Nares Strait - Canada/Greenland Border We're staying in the Arctic for our next sight - and you'll find the stunning Nares Strait located on Greenland's wild west coast. This pathway to the North Pole is lined with dramatic fjords and mountains - and with some of the most inhospitable temperatures on earth, every trip is an adventure. South America Devil's Throat (Iguazu Falls) - Brazil/Argentina Border Our tour wraps up with one of the most awe-inspiring destinations in all of South America - the majestic Devils's Throat of Iguazu Falls, located on the Brazil/Argentina border. This is a sight unlike any other on earth - water cascades from 3 different angles down nearly 300 feet of sheer rock, creating a thundering splash that can be heard for miles around. This is nature at its best - and its a destination that you won't want to miss out on. Note: a lot of these pictures required extensive custom content creation, and although it may look like it - there actually wasn't that much photoshop being used at all. The Iguazu Falls & Danakil Depression gifs are completely unedited - the in game animations were recorded using ScreenToGif. For those wondering where I got Sigiriya, it was downloaded here and imported into the game as a big BAT - some small editing was done though at the top to add things like better looking trees. Ayers Rock was made using the in game terraforming tools, but had a couple edits to the terrain mod and the clouds. As for the pics from the Arctic - the main use of photoshop was adding reflections to the water (in the Greenland pic), giving the lava a little life/making it glow a bit (the lava itself is real), and adding some mist/clouds in general as well. I created an entire set of textures for those pics - consisting of two parts. First one being just a simple terrain mod - consisting of fairly basic cliff/ground texture mods. Here's a demonstration of some of the base textures/cliff textures at work. Secondly, I also finally figured out a while back how to create overrides for the JENX terrain paints: 1, 2. And again, these aren't some sort of photoshop effect or whatever, they're just overrides of the in game terrain paints. For those interested, here's the pics completely unedited: here and here (the lava is usually supposed to be used at day, so I had to make some enhancements for the night time image.) So yeah, there's finally legit lava + glaciers in the game There's still plenty of work to be done and they don't have proper icons yet so they're sorta hard to use, so it could be a while for a release on anything. But as always, if anyone is interested in something then please PM me and I can send you what I've completed thus far. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Scenes From South America" @TekindusT Thank you! I really went all out on that Buenos Aires pic - took forever but it was worth it! @Bojci Thanks for stopping by! Appreciate the kind words @Dgmc2013 Thank you, appreciate the nice comment @tariely Thanks for the kind words! I'll try to incorporate more little tutorials and whatnot into my entries from time to time - and to show how I make them come to life. @mrsmartman Thank you! I'll hopefully try to do a few more of those in the future to show a bit of what goes into my scenes @IL. Thank you! Although I've done some very heavy photoshop pics for fun in the past, it's important to keep things in moderation. Photoshop had a minor role in the update - mainly for things like mist/clouds/rain effects, adding filters to give some of the pics to give them a unique character, and to also do a number of small cosmetic edits like adding power lines to the MMP'd poles in the Tocanao pic. All the buildings, MMPs, lots etc are real in the pics - containing a bunch of custom content I created along with creative uses of existing content. @GoKingsGo Thanks for the wonderful comment! @raynev1 Thanks for the kind words I've been thinking about it recently and I might try to fit them into some sort of prop pack along with some of the other models I've been working on. If you want them in the meantime though, feel free to PM me @Fantozzi Thanks for the nice comment As for the buildings I used in those pics, I believe I used the following: a rusty shack from Simmer2's prop pack vol3, some shacks from the fordoniak prop pack vol2, and the main buildings were from RDQ's prop pack and from Wallibuk's collection on the STEX. I used some of Maloskero's stuff too - he graciously sent me a decent amount of BATs that haven't been released yet though, so I think a few of the buildings in the pic might not be available yet. But I believe he is working currently on getting the other blds on the STEX here soon. Also, one last note - a few of the buildings I used had their roofs recolored to orange/red to give them a bit more of a South American flavor - hopefully that shouldn't be an issue though @Namiko Thanks! Yeah, that scene is hard to beat I'm gonna keep the updates coming too, I have a loooot of stuff I need to publish into updates.. @Mymyjp Thank you for the kind words! It would be great to see some more updates - I really enjoyed your work @Akallan Thanks for the comment! I've actually thought about Nordic countries, but the lack of BATs is a big issue. Especially the stave churches - I could texture one pretty good but unfortunately my modeling capabilities are lagging behind. I've found enough stuff though for Ancient Egypt so that's definitely going to happen @JP Schriefer Thanks for the nice comment as always @f3cs Thanks, glad you enjoyed it! @_Michael Thank you! I usually do big, massive scenes - so I wanted to change things up a little and do a few zoom 6 scenes like the Amazon river one, glad you liked it @dabadon5 Thank you! With each update, I really want to convey that feeling of being on a great adventure across the globe - so it's nice to hear that @RandyE Thanks for the comment Randy! It's quite amazing what we can create using the canvas of SC4 Finally, big thanks to @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @Fantozzi, @MushyMushy, @Dgmc2013, @tariely, @matias93, @Marushine, @mike_oxlong, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @Krasner, @_Michael, @bladeberkman, @Francis90b, @GoKingsGo, @raynev1, @Namiko, @mattb325, @scotttbarry, @Akallan, @JP Schriefer, @RandyE, & @APSMS for all the likes!
  29. 35 points
    Nominees - A big congratulations to the nominees for both 2015 and 2016: 89James89 Aaron Graham Adrianor apeek art128 Avanya Belfastsocrates Bipin Bloemkoli CasperVg Compdude787 CT14 Drack Dreadnought FANTA1990 GoKingsGo HippoTank IDS2 InvisiChem Magneto Manuel-ito MissVanleider nofunk raynev1 Seraf Turjan Tyberius06 UbiraJunior weixc812 Simtropolis wouldn't be the same without you all, along with everyone who is part of this community. Keep up the great work! The Second Great Llama Migration - As you've probably noticed by now, the medals are back! These have been missing since the upgrade to ST8, but today we are pleased to be reintroducing them! It's been a long process, which is why the awards ceremony has been so delayed, but we thought it was important to bring these back at the same time as the awards ceremony. Wouldn't be much of a ceremony otherwise. For those keeping count this is the second time we've migrated the llamas, and we really hope you like the new system. Awards Listing There are a couple big improvements, firstly we have an all new directory where you can browse all awards: https://community.simtropolis.com/awards/ Your awards are also found in more places now, prominently displayed on your profile, on your posts, and on the hover card for your profile! Checkout the content inside them for more details on why you won, and links to any related content. We mostly herded the llamas by hand, so if anything has gone missing, you have duplicates, or the content isn't quite right, please send an admin a message and we can fix it for you. Not all awards have been moved over yet, and there are a few that we are waiting for a better time to reintroduce (e.g. Challenge awards). Stay tuned to them coming back. If leaders of winning teams for 2015 & 2016 could please send us lists of members who need to be appropriately awarded any outstanding medals that would be appreciated. The Golden Moose - And so we are nearing the end of the ceremony, but before we go we'll pause for a brief moment to reflect on the passing of an influential member of the community. John was a kind, honest, caring, influential member of our site who dedicated hours of his time to regale us with stories, give us tech advise and inspire members young and old. His passing last year was unexpected, and it took a lot of the membership by surprise. A Nonny Moose is a name which will live on in the memory of Simtropolis, and today we want to commemorate what he brought to Simtropolis. The Moose epitomised the spirit of Simtropolis, and we want to acknowledge this through a special Trixie Award. The Golden Moose reflects the gold standard he showed when interacting with others on the site. Nonny exudes the spirit of Simtropolis, through all he did in every way, and he made this a better place just by being here. Thank you John. This now brings us to the Ceremony's conclusion. Thanks everyone for making Simtropolis such a special community to be part of. 'Till next time...
  30. 35 points
    CorinaMarie

    Cori's Rock Shoppe

    Cori's Rock Shoppe by CorinaMarie@Simtropolis A picture catalogue of every known Rock Mod for SimCity 4 Note: I did not create any of these mods. This thread is simply to display each rock mod using the same city tile for easy comparison. If you find this useful feel free to use your browser's Save As function and do a Save Complete Web Page. This will give you an offline copy with all the pictures. My content is freely available for use by anyone. You can even make a duplicate thread on any other site if you like. Please, just be sure to give me credit for the original creation. For peeps with 16:9 (or other wide screen) monitors you could open this thread in two separate windows side by side. This would allow you to have independent scroll bars to compare specific mods. It would also work if you have dual monitors tho there may be some slight color difference between the two. Other Threads in Cori's Shoppe Series: Cori's Water Shoppe (Linkys to and Pictures of every Water Mod) Cori's Beach Shoppe (Linkys to and Pictures of every Beach Mod) Cori's Terrain Shoppe (Linkys to and Pictures of every Terrain Mod) Cori's Jolteon's Tree Shoppe (Linkys to and Pictures of almost every Tree Mod) And see: C.O.R.I.M.A.P.S. - A Tutorial for SimCity 4 (Quick alternative realistic map making method) Note: If you download a mod and have any difficulty with it and when all else fails, read the ReadMe instructions that comes with it. The rest of my game is vanilla atm so the only difference between the pics is which rocks are installed. First off, here's the vanilla Maxis texture: dogfight Rock Mods (v1.0) contains 3 Calm Limestone: Dark Igneous: Dark Limestone: ENN Rock Mod Set 1 SD contains 8 Brown Granite1: Dark Granite2: Dark Granite3: Dark Granite4: Granite9: Red Igneous: Sandstone1 Brown: Sandstone1 Gray: Tropical Mossy Rock Mod: Sandy Rock Mod: Mossy Rock Mod: Grassy Rock Mod: Jeronij Maxis Rock Mod: JRJ PEG Limestone Rock Mod: Mossy Rock Mod: Grassy Rock Mod: Granite Rock Mod: Sphinx Rock mod: PEG PPOND Rock Mod: PEG ROCK MOD II Weathered Granite: PEG ROCK MOD II Eroded Sandstone: PEG ROCK MOD II Golden Sandstone: PEG ROCK MOD II Dark Basalt: PEG ROCK MOD contains 6 Craggy Sandstone: Gray Granite: Gray Rock: Limestone: Red Craggy: Sandstone: The following are HD so you will need to have Hardware Rendering or you will get CTD. ENN Rock Mod Set 2 HD (v1.0) contains 3 Granite9: Sandstone1 Brown: Sandstone1 Grey: The following are HD so you will need to have Hardware Rendering or you will get CTD. ENN Rock Mod Set 3 HD (v1.0) contains 3 Dark Granite2: Dark Granite3: Dark Granite4: The following is HD so you will need to have Hardware Rendering or you will get CTD. LK_StarterSet (v1.0): The following is HD so you will need to have Hardware Rendering or you will get CTD. Sudden Valley Terrain Mod (v1.0) SV Rock.dat only: The following is HD so you will need to have Hardware Rendering or you will get CTD. Berner Oberland Terrain Mod (v1.0) BO Rock Mod.dat only: SMP Gray Marble Rock Mod: VIP Orange Snowy rock mod (v1.0): Les Roches de l'Aubrac v 1: CPT Painted Desert Terrain Mod1 (v1.0) / CPT Painted Desert Terrain Mod CPT_C_MoabCliff.dat only: CPT OlympicTerrain Mod1 (v1.0) / CPT Olympic Terrain Mod 1 CPT_C_OlympicCliff_Optional.dat only: Columbus Terrain Mod von Cycledogg CPT_C_ColumbusCliff_Optional.dat only: Meadowshire Terrain Mod (v1.0) CPT_C_MeadowshireCliff.dat only: The following are HD so you will need to have Hardware Rendering or you will get CTD. SHK HD Rock Mods contains 5. SHK_HDRockMod_01.dat: SHK_HDRockMod_02.dat: SHK_HDRockMod_03.dat: SHK_HDRockMod_04.dat: SHK_HDRockMod_05.dat: So, when peeps ask: Which rock mod should I get?, show them this thread so they can compare and decide. Attached is the medium size city tile I've used for these pics that way you can make your own with the exact same mountain. City - Rock Mods.sc4
  31. 35 points
    korver

    South Asia

    Our journey to South Asia begins with a trip to the countryside - and the timeless rural beauty of the many tea plantations that dot the Sri Lankan countryside. The ones near Kandy are perhaps the most well-known - they've been making the famed Ceylon Tea ever since the British first colonized this area back in the 1800s. As the hillsides climb higher and higher, the strength of the tea leaves increases accordingly - making this one of the strongest teas in all of South Asia. No trip is complete without having a cup first - so make sure you make a stop over at the Ceylon Tea Museum first. The Indian Ocean is one of the most beautiful places on the planet - and it doesn't get much better than the thatched roof resorts of the Maldives. This island country south of India is world-renowned for its sunny weather, pristine beaches, and stunning resorts - from the diving, snorkeling, and windsurfing, there's always something exciting to try out. We now move into India, and our first destination is the famous Ganges River in Varanasi. This is the most sacred river to the Hindus, who make up 80% of India's population - and by cleansing in it, they wash away their sins. All sorts of religious ceremonies and festivals are held here - and for any Hindu, it's a lifelong ambition to make it here at least once. Sadly though, modern times have been tough on the river - pollution levels have reached staggering heights, and it's now one of the most polluted waterways in the world. An ambitious cleanup project is planned in the upcoming years - but little progress has been made thus far. We move north to the capital of New Delhi - where you'll find some of the most stunning buildings in all of India. Our next stop is one of the most unique structures in all of India - the Lotus Temple. This flower shaped Baha'i House of Worship has become quite a famous attraction - with over 70 million tourists visiting since it was first opened back in 1986. Under Baha'i law, all religions and faiths are welcome here - making it a popular social event place in the city. Wanting a centerpiece for his new capital, Indian king Shah Jahan had the particularly impressive Red Fort built in Delhi from 1639 - 1648, which contains a massive complex surrounded by towering red walls. This grand fort holds pavilions, offices, workshops, mansions, expansive gardens, and just about anything else a king could ever need - no wonder he inscribed the words "If there is a paradise on Earth, this is it" inside. (full size link here) Our last stop is the most iconic landmark in all of India - none other than the world famous Taj Mahal. Wanting a grand tomb for his wife, Indian emperor Shah Jahan built the Taj Mahal in Agra from 1631 - 1648 and covered it with gleaming white marble - and to this day it remains one of the most marvelous buildings on the face of the planet. Starting in 2004, tourists have been able to view it at night - making for one of the most magical experiences imaginable. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "South Asia (Preview)" @TekindusT Thanks for the kind words! @_Michael Glad you enjoyed it - thanks! @Jeffrey500 Thank you! There may be another preview coming.. so keep your eyes peeled @kelistmac Thank you @mike_oxlong Thanks for the comment! @tariely Thanks for the kind words Yeah, I paid very close attention to that on the plantation pic, glad you liked it @Akallan Thanks for the nice comment! @raynev1 Thank you, glad you liked it! @kschmidt Thanks for the comment! And good catch too, they certainly do seem to share some similarities! @Golhbul Thank you! Usually when I'm doing exotic updates like this one and others, there just won't be enough existing BATs to make it work - so sometimes I'll have to find some custom models to import into the game with 3dsmax (3d warehouse and cadnav.com are good places to start). More recently, I have been BATing various models w/ 3dsmax - I intend to do this for a number of future updates as well and I hope that I'll be able to get them to a stage where I can release some of them in some sort of pack. As for the Red Fort scene, I sorta combined both methods that I listed above - I started off with some basic models from 3d warehouse, made a number of modifications to them, and I then I made all of the various road pieces and whatnot from scratch with BAT. And finally, big thanks to @Fantozzi, @RandyE, @_Michael, @Pluispixel, @MushyMushy, @v701, @Jeffrey500, @mrsmartman, @CT14, @Yarahi, @kelistmac, @Artimus, @mike_oxlong, @Manuel-ito, @tariely, @Akallan, @raynev1, @Jolteon, @kschmidt, @nos.17, @scotttbarry, @Ducio, @bobolee, @Elenphor, & @svenson for all the likes!
  32. 35 points
    Mańkowsky

    Jaruna Islands [part 1/2]

    Ahoooy ST! First of all I'd like to apologize for my English. I understand this language very well, but there might be few harmless mistakes in my writting Today I'd like to introduce my CJ called Principality of Jantra. We'll start with not big project called Jaruna Islands. This place is little bit inspired by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ertholmene. I'm going to divide this update on 2 parts, today I'm gonna show you general shots taken on spring time. 1. It's small archipelago. Actually there are two inhabited islands: Jaruna Island (bigger one) and smaller Dziewanna Island. 2. An entrance to the harbour: 3. The strait between the islands creates a perfect natural harbor: 4. There is small but charming town called Jaruna, only 100 inhabitants: 5. Main street: 6. 7. 9. A footbridge between Islands: 10. Short stone wharf on the Dziewanna Island: 11. A little bit of nature, there are a lot of lupins and other dwarf plants: 11. Rocky wharf: 12. A lighthouse on the top hill: 13. General overview: Cheers!
  33. 34 points
    korver

    Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    Located in the middle of the Great Rift Valley, Lake Bogoria is home to one of the world's largest populations of lesser flamingos - every year millions of them migrate to it's algae infested waters. The lake boasts some of the most impressive wildlife in all of Africa - hundreds of species of birds call the lake home, and you might even see a couple zebras if you look hard enough. Geysers and hot springs dot the shoreline, creating a truly unforgettable landscape. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver
  34. 34 points
    korver

    Bohemia

    Located in the western Czech Republic, Bohemia is a region full of picturesque landscapes and charming villages. Few are as delightful as Hrensko - and its where we'll begin our tour. Founded back in the 15th century as a trading settlement on the Kamience gorge, its turned into one of the most popular tourist destinations in the area. Hrensko also serves as the entrance gate to Bohemian Switzerland National Park - but be sure to take in the village for a day or two before sailing down the Kamience gorge. The Kamience gorge cuts through the heart of the park, and riding a slow sailing boat down the river is one of the most popular tourist attractions. The steep cliffs are quite incredible, but remain quiet until our tour guide finds a rope attached to the other side and gives it a huge pull... The Umelý vodopád (artificial waterfall) comes gushing out of a small crack at the top of the rock cliff - creating quite the splash and the perfect photo opportunity. We emerge out of the gorge and start making our way through the heart of the park. After a few hours, we finally reach one of the most stunning tourist attractions in the area - the striking Pravcická brána, the largest natural sandstone arch in Central Europe. In 1826, an inn was built here and has remained a popular spot ever since - after a hard day of hiking, there's nothing better than a good meal here. Be sure to take advantage of the many paths that wrap their way around the arch to get a great view of the landscape - but remember that the top of the arch has been out of bounds since the 1980s due to heavy erosion from tourists. Our last destination in Bohemia is the impressive Pravcický kužel (Pravcický Cone) - one of the most imposing structures in the entire park. For the thrill seeker out there, its the premier destination in the entire park - but only the bravest of climbers would dare to take on these sheer cliffs in the dead of winter... During summer however, when things are a bit more manageable - rock climbers from all across Central Europe will take on the cone. For those who can scale up these challenging cliffs - hundreds of feet high with little to no room for error - they will be rewarded with some absolutely incredible views from the top. I hope you enjoyed your visit to Bohemia - its truly a timeless beauty. NOTE: In order to make this update, I really had to put my BATing skills to the test. I modeled and textured these BATs completely from scratch (1, 2, 3 - pictures taken from the Lot Editor window) specifically for the update - if anyone would like to try the models out for themselves then please PM me Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Natural Wonders" @IL. Thank you for the comment! @BC Canuck Thank you I actually hadn't heard of the Danakil Depression either until recently - but once I first saw the mesmerizing colors I knew I had to give it a go. @tariely Thank you for the kind words! Yeah, I'm planning on releasing a bunch of stuff here at some point. I'm going to be insanely busy with my CJ for a bit as I get out a lot of older updates though, so probably once things settle down. But in the meantime, if there's anything you're after in particular, feel free to send me a PM and I'll see what I can do @mattb325 Thank you for the nice words! @elavery I just checked it out - quite stunning. The cliffs and lack of proper BATs though would be a concern, but I'll think about it in the future Thanks for the suggestion. @Mymyjp Thank you, glad you liked it! @gaiskerein Thank you for the comment and kind words! @TekindusT Yep, 100% certified photoshop free Thanks for the comment And finally, big thanks to @Manuel-ito, @RandyE, @matias93, @AlexSLM520, @bladeberkman, @Brooklyn81, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @Odainsaker, @huzman, @mattb325, @scotttbarry, @nos.17, @_Michael, @Marushine, @Tonraq, @Jolteon, @Tyberius06, @jakis, @Fantozzi, @raynev1, @Elenphor, @Andrey km, @Yarahi, @bobolee, @SC4L0ver, @juliok92012, @Silur, @mayor11, @mrsmartman, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  35. 34 points
    Akallan

    Archipelago of Brebes

    Located in Southeast Asia and in the Pacific Ocean, the Archipelago of Brebes and a group of 67 islands spanning about 580 kilometers and also the country of Halruaah. The largest island is 120 kilometers long by 40 wide and is home to the capital Kawayan. The archipelago was colonized about 70,000 years ago by men, from 500 BC the archipelago became highly coveted by its resources and its strategic position, it will be the scene of numerous territorial clashes between several neighboring countries. It was in 1760 that the British Empire took power from the archipelago and added a new colony to its list. Two centuries later, the local population revolted, and demanded its independence. After the Second World War, the United Kingdom can not preserve its authority against revolt because it demands too much military and financial means, it folds and the independence of the country will be officially signed on June 6, 1953. The civil war will cost the life of 150,000 citizens. Today, the archipelago of Brebes has just over 15 million inhabitants, the majority of which are concentrated in Kawayan. The poverty line decreases ant the unemployment rate of 11.2% of the active population. The country's main economy comes from tourism, oil and copper. Have a nice trip! Kawayan, the largest city and capital of the country. The population reaches 9'000'000 in 2016 and demographers estimate that the city is reaching 10'000'000 inhabitants in about twenty years. The city is contrasted by poor neighborhoods, other neighborhoods rise with large buildings blending British architecture in the modern Asian and Australian era. There are a multitude of small villages like this spread over the entire archipelago. Most of these villages depend on fishing and agriculture, for some of them tourism operates the local economy. One of the four airfields in the country. Built in 1940 during the Second World War, it served the British Army for military operations on the islands neighboring archipelago. The aerodrome has been classified as one of the worst in the world by an aeronautical review because of its delicate position between the ocean and the cliffs, the pilots have courage ... There have already happened a few accidents, but never anything serious. An old colonial house of the British Empire isolated from everything. In the archipelago still lives some indigenous tribes they live mainly of the fishing. There are about 1,700 natives scattered over several islands. After the war, the country developed to the detriment of the natives. One of the few stream in the whole archipelago. The Hainia Atoll. It takes millions of years for an atoll to form: at first it is a volcano to which coral is formed around it in shallow and warm waters. The volcano collapses until it disappears completely leaving behind only a coral reef in the form of a ring. This process takes several million years. In 2006, a man was found on an island in the archipelago, surviving for a dozen years before a fisherman's boat noticed an unusual activity on the island. The man had made a huge fire and kept it up for several days before anyone noticed his presence. He says he had a great holiday! Thank you Silur. Thank you. No, I was not inspired by this CJ, although it is very beautiful. Thanks Michael, the next update will be in a long time. As soon I will not have much time to dedicate to SC4, and also I want to prepare something huge that will take me a lot of time. Why not! Thank you for the comment! Thank you, I enjoyed doing this little aerodrome. I'm glad to hear it, thank you very much. Yes why not. Thank you GoKingsGo! Thank you very much tariely!
  36. 34 points
    rivit

    Show Us What You're Working On

    Experiments in Road Textures and T21s - Untouched snapshot, no MMPS in this scene.
  37. 34 points
    SimCoug

    The Great Debate

    Update 48 The Great Debate Fall 1884 Previously on New SorGun… With time ticking away, Eastman T. Finch realized he needed to do something before Kitty Timworthy walked away with the election. In an attempt to cut through the lies and gossip being spread around town by Kitty’s associates, Finch proposed a debate between the two candidates. Kitty readily agreed, hoping to bury Finch for good. Mayor Walker agreed to moderate… “Ladies and gentlemen… Ladies and Gentlemen,” Mayor Walker roared, attempting to quiet the huge crowd. Finally, the debate had begun. Finch knew the election would hinge on his performance this day, and he had to be nothing but perfect. The format allowed for the first candidate to speak for an hour, the second candidate would respond for ninety minutes, and then the first candidate would be able to finish with a 30 minute rejoinder (the same format was used for the famous Lincoln/Douglas debates of 1858). Finch squeezed his hands tight – he could feel the sweat of his palms. The businessman wasn’t new to public speaking, but the size of the crowd and the importance of the event would unease anyone. Always the gentlemen, Finch insisted that Mrs. Kitty Timworthy be afforded the first chance to speak, which she cordially accepted. It was not unusual for women to speak publicly in those days, especially on the frontier, where gender roles were more relaxed. But a political debate between a man and women was less common, and one with a mayoral election in the balance was almost unheard of. The buzz of excitement among the crowd was electric as Kitty began her speech. “Fellow citizens of New SorGun,” Kitty began. “I am honored to be speaking to you today as a candidate for the mayoral office of this great town. Only a few years ago, such a scenario would have been thought impossible. But I stand before you today not only as a woman, but as a populist and a champion of reform.” The crowd roared with approval. “For too long, the businessmen and their allies have dictated policy in this town, and for too long those policies have benefited the few, while enriching their own enterprises. They continue to promise growth and prosperity for all, but I have not seen the realization of these assurances. Have you?” Murmurs of disapproval could be heard shouted by the onlookers. “No… nor I, my friends. In fact, businesses are being shuttered and a recession is smothering the life out of us,” Kitty bellowed in disapproval. “It wasn’t supposed to be this way,” Kitty continued. “Almost a year ago, the golden spike was driven into the ground in Montana. The Northern Pacific Railroad now spreads across the continent. Our leaders promised a new era of wealth and prosperity… “ Kitty paused. “More promises…” Kitty groaned sarcastically and the crowd joined in with a good laugh. Mrs. Timworthy continued her assault on the failed leadership of the current administration. The crowd was energized and laughing and booing at every cue. Kitty was well practiced, as she had been replaying the same notes all across town while stumping for her candidacy over the previous months. She spoke directly to her base, the laborers and women who were demanding jobs and an end to vice and corruption. Kitty’s hour came to an end, and Eastman T. Finch was given the stage. As he walked toward the center, the crowd responded with some polite applause and a few heckles. Finch looked out over the large gathering and cleared his throat. “I know many of you gathered here today think unkindly of me. Some of the things you have heard, read or experienced have influenced an unflattering opinion of myself… whether warranted or not. I don’t expect to change any opinions rooted in hate, but I do hope my words can reach those of you who still hold an open heart.” Finch paused, and continued. “Like almost everyone here, New SorGun is my home, although not by birth. Like you, this town became my home the day I set foot on Yarahi’s wharf. I still remember that day, as clear as the natural Denenny spring that has provided our towns water since the days of the first settlers. “And like you, on that day I became part of not just a town, but a family of like-minded men and women. Like all families, we have had our differences, but despite them we forge ahead and have achieved great feats. Who here remembers the town coming together and raising the first New SorGun school house? It still sits behind me, not too far from this very stage. And how could we forget the dastardly actions of the Northern Pacific Railroad? While the nay-sayers were writing off our town, we pulled together and built our own railroad!” Finch finished with a shout, and many in the crowd whistled in approval. Finch waited until the cheers abated. “Together we have built this small town into a leading force in the region, one that even the railroad barons cannot ignore. Through industry and trade, New SorGun is the envy of the northwest and we continue to lead the way. The new school house next to Denenny Creek only cements our commitment to educating our citizens and building a community that will endure.” “And each new factory that springs up along our wharf means new jobs and financial stability.” Eastman continued to outline the progress that New SorGun has witnessed over the past few years. As his time allotment wound down he paused and looked out over the crowd. “Now, some believe all of our accomplishments bear an unacceptable cost. Businessmen and industrialist are hoarding untold mountains of cash earned at the expense of you, the working men of this great town. Certainly, I have been accused of such dastardly behavior,” Finch paused while a few murmurs and shouts in the crowd burst out. Finch raised his hand while the shouts subsided. “It is true; I have managed to build a considerable amount of wealth here in New SorGun. Deservedly or not, that is a question could be debated until the end of time. Does the lumberjack working an additional day deserve his extra dollar and a quarter?” The rustle of mixed emotions could be heard from the crowd. “Or the barkeep who stays open late to service the late night patrons, is his time and extra energy not worth a dime?” continued Finch. “hard work, extraordinary effort, uncanny persistence… these qualities have built up this great nation and we continue to thrive because we are rewarded for such endeavors. Our home, this blessed town is no different. New SorGun stands here today because we’ve given our sweat and blood to make it happen. “ Many in the crowd cheered as Finch paused, while others still offered their obligatory boos of disapproval. “Yes, it is true, I am a rich man. I’ve earned great riches while living here in New SorGun. Some would dismiss it as luck, while others may give a nod to hard labor and industry. My aching hands and tired back remind me where I stand on that debate. But let there be no debate about this…” Finch finished the last sentence with a bellow so loud even the deaf man near the back of the crowd could feel the energy. “I would spend every last penny, use every last muscle and give every last breath I have to keep New SorGun alive. New SorGun is my home, and I will protect her like a father. So long as I stand before you, by the grace of God, our town will not perish from this land,” Finch’s fist pounded the podium with a thunderous crack after his last word. The crowd remained uncharacteristically quiet for a while. Anthony Myers began to clap, and he was quickly joined by others, until finally a raucous crowd was hollering in approval. Even the dissenters were quiet for a while. Finch began walking from the stage while acknowledging the audience. Mr. Myers caught his attention as he neared the edge and gave him a little nod of approval. Eastman Finch had given the town a rousing speech for sure, but would it be enough to win the Mayor’s office? Stay tuned.
  38. 33 points
    korver

    Roman Empire (Pt. 1/3)

    For the next three updates we'll be taking a look at one of the world's greatest civilizations - the Roman Empire. We'll take a look at the humble beginnings, rise to power, and eventual downfall of this incredible empire - and all the major events along the way. Our look back into the past begins in 753 BCE - and Rome, the eventual capital of the empire, is founded on Palatine Hill by Romulus. It's still the Iron Age - and the only structures you'll find here are thatched roof huts. It may not look like much right now - but soon, the city will start to take shape. By 509 BCE, major changes are starting to take place in Rome. The last king has been expelled, which marks the beginning of the Roman Republic. Rome now has a constitution and a Republican government - and some of its first grand structures are starting to be built on Capitoline Hill, such as the Temple of Jupiter. As the Republic starts to expand - its clear that having appropriate infrastructure to keep up will be vital. Some of the first aqueducts are built around 312 BCE, providing much needed water to some of the Republic's most important cities. While the empire is growing rapidly - its also attracting the attention of outside invaders. The Carthaginian leader Hannibal and his troops wanted a piece of the Republic - but an invasion from the south (modern day Tunisia) would be too predictable and would be easily countered. Ingeniously, he led his troops (and an entire herd of elephants!) north into Iberia and across the Alps - on route to Italy in a surprise sneak attack. While Hannibal achieves his goal of making it into Italy without facing the Roman navy or land garrisons - his next big challenge will be trying to defeat a much larger Roman army at the Battle of Cannae. Despite being outnumbered, he uses brilliant military tactics to take down the Romans and secure a crucial victory, one that causes the Romans to fear him for years to come. Even to this day, Hannibal is widely regarded as one of the greatest military leaders of all time. Despite a couple defeats, the Roman Republic continues to move forward and prosper. Rome is expanding greatly - and a number of magnificent structures are beginning to be built. In 46 BCE the Forum of Caesar is built for Julius Caesar - and serves as a meeting place for the Senate. Rome's power is continuing to grow - and we'll be taking an depth look at the height of Rome in the next update. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver Note: For these Roman Empire updates (and others) - many of the special objects you see here like the buildings and people were models I downloaded from 3d warehouse. Stuff from the STEX and a few of my own creations were used also though. Here's a pic of about everything I exported - I even went so far to make soldier MMPs for these updates. I used 3dsmax to export them as BATs (models) for the game - I then turned them into various props and MMPs, they are just like anything else you would use. --- Previous Update: "Ancient Egypt" Thanks to @mike_oxlong, @CorinaMarie, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @RobertLM78, @Odainsaker, @Dreadnought, @bladeberkman, @Prophet42, @Toby Ferrian, @The British Sausage, @Krisman, @mrsmartman, @RandyE, @nRVOUS, @Akallan, @SC4L0ver, @kschmidt, @_Michael, @Maloskero, @Tonraq, @Marushine, @scotttbarry, @raynev1, @Manuel-ito, @Elenphor, @Edvarz, @Krasner, & @nos.17 for the likes & reactions!
  39. 33 points
    korver

    The Amazon

    Our journey through the Amazon starts off in Manaus, located on the Rio Negro in the heart of the rain forest. It's one of the largest cities in the Amazon - despite it's remote location, it's well worth the visit. We take a stroll down many of it's historic roads, enjoying some of the architecture - the best example being it's beautiful ornate opera house. The Amazon Theatre was constructed back in 1896, back when the surrounding region was flourishing from the rubber trade. Lots has changed since then, and unfortunately we'll meet some of the harsh realities quickly.. After our visit in Manaus, we board our boat and begin traveling north through the rain forest. Unfortunately, it'll take quite some time before we actually get to see the untamed forest, as deforestation has cleared out much of the land. Once pristine sections of rain forest have been replaced by the signature "fishbone" pattern for as far as the eye can see. The need for cattle ranching and crops means that many will do just about anything for more land, including slashing and burning whole sections in one go. Although the rate of deforestation has dropped in recent years, it can't change the fact that nearly 20 percent of the forest has been destroyed over the last 40 years alone. Our journey continues northwards, and we move from the Rio Negro to one of it's smaller tributaries, the Rio Demini. As the river undulates and curves it's way gently through the rain forest, we finally get our first true taste of the Amazon. We get a chance to observe some of the surrounding wildlife - a pair of jaguars being the clear highlight of the day. Once we reach the small fishing village of Lisbão, we get a chance to meet the locals and stock up on supplies as we continue on deeper into the rain forest. The river gets narrower and narrower the further we go along - and it leaves us less room for error as we continue our travels. Once we finally reach some rapids, the only way to continue onward is by foot. We were told that the local Yanomami people inhabit these lands - but after many days hiking through the deep forest, we thought we would never see them. Finally, right at the Venezuela/Brazil border, we catch a smoke cloud far off in the corner of our eyes. As we move closer, sure enough we see the roof of a shabono (their circular huts) peeking over the canopy of the forest - we've finally found found them. As we move closer to greet them, the situation quickly turns murky as they take out their bow and arrow. They've never seen outsiders before, and not knowing if we're friend or foe - they threaten to shoot. To dispel the situation, we offer a pair of matches and they cautiously accept the gift. After learning how they work, they put down their weapons - we've finally gained their respect. After hiking for weeks from small village to small village, we finally reach one with a small airport. They're offering plane rides over Angel Falls - an offer we can't refuse. The ride takes us over a number of tepuis in the Guiana Highlands - stunning for sure, but they won't compare to what we see next. We finally reach the falls a couple hours later - getting about as close as you can possibly get by plane. At over 3,200 feet tall, the world's tallest waterfall doesn't disappoint - it's truly an extraordinary view. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! Thanks -korver --- Replies for "Scenes From Africa":
  40. 33 points
    korver

    Tour of Africa: Johannesburg

    Our Tour of Africa begins with one of Africa's most iconic cities - Johannesburg. With nearly 4 million people in its metropolitan area - this is South Africa's largest city, and has one of the best skylines in all of Africa. With a unique combination of various architecture styles and plenty of famous landmarks to boot - there's plenty to do and see here. The famous Orlando Power Station was in use for nearly 50 years - but since the late 90s, its been transformed into a tourist center, with colorful murals painted on its walls and base jumping becoming a popular activity. To make it into the city itself, one of the most traveled routes is over the Nelson Mandela Bridge - completed in 2003, its one of the most iconic landmarks in the city. Construction of the bridge was quite tricky, as it directly runs over 43 different rail lines - but construction was completed without disrupting any of them, and its been a popular tourist attraction ever since. At night, this bridge turns into a spectacle - for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the bridge's lighting system was upgraded extensively, and a new rainbow colored scheme was installed. If you can make it here at night - the striking color show will certainly be worth it. We've made it into the CBD - and there's no better time to see the city than during a beautiful South African sunset. Despite a little fog and rain - the landmarks here are still quite stunning, like the Carlton Centre. Completed in 1973, its been the tallest office building in Africa ever since. At night is when the city really begins to come alive, however. The streets of Johannesburg are typical of any other African metropolis - there's people and cars filling every last inch of pavement. It may be chaotic, but the life and energy of these streets makes visiting this city a special experience. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Introduction" Thanks to @Namiko, @GoKingsGo, @Yarahi, @Tonraq, @juliok92012, @AlexSLM520, @RandyE, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @scotttbarry, @nos.17, @mattb325, @matias93, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Marushine, @_Michael, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, & @Toby Ferrian for all the likes!
  41. 33 points
    korver

    Ancient Ruins

    Note: I ended up doing more scenes than I was expecting, so it ended up being too big for one update - there will be a part 2 of this update coming out soon. Our tour of some of the world's most impressive ancient ruins begins with Mayans and one of their most famous sites - the ruined city of Chichén Itzá. From approximately 550 CE - 800 CE, the entire city remained an important ceremonial site - but it was eventually captured by the rival Toltecs in 987 CE. The Toltecs added their own structures and temples to the complex, until it was ultimately abandoned for mysterious reasons in roughly 1180 CE. While much of the city is long gone, there's still many sites worth checking out, such as the Plaza of a Thousand Columns and the Pyramid of Kukulkan. It's one of the most stunning destinations in all of Central America - and an experience you won't forget. We make our way towards the Caribbean Sea to explore another one of the Mayan civilization's most famous sites - Tulum. Between the stunning ruins, pristine beaches, and picturesque views of the Caribbean - its one of the most incredible landmarks in the area. Rain or shine, its a destination that's hard to top and certainly worth checking out. While the Mayans were certainly one of the most important civilizations in all of Mesoamerica - another influential site in the area predates anything they built by hundreds of years. The ancient ruins of Teotihuacan are just as mysterious as they are awe-inspiring. Who built it, and when? Although many are divided on the subject, its believed that either the Toltecs or Totonacs built it, back in the 3rd century CE - and it quickly developed into one of the world's largest cities. The Aztecs of Central Mexico incorporated the site into their own civilization nearly a thousand years later, and it eventually became one of their most important religious and economic sites. Today, the entire complex remains a premier tourist destination right outside of Mexico City - and the Pyramid of the Sun is a can't miss attraction. Africa is where you'll find our next famous archeological site - the ruined, walled city of Great Zimbabwe. Founded back in the 11th century CE, the Shona people built these stunning buildings as a royal palace for their kingdom of Zimbabwe - in fact, the very name "Zimbabwe" meant "stone houses" in their language. The whole area remained an important trading area for centuries, but was ultimately abandoned in the 1450s - and no one is completely sure why. We now move into South America - and the first stop is the ancient city of Tiahuanaco, located high in the Bolivian Andes. The Tiwanaku civilization flourished here from 100 CE to 1250 CE - and they were one of the most powerful civilizations in the entire region. Noted for their architecture, roads, sculptures, and other advanced cultural aspects - they were the precursor to the Incas and played a major role in how they designed many of their structures. Today, all that remains of this once great structure is a few gates, statues, and walls - but you can still tell that this was a civilization that was far ahead of their time. Our last archaeological site is one of the premier destinations in all of South America - the Incan Citadel of Machu Picchu. This legendary site was believed to have been built back in 1450 CE, around the height of the Incan empire. For the next 100 years or so, it remained a sacred religious site for Incan leaders - and it's also believed to have been a royal estate for some of the most important rulers of the time. Despite its grandeur, this ancient city couldn't last forever - in the mid 1500s, the city was mysteriously abandoned, right around the time Spanish conquistadors made their way into the area. While there's no evidence the two ever interacted - its certainly possible that a smallpox outbreak could have wiped out the entire city. For nearly 400 years, the entire site laid in ruin, with nature overtaking its walls - until American archeologist Hiram Bingham discovered the site in 1911, with renovations soon underway. It may be tough to find on a map and even tougher to reach on foot - but for those who make a trip, its a once in a lifetime destination. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Ancient Ruins (Preview)" @Silur Thanks as always Silur @mike_oxlong Thanks for the ongoing support, I appreciate it @JP Schriefer Thank you! I actually ended up doing so many that there will have to be a part II, so stay tuned.. @Ducio Thanks for the comment! Haha, that sounds like a great idea too @kschmidt Thanks for the comment! I hope my reply shed a little light on what that unusual structure was And finally, big thanks to @CT14, @MushyMushy, @scotttbarry, @RandyE, @Fantozzi, @Jolteon, @_Michael, @tonyr, @mrsmartman, @Manuel-ito, @kingofsimcity, @juliok92012, @Odainsaker, @JP Schriefer, @mattb325, @Elenphor, @Ducio, @kschmidt, @Dgmc2013, @bobolee, & @Pluispixel for all the likes!
  42. 33 points
    Simmer2

    Show Us What You're Working On

    Well this is the last dump of pics I'm going to post on this lot. Hopefully soon you will see it, up close in your cities... Pay attention and you will see even more props and scenes never seen before. So make sure your seat belt is on and your table is in the upright position.... RH30 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Simmer2/Nick
  43. 33 points
    pcwhiz24

    SimCity Art (SimArt)

    Welcome to my SimArt journal! I decided to put all my city art together into one journal, so I can have them all in one place! This journal will have mostly SimCity-related art, (or just regular cities), and possibly some sneak peaks of future CJ updates (Million Sims challenge anyone?) A little background: I've been drawing cities since 6th grade (2008). My first City building game ever was SimCity Societies late 2007, (which was fun) and then I got SimCity 4 for the first time months later and got hooked to it. I was let down by the lack of 3D at first, but I accepted it since the game was so fun. It became my go-to game for a long time. Around 2008, I started googling SimCity 5, and I would wonder if it would ever come out. I decided to draw my idea of what I wanted "SimCity 5" to look like. A lot of the drawings were done while I was at school bored or during free time. I've been drawing cities even until this day. I was all to familiar with the phrase "Put that drawing away" I got from teachers! Anyhow, without any further ado, Let's get started! I will save my most recent art for last (on the bottom). The top of the drawings contain the title and the bottom is the description/meaning. For most of my older middle/High-school drawings, I wrote what I feel they mean to me now and what they symbolize. First drawing: Blue Republic City: Main Street South (Commercial District) (Partial, will show the rest next update!) (Completed in November 2013; Senior Year of HS) SimCity 4 in 3D; Two MAVE-6's intersecting, note some of the Maxis CO$$$ buildings, and a R$$ on the right City From above Started in late 2011, beginning of my sophomore year of HS (10th grade). With only 4 blocks complete, it was put away in a pile of papers for over 6 MONTHS before I dug it out when I was throwing away other papers. Have I not found this, this drawing would've been thrown away too. It was finished just before my sophomore year in May 2012. Highway From Hell RHW-6C highway that leads to Woodland City Completed May 2013, this drawing took about two days to complete; The majority of it was worked on in my pre-calculus class (which I was failing miserably). My junior year was my worst year in all my 12 grades of school. This drawing symbolizes my "Junioritis." The storm represents my finals that I would still face before the end of that year (in June) and the city out in the distance represents summer. The clear towards the end represents the light at the end of the hell that I call, my Junior Year. The exit you see to the right (Exit 255) represents a break. Speaking of Storms... Here Comes my finals! I had to take the exit to the right of the previous scene (Highway From Boredom) to brace for the violent thunderstorm. The conditions became way too dangerous to drive through. I made it out, thankfully: Elm Street; Completion date around 2013 More Art! I dubbed this one: Good After-School! (Get it? 'Cause it's the afternoon and...school..*laughs awkwardly at silence*) Completed my sophomore year of HS (Early 2012); Represents students walking home from school after dismissal. We travel back in time! Some random house I drew in 7th grade Completed in 7th grade (January 2009) This drawing symbolizes...some random house. Generic Neighborhood From Above Completed March 2010 (8th grade), note the massive wreck just by the hospital, which symbolizes the only time that I would EVER got in trouble and written up in middle school, for the most ridiculous reason ever. Hence why the hospital is right there, to symbolize the ridiculousness of the whole situation. A SPRING SERIES OF 8TH GRADE DRAWINGS Highway To High School Similar concept to "Highway from boredom," except that things are much happier Completed in April, 2010, towards the end of my 8th grade year and also the end of middle school road! The late afternoon setting symbolizes the fact that I am in my last few months of my middle school career. The storm clouds out towards the right however suggest that there are still obstacles to face before the end of my middle school career. There overpass out in the distance is the FCAT test. The rush hour traffic symbolizes all the graduates who would soon walk the stage, marching along... Now I go under the overpass from the previous drawing, symbolizing that I have passed my FCAT (2009) Same highway from above, just further along the road, and a bit later I finally reach the Cloverleaf (in the distance) Completed in late May 2010, the last full month of my 8th grade year, the traffic is heavy with graduates. The cloverleaf (it's still far, I know it's hard to see lol) symbolizes the different directions people will take in their lives from here. Some will go to other schools that are not in their zone, and others will keep going to the high school they're called for. Some friendships will end here. The late evening setting symbolizes the setting of my middle school, and the few hours left in that day, just as my days as an 8th grader, are numbered, soon to end. The highway past the clover leaf represents a new chapter in life. -------------------------------------------------------------- Fast Forward To High School Senioritropolis Completed May 2014 my Senior year of High School; Senioritropolis. What does it symbolize? Here are the pieces: Seniorit-tropol-is. You put it together, I think it speaks for itself (Still don't get it? Take "Tropol" away) SimCity 4 3D Concept Art (from 2013) More SC4 3D Concept Art Now for the Most Recent SimArt Oh yeah, and one thing I need to mention... After Playing SC4 for almost 24 hours straight, I went to go take a shower and as I looked over to the living room I saw this... Yes, if you play SC4 with the 3D Mod for too long...this happens. The bathroom is to the left, parent's bedroom to the right, the side door is right towards the end, and my front door is to the right of where the right wall ends. To the left of the left wall is the dining room, which leads to the kitchen and back door. My parents definitely not happy when they saw over 500K tiny sims blocking any way out of the house with their metropolis. Note: If you want 3D SC4 graphics, download the latest version of SC4 3D Camera mod (April Fool's Edition) Disclaimer This is known to be duly noted that I am not responsible for any power outages, crashes, the destruction of your computer, or the Sims-colonization of your living room. Please download at your own risk Before I get to my latest drawing, let us go back to 6th grade one last time (At least for this update)... Blue Republic City: Main Road North (2008) Completed in May 2008, this was my last drawing as a 6th grader. It is the same city as the first drawing in this entry. Blue republic City is a young, growing city. It is the future capital of the Blue Republic senate and Capital. (more to come in future CJ) 8 Years Later... Blue Republic City: Main Road North (2016) Yes, this is the exact same scene and angle as the previous drawing, except 8 years have passed. The buildings under construction were complete, and the AVE-4 was widened into an MAVE-6. I wanted to see how much I improved since 6th grade, so I went and re-drew one of my old middle-school drawings (kind of like re-mastering a ps1 game with modern ps4 graphics) with my modern technique. You can see the difference 8 years makes! Practice makes perfect! That's it for this update, I hope y'all enjoyed it and don't worry, there is more to come. Much more! I post a lot of my art/works in progress on Instagram too. Mods, am I allowed to post a link to my Instagram account here? Thanks!
  44. 33 points
    weixc812

    Show us your Downtown / CBD

    Now I'm honored to present you the final version of downtown Coos Bay! And you may be interested in the skyline view from far away. And here's function distribution map for this CBD And here's a commercial plan about one building under construction And this height map clearly indicates the height control effort adopted to this moderate height CBD. I'd give special thanks to the great BATters in SC4 community, to name a few, Reddonquixote, scotty222, PBGV103, jasoncw, Darknono35, kellydale2003, DmScopio, darn42, girafe, on001222... So far I'm quite satisfied with the result but I'll still hang around and make possible improvement for this CBD, so any suggestion is appreciated in whatever means.
  45. 32 points
    korver

    Ancient Egypt

    Today, we're traveling back to 2500 BCE to Ancient Egypt to take a look some of the greatest man made wonders of all time, along with some of the stunning surrounding landscape. We begin with the The Great Sphinx of Giza - the most recognizable statue of Ancient Egypt - and even to this day, it remains one of the world's most famous statues. It features a lion's body with the head of an Egyptian king - and was carved of out limestone most likely during the reign of King Khafre (2558-2532 BCE). The Nile River was truly vital to Ancient Egypt in a number of ways - not just for crops and irrigation, but for also allowing ships to sail from city to city. Small docks like this one lined the edge of the river. The land surrounding the Nile River was nutrient rich, and had excellent farming conditions. The ancient Egyptians called the soil "The Gift of the Nile" - and a variety of crops could be planted such as wheat, figs, barley, melons, and figs. We move on to the pyramids - it took three generations to complete this complex, and it was well worth the wait. Despite their condition today - the pyramids were once coated in polished white limestone - one of the most incredible sights imaginable. Each pyramid has a series of chambers underneath - and are believed to be tombs for their namesakes. The Pyramid of Khufu - also known as the Great Pyramid of Giza - was the largest of these pyramids. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to still remain to this day. The Pyramid of Khafre is the second largest of the Pyramids (although it might look taller due the fact it's on a higher elevation) - but has a much more elaborate complex of chambers and was also once connected to the Sphinx by a walkway. The Pyramid of Menkaure was the smallest of the three - to set it apart and to give it a unique look, the lower portion is encased in granite. Finally, some overviews of the entire area. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver - - - Big thanks to @tariely, @redfox85, @RandyE, @RobertLM78, @raynev1, @mrsmartman, @Dreadnought, @CorinaMarie, @Toby Ferrian, @feyss, @The British Sausage, @Akallan, @Elenphor, @bladeberkman, @bobolee, & @SC4L0ver for the likes on the preview!
  46. 32 points
    korver

    Paris (Pt. 2/3)

    Our tour picks back up with a trip to La Madeleine - one of the city's most recognizable churches. Originally designed as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army - its Greek style sets it apart from the rest. Since its completion in 1842, it's been one of the most popular attractions in the city. The Odéon-Théâtre de l'Europe is one of the most beautiful theaters in the city and one of France's six national theaters. The Palais Garnier is one of Paris' most grand opera houses - opened in 1875, it's a true masterpiece. The next stop is one of Paris' most unique landmarks - the Centre Pompidou. Completed in 1977, this enormous colored building is covered in a maze of pipes going in every direction - and has housed a popular art museum ever since. (Animation might take a little bit to completely load) Our last stop today is one of the world's most famous landmarks - the Eiffel Tower. Completed in 1889 for the Universal Exposition to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution - this 986 foot tall tower became the world's tallest freestanding structure for over 40 years. It's remained an icon of Paris and France ever since. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Paris (Pt. 1/3)" Big thanks to @kingofsimcity, @_Michael, @scotttbarry, @RobertLM78, @huzman, @RandyE, @Toby Ferrian, @Manuel-ito, @Talla 2XLC, @CorinaMarie, @Silur, @redfox85, @Tyberius06, @Andrey km, @bobolee, @MushyMushy, @The British Sausage, @mrsmartman, @matias93, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Mr Saturn64, @Angry Mozart, @Girafe, @jakis, @feyss, @martijn.1, @Transport, & @Elenphor for all the likes!
  47. 32 points
    korver

    Scenes From South America

    Our journey to South America begins in Baños, Ecuador - located in the Eastern Andes, this popular tourist resort town offers lots to do. From restaurants, hot springs, waterfalls, and plenty of other activities to keep you occupied - its an excellent destination for anyone wanting to get a taste of the region. We won't be staying here long though, as the neighboring Amazon awaits.. While Baños may be located in the Andes Mountains - it's also known as the "Gateway to the Amazon" due to its close proximity to many of the Amazon River's tributaries and streams, offering a direct route into the jungle itself. We rent a boat from one of the locals, and we're soon on our way - into the dense, humid climate of the Amazon rainforest.. We travel deeper into the Amazon, and it might be hundreds of miles before we reach the next town or village. The locals here live simple lives - while some are tucked away so deep into the forest that they haven't been reached yet by civilization - others live on the shores of the Amazon and its tributaries with limited contact. We get a chance to meet a group of them, high up on their stilt houses - the brief glimpse into their lives and customary rituals is quite fascinating. In this part of South America - much of the local economy depends on important natural resources such as oil to keep afloat. Lake Maracaibo, located in northern Venezuela, has been vital for the locals - outside of the Middle East, this is one of the world's largest oil producers since oil was first discovered here back in 1914. Much of the land surrounding the lake is surrounded by endless fields of oil pumpjacks - they've quickly become a common symbol of the region. We head back into Brazil and the next stop will be a common sight in many of the major cities. From São Paulo to Rio de Janeiro - favelas dot the outskirts and creep up along the mountainous hillsides. The people here might not have a lot - but they make the best of their situation for them and their families, creating makeshift houses from whatever they can find. Some 1,000 miles west is where you'll find our next destination - one of South America's greatest cities, Buenos Aires. The mighty obelisco rises some 221 feet above the surrounding Plaza de la República and the spaciously wide 9 de Julio Avenue - commemorating the founding of the city back in 1536, its one of the main landmarks in the city and one of its premier destinations. Our final destination takes us back to the Andes - and although much of the land here is inhospitable and harsh, there's still a number of small, charming villages and towns that you'll want to check out. The small village of Tocanao in Chile stands on the edge of the Atacama Desert - despite the lack of rain (this is the driest area on the face of the planet) - the people here have adapted quite well, making the most of a few small streams that run close by. The bell tower here dates from 1750 - built from volcanic stone, its a unique landmark that's quite striking. Note: For this update (and others) - custom content creation has been vital. I've been creating custom road texture sets (this is only a small portion of it - there's about 20 or so for the Banos pic), BATing various small buildings from scratch (1, 2,), making HD water textures, and much more. I don't know if any of this stuff will make it to the exchange soon as there isn't any documentation, a number of small things still need to be fixed/improved, and I've also been extremely busy with my CJ lately. In the meantime though, if anyone is interested in these then just send me a PM. Additionally, about the last update - the obscure BATs were not photoshopped in (that would be waay too much photoshop in my book) - they're all ingame BATs I got from 3d warehouse. The Petra pic used a bit more photoshop than usual - I made it a long time ago when I was still messing around with PS - but the pic still uses an ingame BAT from 3d warehouse with some extra effects around it (added lights, made the cliffs look better.) Anyways, if I'm doing a scene and I need something from 3d warehouse, I'll import it into 3dsmax, render it, and use it as a prop in my scene. They are like any other BAT you would use. I already wrote a number of moderately in-depth guides on this in my other "South America" update here - I might consider doing this again (more in depth) if there's enough interest. Also, all of my scenes with the crazy road textures are really just a big flat prop (ingame props, not some sort of crazy photoshop effect. That would be an excessive amount of photoshop in my book). I'll make a big texture, place it on the prop in 3dsmax, render it, and use that prop in Lot Editor. So it isn't some sort of post processing effect, these are ingame props, no different than any other prop you would use. I already made a guide on this here in my "Year in Review" entry (the Pisa picture) so feel free to check it out. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: Ancient Ruins - Pt. II Big thanks hanks to @Fantozzi, @kingofsimcity, @RandyE, @_Michael, @MushyMushy, @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Yarahi, @mrsmartman, @mike_oxlong, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @tariely, @raynev1, @Dgmc2013, @GoKingsGo, @Ducio, @Namiko, @Akallan, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @Bastet69008, @schokoladeneis 1, @mattb325, @Elenphor, @Krasner, @juliok92012, @JP Schriefer, @Don_Pato, & @sucram17 for all the likes!
  48. 32 points
    korver

    Ancient Ruins - Pt. II

    For the second part of our tour, we begin by traveling to the Middle East to take a look at one of the world's most unique set of ruins - Petra. Founded by the Nabataean civilization as early as 312 BCE, this ancient sandstone city flourished for centuries - and the construction of the Treasury in the 1st century CE was a time of considerable growth and prosperity for the civilization. By 106 CE the Roman Empire captured the city - while Roman influence can be seen throughout the complex, they still thrived as a trade center for many more centuries. Eventually though, the Romans moved their trade capital from Petra and the entire city faded into obscurity and was abandoned shortly afterwards. The ruins have remained a mysterious landmark since then - in fact, the whole facade of the Treasury is riddled with bullet holes after Bedouin tribesmen tried to break in, hoping to recover riches inside. To this day, the entire complex remains a popular tourist attraction in the area - be sure to visit at night when the entire complex is lit up by a stunning display of candles - its one of the most magical experiences imaginable. For our next iconic ancient ruin - we're traveling to the rural farmlands of southern England. Stonehenge was built between 3200 and 2000 BCE - making it by far the oldest ruin on our list. The druids who built this megalith used ingenious methods to move these rocks around - and although its not entirely agreed upon, most believe that some sort of earth ramp was used to lift the stones into perfect position. There's no better time to visit here than during midsummer sunrise - the stones themselves align to it perfectly, making it a magical experience that's one of a kind. We'll be taking an extended look at the Roman Empire next - and there's no better place to start than the famous Roman Forum in the heart of Rome. This impressive set of ruins was once the heart of the city, with the likes of Julius Caesar and other important Roman leaders once crossing these grounds. After several sacks of Rome though that led to the fall of the empire during the 400s CE, many of the rocks and stones were plundered extensively, leaving the entire complex a shell of its former self. Excavations and restorations began in the 18th century - and although much of the original structure is long gone, you can still get a glimpse of what these walls once held. Our next stop within the ancient Roman Empire is the famous Colosseum. First opening back in 80 CE, its size couldn't be rivaled - more than 50,000 people could watch the many events that were held here. Aside from the gladiator fights - the Colosseum was used for just about everything and remained an important site in the empire for hundreds of years. While much of the structure has been lost to time or plundered by enemies - there's still much of it remaining, making it one of the most popular attractions not just in Italy - but also the world. Our final archeological site is none other than the famous ruins of Pompeii, Italy. This ancient Roman city was founded between the 6th and 7th century - and continued to grow and flourish as an important trading center for centuries. However, in 79 CE, nearby Mount Vesuvius exploded - covering the entire city under a blanket of ash and pyroclastic materials. Although most of the town's inhabitants survived (nearly 80% evacuated before the eruption) - an estimated 2,000 people still lost their lives on that fateful day. After a series of excavations starting in the 1700s, the entire city has became a massive tourist attraction and one of the world's premier archeological sites. NOTE: Pretty much all the models in this update were downloaded and imported into the game from sites like 3d warehouse, as there were no close replacements for certain buildings I needed. These are ingame models imported into the game with 3dsmax, they are like any other BAT you would use. Besides the Petra picture where I added the lights and made the cliffs look a bit better - there was very little photoshop used at all. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Rest of replies for "Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview)" @tariely Thanks for the kind words Yeah, I'd agree with you there, I could have probably added a couple more cars (I really wish there were more FA car props out there though). But, let's just say it's an early morning in Rome for now @mike_oxlong Thanks! Surprisingly my plugins folders aren't that big, but that's mainly because I have about 8 of them by now and I just swap them out constantly. Even if I could share my Plugins folders (I don't know if the admins would be down with that.. ).. you'd probably spend more time trying to navigate through my messy menus than actually playing the game @JP Schriefer Thanks! Glad you liked it. Petra has to be one of my personal faves so far And finally, big thanks to @scotttbarry, @AlexSLM520, @GoKingsGo, @Simmer2, @mrsmartman, @Akallan, @Odainsaker, @RandyE, @bobolee, @JP Schriefer, @tariely, @tonyr, @Manuel-ito, @_Michael, @Jolteon, @raynev1, @Fantozzi, & @kingofsimcity for all the likes!
  49. 32 points
    Takingyouthere

    Entry no.42 - Waterways of Baycole

    This entry continues from where I left off last time at Aizen fall's. Here's a couple of wide pano shots to jog your memory in case you forgot where we were on this trip down the Akallan river I spent a lot of time experimenting with mmps and creating different landscapes in the next area. I particularly like how these scenes look up close so as with the last entry the photo are from the closest two zooms. More of the area around the base of Aizen's fall. The first bridge crossing the Akallan river at an angle is Vermont Drive. Crossing Vermont Drive by foot is not recommended, unless your prepare to get soaked from the fall's mist. The Akallan river then meanders under a several bridges the first being the aforementioned Vermont Drive, followed by the twin span of highway 705. Hard to believe but there was a time when I didn't use mmp in developed areas at all. But now meshing together functional urban development with mmp covered area's is definitely one of my favorite thing to do. On the north side of the river is a small city park(Jessibel Park). 7. 8. Further south there are two final bridges. The first is the Energy East oil pipeline and the last bridge to span the river is a rail bridge, carrying the ICR Lakeridge Sub. Three different modes of transit, road, rail & pipeline. ICR Train # 303 is seen going over the bridge. This is a regularly scheduled high priority inter-model train which can sometime be almost a mile long, which is the maximum length of trains allowed to operate within the city limits of Pretoria. 12. A small pumping station for the oil pipeline. 14. 15. After passing the last of these bridges the Akallan river comes to end having reached Cisco Bay. 17. To the west of the river along the north shore of Cisco Bay is Varsity Park, another popular recreational area in Baycole. 19. ICR 303 rumbling through the neighborhood. Closes ups of the park. 22. 23. The shoreline here is a swampy marsh, spent a lot of time working on the land to sea transition here. 25. 26. This angle is probably my favorite 28. 29. And a couple more mosaics to go. 31. The next entry will probably be the final entry from the city of Baycole and will feature the few unexplored areas of the city and plenty of large scale mosaics to show everything the city has to offer.
  50. 32 points
    So I thought I'd turn an old city that I made back in early 2012 into a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Here's what used to be a downtown sunken highway, now flooded and overgrown. The embankments and overpasses crumble, creating new safe havens for animals. A "behind the scenes" of this little microcosm. Hope I didn't ruin the mosaic above by posting this.
This leaderboard is set to Vancouver/GMT-08:00
×

Help Keep Simtropolis Online, Open & Free!

stexcollection-header.png

Get the best of the best from the STEX!

Expand your city with the best from the Simtropolis Echange. Make a donation and get one or all three discs today!

Make a Donation, Get a Gift!

We need to continue to raise enough money each month to pay for expenses which includes hardware, bandwidth, software licenses, support licenses and other necessary 3rd party costs.

By way of a "Thank You" gift, we'd like to send you our STEX Collector's DVD. It's some of the best buildings, lots, maps and mods collected for you over the years. Check out the STEX Collections for more info.

Each donation helps keep Simtropolis online, open and free!

Thank you for reading and enjoy the site!

More About STEX Collections