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MayorTim

Computer with 16 cores shown off at CeBit

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I'll have to call Bill, and ask him if he could buy me this computer... or atleast buy it, and borrow it to me for about 5 years... yes.. that's a good idea...

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Originally posted by: MayorTim

All I can say is that I wish I had one of these! 16 cpu cores, 64gb RAM, 16 hard drives.... *drools* More info HERE.quote>


Wow....

I might actually be able to play SC4 on that!!! 9.gif

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  • Original Poster
  • No, SC4 can only take advantage of 1 core, and I don't know of any game that can use more than 4. Honestly, the only thing you would need 16 cores for CURRENTLY (In about 5 years this will probably be standard) is servers/heavy computing for research/REALLY heavy 3D modeling/Server.

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    Actually SimCity4 isn't even involved in handling multiple CPU's.

    It's the operating system! A friend of mine recently got a dual cpu system, and XP seems to be able to handle it. When he goes into his system monitor, he gets two graphs for CPU usage instead of one (and they will show different usages)

    So if you got XP or whatever OS you can get SC4 running on to handle those 16 CPU's then SC4 would run on them! SC4 doesn't even know or care what kind of cpu arrangement you have, thank God.

    BTW; the dual CPU system rocks Doom 3's world.... 16 cpus would be like, 240 fps or something ungoodly.

    Also, it is only 4 HD's (oh, for shame. but they are SATA!). What I like about the system is the fact that it has 4 power buttons... I would replace them with toggle switches with red leds... so I would get 4 of those puppies and network 'em, and when I would come in the room I would start throwing toggles, like I was in a helicopter or something... mmmm.... 9.gif

    So I guess you could only turn on as many blades as you need, provided that you don't need the HD's associated with them (I'm assuming that the Hard Drives are linked up one to each blade.)

    All in all, it is totally cool, and I could see hooking up 4 monitors and having 4 games of sc4 going on simultaniously! 46.gif

    As a side note, you could make the game have a multi-processor specialized version. But the reason why it never happens (or rarely so) is that few have multiple processors and by the time that many do, the operating system will be doing the bulk of the work.

    Wish I had some good links for y'all about this subject, but I learned it all in college, sadly...

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    You should all stop drooling. This machine does not have any graphics nor other human interface other than communications. Supercomputers don't, you know. You need another box to act as a console for it.

    Most games, and especially SC4, won't run at all on a multiple CPU environment. Programs have to be written specifically for this so that the program can occasionally rendizvous and get itself back in sync. Otherwise, something like SC4 will only get one CPU.

    Now, ,mind you, you could run 16 instances of the program, and depending on how good your file system was, you might be able to have them all in the same region, but probably not in the same city due to deadlock/updating issues.

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    Well, that is definitely an issue. As it stands it would need to be modified to be the ultimate gaming machine.

    For one, I would try to extend its use of gigabit ethernet (as a bus) to another box, where I would have like 4-16 video cards or something-- or 2 double-digital-jacked video cards... but still, you'd need a specialized motherboard...

    I think maybe, you could use the gigabit ethernet connection to plug it into your normal box, then get get a special OS for the multicpu setup... then run a tunnel program similar to cygwin or xwin32 to evade the need for video cards... put some crazied-assed version of SC4 up in there, and have it run on software rendering only, with full effects...

    So basically you're seeing SC4 on your regular system, but all of the crunching is actually being done by the supercomputer.

    That's just a rough outline, obviously there are some problems that would need to be overcome, such as being able to handle the input from the gigabit ethernet fully, I would think (although it might not be a problem anymore)

    It's still droolworthy though... think about what's coming next!

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    Not really useful as a home computer by any means. Not only could you buy a nice new Toyota Corolla or two for the price, you'd probably need to install a windmill in your yard to generate enough power to run it.

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    up to that, it would generate heaps of heat, which you all need to cool :S meh, I always disliked multi-core processors, since I am a gamer. Games will be single-threaded for a looooong time, and no one wants to play 16 games at the same time and the same screen.

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  • Original Poster
  • Things are definately moving towards multi-core computing; quad core processors are already in the R&D stage. It is true, games have been slow to catch on, but almost every major photo editor/ 3D Modeling program can support several cores, and games are getting there.

    In ultra-fast growing world of technology, it is rather ignorant to think computing is going to remain primarily single core processors.

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    Originally posted by: N_O_Body

    You should all stop drooling. This machine does not have any graphics nor other human interface other than communications. Supercomputers don't, you know. You need another box to act as a console for it. Most games, and especially SC4, won't run at all on a multiple CPU environment. Programs have to be written specifically for this so that the program can occasionally rendizvous and get itself back in sync. Otherwise, something like SC4 will only get one CPU. Now, ,mind you, you could run 16 instances of the program, and depending on how good your file system was, you might be able to have them all in the same region, but probably not in the same city due to deadlock/updating issues.quote>


    Yeah, that is definitely true.  What I was thinking about is how you could play SC4 and be ripping a DVD at the same time.  (And who knows what else too).

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  • Original Poster
  • Yeah, that is definitely true. What I was thinking about is how you could play SC4 and be ripping a DVD at the same time. (And who knows what else too).quote>

    More like SC, Doom 3 all high graphics, Quake 4, Halo 2, Half Life 2, Battlefield 2, be burning a CD, watching a movie, playing music, and ending world hunger.

    2.gif

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    What a waste for a single gamer... I would understand if some one needed a computer like that to run a big gaming server but just one person; that is an element of greed.  But then again, when you are rich you'll have losts of freinds to play multiplay games...

    Think of the possibilities...

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    Originally posted by: MayorTim

    Yeah, that is definitely true. What I was thinking about is how you could play SC4 and be ripping a DVD at the same time. (And who knows what else too).quote>
    More like SC, Doom 3 all high graphics, Quake 4, Halo 2, Half Life 2, Battlefield 2, be burning a CD, watching a movie, playing music, and ending world hunger. quote>


    =P

    Exactly!!! 9.gif

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    In all the tests I've seen the high-end single core processors have out performed the dual core machines in running very demanding games.  This will change as soon as the games are changed to take advantage of the dual cores.  Dual cores shine in other areas and will definately take over pretty soon. 

    My next main box will be a dual core 64 processor with 4 MB's of ram running Vista Ultimate.  I'll start buying the hardware near the end of the year and load Vista about 2-3 months after it comes out. 10.gif

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    I wouldn't start buying the computer before Vista comes out, otherwise you may end up with a very expensive doorstop. For instance, there are currently no graphics cards or displays ready for the 'trusted computing' obscenity that will be introduced with Vista. Actually if I were you I'd steer clear of Vista altogether.

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  • Original Poster
  • Unless Vista causes the price of high-end parts to be cut in half, not very many people are going to be able to use it to its full potential. I probably won't be getting it for several years, if I get it at all.

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    Originally posted by: Ma8thew

    I wouldn't start buying the computer before Vista comes out, otherwise you may end up with a very expensive doorstop. For instance, there are currently no graphics cards or displays ready for the 'trusted computing' obscenity that will be introduced with Vista. Actually if I were you I'd steer clear of Vista altogether.quote>


    That's why I said I'd be buying my hardware at the end of the year which will be after Vista comes out.  That is if Microsoft can get their act together to make a November delivery.  10.gif

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    Frankly, I won't touch Vista unless and until I have hardware that really needs it. And certainly not before the large community of users (suckers) as debugged it. Somewhere around Service pack 2 or 3.

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    I'd like to get Vista, but like NOBody said, there is some serious work to be done yet.  And MS needs to remove the "Trusted Computing" ideology.

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    Originally posted by: N_O_Body

    Frankly, I won't touch Vista unless and until I have hardware that really needs it. And certainly not before the large community of users (suckers) as debugged it. Somewhere around Service pack 2 or 3.quote>


    Do I note a hint of sarcasm in your post?  Most of the major problems will come out within the first 3 months so sometime after that I will make the leap depending, of course, on how serious the problems are.  As an MCSE I feel obligated to jump in as soon as prudently possible but I don't have a death wish so I will not be an early user.10.gif 

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    Sigh... anyone heard of 'load balancing'? Multi-threading is not the only way to take advantage of multiple processors.

    AGAIN, as a computer science guy, I can tell you that the OS has a lot to do with how multiple processors are handled. The game might be single-threaded but the operating system could be synching the CPU's in the background. My brother has had a dual cpu system for ages and especially in Linux, you will find that taking advantage of two CPU's is not too hard.

    Where do you base your assumption that games are going to be single threaded for a long time? Writing multi-threaded processes has been easy for ages. Granted, there are issues dealing with timing and shared memory, but these are simply extensions of the problems associated with multitasking on a computer in general.

    In order to maintain moore's law like growth (doubling speed in 18 months) it will become necessary to pull other tricks. You know how they make cpu's faster? They shrink the size of the components, speed up the clock, and reconfigure the positions of various components. Eventually size will become an extreme limitation-- for instance, you can reach a point where you simply cannot make a smaller transistor out of any material (quantum computing is a different story.)

    The dual core/multi cpu idea is definitely the way to go. As it becomes more clear that the multi processor computer is here to stay, more effort will likely be made on the part of operating systems creators and game creators to take advantage of this.

    In a sense, all video game systems were multi-processor. Sure, it was a sound chip, etc, which is what your computer has, but the seperate sound and video processing is in fact a multi-cpu process. Its just that since they have a very specific use, the OS can make certain system calls use them as a resource.

    Of course, there have been consoles and arcades that were multi processor.

    My point only is to say, don't naysay this box just because its not very useful at the moment.

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