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Duke87

10 years ago today...

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Fascinating, technology sure does advance quickly. Afterall, we all know: As soon as you walk out of the store with a new gadget, it's probably already outdated. :P


  Edited by sim_link  

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Can't even imagine what my kids are going to grow up with. Computer Terminals projected into their retinas or Holographic touch-sensitive displays.

Welcome to the world of Virtual Windows.

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...Windows XP was released.

Amazing, huh?

Then there was the beta for W7 (Vista) and now we have W7 and they expect to release W8 soon. How long was it between Windows '98/DOS 6 and XP?

So XP was only one year after ME was released?

98 was released to the Public in June of 98.

Windows 98 Second Edition on 5 May 1999, then by Windows ME on 14 September 2000. And 2000 in Feb 2000?

So its been an continuous release almost every year from 98 to XP and a 5 year gap till Vista 2 years till 7 in 2009.

Still using XP. no reason to buy something i dont need.

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I believe it is also still the most used OS. 46% or something like that.

EDIT: It seems it went down since I last checked. It is now at 35% with Windows 7 four points lower at 31%.


  Edited by jacksunny  

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One look at Vista and I switched from XP to Linux when my old machine died. This one is fully capable of running W7, but I frankly resent paying Microsoft license fee after license fee for what I can get free with support. IBMs unbundling of software when hardware became so cheap was the greatest folly ever. It gave rise to the GNU project and the Free Software Foundation. Look out! I believe we are catching up to the expensive licensers.

I do not miss the mother-you-to-death cotton wool Microsoft and Apple attempt to wrap you in.

If you want something that looks and smells like windows 7 try either LinuxMint or Ubuntu. Actually, Ubuntu is looking more like Windows 8 these days. You just have to load one of them up and follow your nose to the applications you want. There is a huge software catalog and most of it is free.

Both LinuxMint and Ubuntu include most applications people need by default. There are drop-in replacements for MS Office, and your various e-mail and calendaring clients. And of course the GIMP (GNU Image Processing Program), on which many Linux desktops are based (GTK is the GIMP Tool Kit), which is a drop-in replacement for Adobe Photosuite.

If you must run those Microsoft .exe files, there is wine (an on-the-fly windows program call translator/compiler) and mono which can run anything produced by the .NET packages.

Linux is the Swiss Army Knife of home computing and business computing as well. And for bigger machines, there is always UNIX.


  Edited by A Nonny Moose  

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So if i switched to Linux on my next PC would that be a problem loging into my work Email that uses outlook?

Don't think so, but the only way to know for sure would be to set up a dual boot and try it. As far as I know, everyone uses the SMTP mail protocol. If you are using outlook's calendaring and meeting system, you might have to use Evolution (work group system) to talk to the other parts. It is available for sure as the default mail client on Ubuntu.

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I think Windows 7 is better than Windows XP. Except for the fact that Windows Photo Viewer can't play animated gifs (which I honestly don't understand), everything about it is a step up from XP. There are many features in 7 that have me wondering how using a computer was possible before this OS was released.

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I still use WinXP on my laptop, which I bought only one and a half year ago!

Well, when it goes out of official support, I am sure there will remain some private user groups on the web.

The ultimate defense for upgrade is something small, fast and handy. Pick your Linux decor. There are lots of them.

I have used Red Hat and Debian and rejected both, but now have LinuxMint as my primary, and am still running Ubuntu as a secondary just as a curiosity. I've pretty much given up on Ubuntu because of the default desktop which I don't really like at all. Of course, being an old UNIX user, going to Linux is like going home. But then I have used eight major operating systems on main frames during my checkered career and a few between job monitors and naked hardware as well. Switching operating systems for me is like changing my hat.


  Edited by A Nonny Moose  

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You can always dual boot. My laptop used to have Windows 7 and Ubuntu but then I wanted more useful storage space on my HDD so I got rid of the partitions.

Can't wait to get my Macbook Air this xmas(I am buying it for myself), I plan on figuring out an easy to make it dual boot Linux.

This looks easy enough.


  Edited by hamsterTK  

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You can always dual boot. My laptop used to have Windows 7 and Ubuntu but then I wanted more useful storage space on my HDD so I got rid of the partitions.

Can't wait to get my Macbook Air this xmas(I am buying it for myself), I plan on figuring out an easy to make it dual boot Linux.

This looks easy enough.

I don't understand why you can't just use GRUB (Grand Unified Boot Loader) that comes on any Live Linux Distribution boot disk image. Why go through all those gyrations, when the Linux Live Boot disk will do the job if you have another operating system present and available space. I don't think you even need separate partitions.

It has worked fine for me with Windows XP and several different Linux decors.

Here is the scenario:

  1. Download the Live CD or DVD for the Linux Decor of your choice.
  2. Validate the checksum following the instructions on the download page.
  3. Create the live disk with your burner.
  4. Back up your full hard disk, preferably clone it to an external HDD.
  5. Boot from the Live CD/DVD which will take you to an in memory only trial of the O/S decor.
  6. If you like what you see, chose the install and follow your nose.
The installer will protect your existing operating system and install GRUB. After this finishes the reboot will ask you to eject your removable disk, and you will arrive at GRUB which will give you a choice of which system to load. The default will be the Linux decor you just loaded, but you have 10 seconds to choose the one you want. If you want to read the entire GRUB menu, simple press the down arrow once to cancel the time-out.

BTW, if you don't have a CD/DVD burner on your machine, you are on the wrong hardware, and need to upgrade.


  Edited by A Nonny Moose  

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...Windows XP was released.

Amazing, huh?

Then there was the beta for W7 (Vista) and now we have W7 and they expect to release W8 soon. How long was it between Windows '98/DOS 6 and XP?

I thought Win8 was for mobile devices only? That's what I heard at least.

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...Windows XP was released.

Amazing, huh?

Then there was the beta for W7 (Vista) and now we have W7 and they expect to release W8 soon. How long was it between Windows '98/DOS 6 and XP?

I thought Win8 was for mobile devices only? That's what I heard at least.

I do not understand that to be the case. There is a special desktop for mobile devices, but it appears that W8 will be a full release for all platforms.

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I used a 90s era Macintosh in elementary school and some of the computers available at my middle and high schools were iMacs. I have used a friend's Ubuntu computer before.

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If what I'm saying is true, I believe Windows 7 runs faster on newer computers than XP, but XP runs better on older machines than 7? Also, is there truly a memory cap on XP of 4 GB or is that just an urban legend?

I really do like Windows 7, I think it's a lovely OS. But I might experiment with Linux in the future. I don't like the look of Windows 8 right now.


  Edited by Yoshiisland  

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Also, is there truly a memory cap on XP of 4 GB or is that just an urban legend?

According to this there is.

Quite true and the reason is bandwidth. If you have only a few bits for addressing, as in the 32-bit decor for XP, you cannot physically create page tables big enough for more. There is a 64-bit decor for XP, and I can see that the limit could be increased, but I am not sure XP can take advantage of the wider bandwidth in the hardware.

With a modern 64-bit machine, you have the same or slightly enhanced order code (machine instruction) and many more bits for addressing.

One large mainframe I used to use had the following instruction word layout:

(Right to left)

Binary Instructions

Bits

0-15 signed memory address offset (32767) offset from any index register. If no register was used, then from the Base Address Register.

16 interrupt inhibit bit

17-25 order code

26 extended instruction bit (an order code extension) for binary instructions = 0

27-29 Register number (0-7)

30-31 Addressing type (0-3) Three types of indirect addressing (you don't want to know)

This is a single word instruction, it was a word machine and each 36-bit word was looked at as a single signed binary number, or six six-bit characters or four 9-bit bytes. Some instructions addressed double words of 72 bits, mostly floating point arithmetic. With a nine-bit order code you had 512 instruction. 000 - halt was legal, but privileged and if you were not in kernel mode caused a fault (kernel entry).

The extended instructions when bit 26 was set produced 512 new machine instructions that could take one, two or three operands which included some very fancy decimal arithmetic things. These instructions took up between two and four words, and each address could be index and indexed/indirect, etc.

Limit of addressing in this non-virtual machine was 1 MW. You could have four boxes of 256KW each.

Under contract, one of our Japanese partners made this into a virtual machine using a model that had been sort of virtualized earlier, and really made use of the extended instruction space. They took the high order three bits of the address space for a pointer register number reducing the address offset to a signed 15 bit number (plus or minus 16384), but changed the kernel mode to reserve the first physical 192K words for kernel and page table space. At that point, the virtual application space because essentially unlimited in this still limited to 1MW (4KB) physical space. Addressing became offset + Pointer (base address) + Index + Indirection (if any), and since this was taken by hardware through the segment and page tables, there was effectively no size constraint on a process. The offset+index were juxtaposed with the pointer to give an address bandwidth of 15+18 = 32 bits (85,899,934,591 Bytes). The addressing had also been changed so that the last two bits of the address was the byte number. 85GB is one very large process. And this was per process. 64 active processes were allowed, and up to four of them could be multi-user time sharing kernels and four more transaction processing kernels each with several thousand users. (And you think this site has response problems).

The base version of this machine could have four CPUs, each with a nine-level predictive pipeline and lots of cache, and four I/O processors each of which could have 32 channels any of which could have a communications processor that handled about 128 physical lines. You can imagine the number of users this baby could have.

In the extended version, you could have up to 16 active modules which gave you 8 CPU's, 8 I/O processors. All of this was crossbarred to the memory controllers, which actually ran the machine on an asynchronous basis. No buses. Memory fetch was interlaced and you could get up to 8 (four double) words at a time. A double word in the memory controllers was 80 bits. 72 data, 2 parity, and 6 EDAC bits. You can tell this wasn't a Cray, because good old Seymour said that parity is for farmers.


  Edited by A Nonny Moose  

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