Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
OcramsRzr

Drawing Manga

19 posts in this topic Last Reply

Highlighted Posts

I have done several drawings and sketches of Anime but I have difficulty making high quality but low file size images from my drawings. I tried to convert my outline sketches into SVG files but even with smoothing and efficient tracing, it was still bumpy and had far too many nodes.

I will show you my color sketch and a new version that was retraced from a photocopy of the original outlined sketch, then shrunk and colored in GIMP.

mikucolor.png

fullbodyhanddrawnmiku.jpg


  Edited by OcramSeattle  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Start: 472.32 kb

Step 1: open image in GIMP and without doing anything save as a different name. Something has made the filesize rather large and borked (I see this from time to time, dunno what causes it, just that this is how to fix it).

Result: 176.26 kb

Step 2: convert from RGB to indexed colors

Result: 55.28 kb

Step 3: run through PNGOutWin (this is pay software, but free programs that do the same thing are available)

Result: 52.46 kb

And presto, 11% of the filesize of what you started with!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Original Poster
  • I got the file size down to 202 KB but how do I change it to indexed color?

    Chris Hart books, eh? That is how I first started drawing manga. I have not consulted those books since middle school and I started the above picture in High School.

    If you think I need more practice with drawing, which books do you recommend?

    By the way, here is an edited picture with an attempt at highlights. GIMP can be difficult!

    mikucolor.png

    Here is the picture using indexed 256 color with some alterations to make it look better:

    mikucolorsmaller.png


      Edited by OcramSeattle  

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    how do I change it to indexed color?

    In GIMP, Image → Mode → Indexed

    Couple things worth noting about this.

    One, it may or may not result in a smaller filesize. You have to try it and see. On some images it will help, on others it won't.

    Two, you cannot have more than 256 different colors in an indexed image (8 bit color depth). If your image has more than that, some loss of quality will result from having to reduce the number of colors. But on that note, if you don't have more than 16 different colors, you can save some extra space by going down to 4 bit color depth (just change the maximum number of colors field in the dialogue box to 16). If you only have 4 colors, you can go down to 2 bit (again, change max colors to 4). And if your image is literally just black and white, you can go 1-bit (separate option).

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I just will tell you something: I don't know how to draw, for me to draw is a torture because I just have two left hands, also I have a bad calligraphy, so I'm suspecting that I have agraphia.

    About your drawing: it looks great, It isn't a bad start, It is just you need some corrections and to perfect your technique.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
  • Original Poster
  • I have poor motor skills so I might also have dysgraphia. If I had better motor skills the original color pencil sketch would have had much less jagged/dented lines.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    A friend of mine, who is a much better artist than I am, recommends practising drawing figures without colouring them to get the basics down. Do not draw from your head at first though. Draw from a reference so you can compare what you've done to what you were trying to draw, find mistakes, and improve.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Issues with drawing may be a common autism thing. I can draw things with hard edges that consist of simple geometric shapes just fine and I'm even decent at perspective, but ask me to draw something curvy and/or amorphous (such as a person) and I suck at it. It comes out looking flat and horrid. I also can't do shading and shadows.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
  • Original Poster
  • Maybe. I am excellent at architectural sketches (including innovation and creation) but the best I can do when it comes with people is manga (which is highly stylized versus a photograph).

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    A friend of mine, who is a much better artist than I am, recommends practising drawing figures without colouring them to get the basics down. Do not draw from your head at first though. Draw from a reference so you can compare what you've done to what you were trying to draw, find mistakes, and improve.

    I can't speak for color, but what Astro says about teaching yourself to draw is very true. I taught myself how to draw by drawing from photographs.. it took months of pure repetition, of drawing an assortment of pictures of similar subject matter (faces was my focus) that I was able to teach my hands and my eyes how to draw and recognize proper proportions of a nose, eyes, lips, etc. I'm still baffled by how to draw realistic hair, but I suppose there's always something to be learned. :P There's no shame in redrawing what another artist has already created at this point of your development.. in fact, it's one of the most effective ways to learn.

    I'm by no means an expert on drawing techniques, but I think there is something to be said for looking at more generalized drawing books, rather than just Manga-based. Pretty much any of your standard drawing lessons and techniques are universal, regardless of your subject matter.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    I am no artist but I've heard from multiple people that when using art instruction books, you just have to be disciplined and do the exercises and blow off the psychobabble.

    Also, yeah, I'm pretty sure the vast majority of people who have not trained themselves are not going to draw something perfect on their first try. Just because you aren't genetically imbued with amazing talent doesn't mean you are incapable of learning.

    Step 2: convert from RGB to indexed colors

    I got the file size down to 202 KB but how do I change it to indexed color?

    Uh...the point of doing that is?

    Anyways, if it is going to be something manga or comic-like, I suggest tracing the outlined parts with the path tool and saving that as its own layer. Then color it on the computer. I assume what you want to do is have bold lines and defined color regions, with some shading put on top of that?


      Edited by hamsterTK  

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    The main thing for drawing is to get good enough at drawing that you can imagine something in your head, and then basically copy it. It's pretty lame but you'll want to draw a lot of still lifes. So if you've got any bowls of fruit hanging around go ahead and draw it, lol. Eventually you'll learn how to copy the proportions and the curves and that kind of stuff. And as you practice drawing more things from real life you'll learn about the important details of how things really are. So if you find people references, you'll learn more about how the neck meets the head, and their volumes, and what kinds of shapes they are, and then when you go to draw something stylized you'll know what to do.

    So first I guess you would do still lifes with lines, and then at some point you would add value (how bright or dark things are), and then after practicing with that you would start dealing with color which is a whole other thing to learn about.

    But that's the boring way, so you'll also just want to just draw fun stuff too.

    It's also good to draw really loosely. Especially if you're scanning stuff in, you can erase the pencil after you've inked it, either digitally or with an eraser. I think inking it by hand, and touching it up on the computer is easier than inking it straight on the computer. You shouldn't have to worry about getting the right line the first time down, just draw it loosely a few times and the right line will emerge. Then you can worry about getting the line perfectly right, with the right line weight and smoothness and stuff when you ink it.

    Then for coloring, don't use the dodge and burn tool. Instead, open the color swatch thing and try to figure out what you need to do to the colors for different things. So maybe you're making a color for something in shadow so you make it a little more blue, or maybe there's a little bit of ambient reflected light so you add a little bit of that.

    That's all I can think of off the top of my head. I'm not a great drawer myself, but I've been around it enough that I know how to go about it, and hopefully this is helpful. Good luck. :)

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
  • Original Poster
  • Thank you. I have done OK/Mediocre still life pastel drawings and I have drawn high quality architectural sketches but I much prefer the exaggerated, colorful style of Manga.

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    The thing is though, is there's all kinds of foundational type stuff that you need to know, and the way you develop that is by doing things like still lifes. The point of doing them isn't that you care about still lifes, it's practice for learning the foundational stuff you need to know in order to draw manga. For example, to draw better faces, you'd learn the most by drawing real people's faces (obviously you don't have models sitting around for you lol so you'd draw from photographs), and then for example you'd draw the mouths, and you'd learn about the shapes of lips, and how the skin folds, and the texture, and how light falls, and all that kind of stuff. In manga the mouth isn't literally shaped like it is in real life, but instead all of the qualities of real mouths are stylized and represented. Some aspects of it are exaggerated, but others are subtle but still there.

    But this is what everyone here is saying and if you were teleported into Gainax's studios and asked someone they would say the same thing. :P

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites
  • Original Poster
  • OK, I drew a picture in late January for Valentines Day. I call her Yeoman Valentina. My sister drew the eyes.

    valentina.jpg

    This is shrunken and saved with 100% quality in Gimp. I was wondering how to turn that into a smoother cartoon than it currently is (so I can convert it into indexed PNG).


      Edited by OcramSeattle  

    Share this post


    Link to post
    Share on other sites

    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an Account  

    Sign up to join our friendly community. It's easy!  

    Register a New Account

    Sign In  

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now

    Sign in to follow this  

    • Recently Browsing   0 members

      No registered users viewing this page.

    ×

    Thank You for the Continued Support!

    Simtropolis relies mainly on member donations to continue operating. Without your support, we just would not be able to be entering our 15th year online!  You've really help make this a great community.

    But we still need your support to stay online. If you're able to, please consider a donation to help us stay up and running, so that we can help keep bringing SimCity players together to share our creations.

    Make a Donation, Get a Gift!

    Expand your city with the best from the Simtropolis Echange.
    Make a donation and get one or all three discs today!

    stexcollection-header.png

    By way of a "Thank You" gift, we'd like to send you our STEX Collector's DVD. It's some of the best buildings, lots, maps and mods collected for you over the years. Check out the STEX Collections for more info.

    Each donation helps keep Simtropolis online, open and free!

    Thank you for reading and enjoy the site!

    More About STEX Collections