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A Nonny Moose

In 1660 Chocolate came with health warnings.

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No his great great...

 

Anyway I find it interesing that it mentions the technology being cutting edge. Snow and ice? Really?

 

As to health warnings I haven't eaten copious amounts of the stuff. It doesn't do much for me. I prefer Coke, although I don't mind chocolate. Indeed in drink form I probably would prefer it as I absolutely loathe eating... Such a difficult art and so time consuming and challenging for the power. Chocolate I daresay has positive influences more than negative. It may well according to these doctor men cause badnesses in the organs. However it be my opinion based on my own observations that its pros outweigh its cons, and I would advise any healthy man to continue consuming the drink/food if he so wishes to.

 

"Despite evidence of considerable industry on the part of chocolate consumers, in the 1690s the success of a new breed of elite chocolate houses led to chocolate becoming strongly associated with leisure and decadence. "

 

So this is where that old myth it be a decadent thing arises from.

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I have to watch my chocolate consomption because I am diabetes TypeB (2), and I don't consider today's chocolate as true chocolate anymore since it contains everything else than pure chocolate, especially here in North-America. But I like it, tastewise of course. ;)

 

Fred

 

Edit: I'd pay a little fortune though just to taste the chocolate of the 17th century, made from original cocoa plants as then.

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Bugging Out: Chocolate Allergy Linked to Roaches

Noooooooooooo!!!

Bleeaagh! Why did I read this?

gty_cocoa_jp_120229_wblog.jpg

Can you spot the cockroach ootheca?

Surely, we can reasonably expect the child slave laborers on the impoverished cacao plantations of the Ivory Coast and West Africa to diligently remove all the cockroach infestations from the pods and beans before the cash crop is loaded for bulk export. Surely?

Yet, despite the cockroach bits, child slavery, and chocolate allergy, I still finished off that cheap jumbo bag of Hershey's Kisses!

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Nowt wrong with cockroaches. Their nutritious enough chaps. 

 

Well I've tried cocoa mass at the Powerhouse Museum and I prefer it to dark, milk or white chocolate. That is probably the closest to 'real' chocolate

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  • Original Poster
  • Poor Fred.  I too am a type 2 diabetic, and I consume chocolate, but not the sweeteners associated with it.  Cocoa powder is 100% chocolate without the cocoa butter.  Baker's chocolate is the whole thing with no sugar nor extraneous fat except the cocoa butter.

     

    Milk chocolate is a diabetic disaster, but some commercial chocolates are not so bad.  Try some of the 60-70% bars and truffles.  Some sugar, but unless you are a serious diabetic, tolerable in small amounts.  This can get expensive.

     

    Now that we are on the subject of eating chocolate, I think I'll whip up a chocolate milk for myself:

     

    1 tbsp cocoa powder

    1 tbsp sugar (54 Calories)

    8 oz. cold 2% milk (140 Calories)

     

    Whomp with an immersion blender.

     

    Delicious.

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    Poor Fred.  I too am a type 2 diabetic, and I consume chocolate, but not the sweeteners associated with it.  Cocoa powder is 100% chocolate without the cocoa butter.  Baker's chocolate is the whole thing with no sugar nor extraneous fat except the cocoa butter.

     

    Milk chocolate is a diabetic disaster, but some commercial chocolates are not so bad.  Try some of the 60-70% bars and truffles.  Some sugar, but unless you are a serious diabetic, tolerable in small amounts.  This can get expensive.

     

    Now that we are on the subject of eating chocolate, I think I'll whip up a chocolate milk for myself:

     

    1 tbsp cocoa powder

    1 tbsp sugar (54 Calories)

    8 oz. cold 2% milk (140 Calories)

     

    Whomp with an immersion blender.

     

    Delicious.

     

    mmmmh, sounds great..........

     

    I especially love the milkchocolate, the one I am not supposed to eat. But I got used to not having it in great quantities.

    I am also a coffe maniak, drinking my 8 to 10 cups a day, which again is not very good for my health (heartproblems), but then.....we have to die of something, right?  ;)

     

    Btw, yes, chocolate lowers the high blood pressure, but my pills do a faster and better job though. ;)

     

    Fred

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  • Original Poster
  •  

    In 1660 is was very likely one pound of chocolate for two pounds of gold.

     

    Obviously since it wasn't mass-produced in those days, but I'm sure it was worth it. :P

     

    It was a commodity and if you could afford it, you had it.  The sources were in South America in all likelihood. 

     

    So think of a sea voyage by sailing ship (against the trade winds it was a [female dog] to make an offing in those latitudes, so quite expensive just to sail across.  Those barges at that time could not point more than fifty-five degrees to the wind, so back and forth for a couple of months.  As a sail instructor, I can assure you that making courses to windward without a fore-and-aft rig is supremely difficult.  Today's rigs do it quite handily.

     

    Then you could get becalmed in the doldrums and have a tough time in the horse latitudes, so called because to survive it was sometimes necessary to eat the horses brought along as riding and draft beasts.  At least the meat in that case was fresher than what had been in the supply kegs.  Going to sea before 1900 or so, was not only risky but really tough.

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    Not really a chocoholic, I just enjoy some from time to time. Perhaps I'm now more than before since I'm living in Germany, since the Riter Sport chocolate is sold with a filling of a variety of flavours: coffee, stracciatella, nuts, yoghourt... These guys really know how to make chocolate!

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    Not really a chocoholic, I just enjoy some from time to time. Perhaps I'm now more than before since I'm living in Germany, since the Riter Sport chocolate is sold with a filling of a variety of flavours: coffee, stracciatella, nuts, yoghourt... These guys really know how to make chocolate!

     

     

    Swiss and German chocolate is the best, bar none.  Puts Hershey's to shame.

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    In 1660 is was very likely one pound of chocolate for two pounds of gold.

     

    Obviously since it wasn't mass-produced in those days, but I'm sure it was worth it.  :P

     

    It was a commodity and if you could afford it, you had it.  The sources were in South America in all likelihood. 

     

    So think of a sea voyage by sailing ship (against the trade winds it was a [female dog] to make an offing in those latitudes, so quite expensive just to sail across.  Those barges at that time could not point more than fifty-five degrees to the wind, so back and forth for a couple of months.  As a sail instructor, I can assure you that making courses to windward without a fore-and-aft rig is supremely difficult.  Today's rigs do it quite handily.

     

    Then you could get becalmed in the doldrums and have a tough time in the horse latitudes, so called because to survive it was sometimes necessary to eat the horses brought along as riding and draft beasts.  At least the meat in that case was fresher than what had been in the supply kegs.  Going to sea before 1900 or so, was not only risky but really tough.

     

     

     

    And here the whole time I thought they used planes to cross the Atlantic.  :lol:    Thanks for the history lesson I already had 38 years ago in elementary school.

     

    By the way Nonny, I'm just messin' with ya man.   I know you like to offer tidbits of history to the uninformed.

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    I find that most "nice" European chocolates tend to provoke some form of mild allergic reaction in me, but I've never identified the culprit.

     

    Cheap American chocolates (Nestle, Hersheys, etc) provoke no such reaction, so I figure it's either some ingredient that contributes to "higher quality", or perhaps just that European manufacturers are less careful about avoiding cross contamination with nuts (which I am allergic to).

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    Chocoholic. What a nice word. Yes, I am a chocholic, I love chocolate. And since I have no allergy to nuts or any kind of that stuff, I enjoy all the kind of chocolates.

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    Swiss and German chocolate is the best, bar none.  Puts Hershey's to shame.

     

     

     

    I agree. But let's not forget the Dutch Milkchocolate, no matter what, if you haven't tried it, then you don't know what "real" Milkchocolate tastes like. ;) As a German born, I used to drive with my bike to Holland (4 km's) every weekend to get myself some of this chocolate as a kid.

     

     

    I find that most "nice" European chocolates tend to provoke some form of mild allergic reaction in me, but I've never identified the culprit.

     

     

    ....because it contains "real" chocolate....

     

     

    Cheap American chocolates (Nestle, Hersheys, etc) provoke no such reaction

     

    ....because it doesn't contain "real" chocolate.....

     

     

    ....and yes, I love chocolate also, all kinds, no allergies, except penicillin, but I just have to watch my diabetes....... :(

     

    .....now. where did my wife hide those small Marsbars again.......

     

    Fred

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  • Original Poster
  • You cannot get European process chocolate here, or not easily.  Apparently the chocolate process in Europe involves exposing it to a strong base with the result that the chocolate becomes more soluble in water.  So in addition to the whack from the theobromine, there is more chocolate taste.

     

    I wonder if European process chocolate is more or less toxic to dogs than the stuff we get here?  No, Virginia, you mustn't give chocolate to your doggie.  Carob is OK, though, and they can't tell the difference.

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    I wonder if European process chocolate is more or less toxic to dogs than the stuff we get here?

     

    I doubt that any chocolate is good for dogs or cats, no matter where it was made. Both categories are "true" predators, therefore totally carnivores. Yes, it can happen that cats and gogs eat something else here and there, especially dogs, but it doesn't mean that it is good for them. Dogs are more "stupid" than cats (more easily trained also) and they will give you more confidence in what you will offer them to eat, while cats only trust themselves when it comes to food, and I have never seen a cat eating or licking chocolate, unless it is mixed with other stuff, that they seem to like, such as cream, milk and cheese.

     

    But nevertheless, do not feed any sweaits to cats and dogs, if you love them  ;)

     

    Fred

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  • Original Poster
  • Theobromine, the active stuff in chocolate that gives it its caffeine-like bang is very toxic to dogs.  I can't comment on cats, which choose what they eat most carefully.  You can kill a dog with kindness.  Dogs love chocolate, but a big chocolate bar will kill even a Great Dane or an Irish Wolfhound.

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