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daderic888

Vertical Scaling

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G'day guys,

I'm still in the process of creating my stack of BATs from my favourite part of the world.

Lately, I've been reading about the vertical scaling aspects and a question has come to mind:

I have been creating my BATs calculating about 133% of the vertical dimension. For my residential BATs, I have made them 6 metres in height for each floor.

From what I have been reading, there may be a scaling tool in the BAT.

Would it be better for me to continue as I have been doing or to make the BATs height at real world heights (which would be about 4.5 metres per floor) and use this scaling tool (wherever it may be in the BAT)?

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I don't believe there's any big downsides to doing that method, but I would highly recommend just modeling at real world heights and then scale up everything 1.33 once you're done and about to render. Most BATers do this and it's a much easier way to go about it IMO - a couple of clicks at the end and you're completely done.

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Korver is right, it's way more practical to model everything in real world measures and when you finish it you just select everything and resize to 133% vertically.

I don't know what kind of house you're doing, but I think 4.5m is too tall. I believe 2.8 to 3.0 meters is good to house dimensions. If you're recreating a RL building I recommend you to use Google Earth Pro. It's for free and you can use a tool to measure length, width, and in some cases, height.

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  • Original Poster
  • Thanks mate,

    I forgot to mention that I'm using GMAX and I think I found it (attached).

    From the looks of things, I would have to scale it on the Z axis.

    Would I just type in 133.0 in the Z box?

    Scaling Tool.JPG

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    2 hours ago, daderic888 said:

    Would I just type in 133.0 in the Z box?

    That is the correct input to add 33%. But it should be noted, due to quirks of how gMax works, you need to select all the objects in your scene beforehand and "group" them together before doing this. Otherwise you'll end up with a real mess of objects out of place.

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    On my office midrises, I modeled the floors above the lobby/ground floor at either 4.25 or 4.5 meters each.  Oddly enough, I rarely model stuff and then scale it; I've just accustomed myself to modeling with the scaling in the back of my head (ie. overcompensating for height and then just expecting gmax to squish things a little bit vertically).

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    I model as close to real scale as possible then scale up at the end.

    In addition to what has been said above, you'll need to move the model vertically a little bit after scaling, to sit just above 0 on the Z axis again. I like to use the Left ortho view in Gmax to do this.

    If you have custom LODs make sure they are visible/grouped with the model before the 133% scaling/repositioning, or they won't match up anymore. If the LODs are just a box, remake them after.

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  • Original Poster
  • Ah ok, thanks for all of this.

    One more thing, should the ground floor / foyer / lobby should me made at about 6 metres in real world scale as suggested in a reply in one of my previous posts?

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    I almost always make the ground floor taller than the floors above; more often than not, there's a high-ceiling lobby or mezzanine or some feature inside the ground floor that would account for it.  Not only that, I do find that if the ground floor isn't taller, the building will have a squished or squat look.  Like a Corgi.  Not that I don't love Corgis, but it always looks odd to me.

    I also usually make the uppermost floor a bit taller too - you don't just get a ceiling on the inside of the top floor, with the bottom of the exterior rooftop just floating right above it.  There's usually cornice or dentals or detail work, and visually it's more appealing to the eye.

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