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Computer Competes on Jeopardy

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it is very impressive and news of this has been floating around the blogosphere, there are a couple of videos on youtube, Watson is fast, understands and ignores Puns and occasionally makes mistake, its very scary how quick the grammar recognition softer is operating. this is the hard and impressive bit. the lookup tables are easier.

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IBM is at it again with its "Big Blue" now renamed "Watson".  The size of ten refrigerators is an indication of the amount of cooling this box needs.  Even a Cray isn't that big.  I suspect it is mostly cooling gear and they are using Josephson Junctions for switches, which would need the temperature of liquid helium.

One of my acquaintances tangled with big blue when it was supposed to be a chess champ.  He took it on with Treefrog, his own chess program and squeaked out a win.  Last I heard of my friend, he was teaching at the University of Calgary.  Treefrog was his Master's thesis project.

Did any one see a reference to Watson's LIPS rate (Logical Inferences per Second)?  If it really is a supercooled system, it is probably enormous.  This speaks well of fast database retrieval, and quick logic, but I'll bet it still can't get the Turing prize.

The Turing prize is available to computer makers who produce an AI box which, speaking remotely to a human being, cannot be seen to be anything other than another human being.

Afterthought:  I wonder if the computer also responds to the name Tom or Tommy.  (Thomas J. Watson is the founder of IBM).

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Originally posted by: Duke87

...but can it see why kids love cinnamon toast crunch?quote>

For a computer, this is a rather tasteless question.  The answer is "What is taste?"

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Originally posted by: A Nonny Moose

IBM is at it again with its "Big Blue" now renamed "Watson".  The size of ten refrigerators is an indication of the amount of cooling this box needs.  Even a Cray isn't that big.  I suspect it is mostly cooling gear and they are using Josephson Junctions for switches, which would need the temperature of liquid helium.quote>

In modern supercomputers, size does not necessarily correlate with cooling needs; very small, self-contained supercomputers may be liquid cooled, while room-sized supercomputers may be cooled simply by heatsinks and fans.  Size is more directly affected by computer architecture and problem solving approach.

In this particular case, Watson appears to be nothing more than a collection of server racks all linked to work in parallel with each other.  Boasting a relatively meager 2,000 cores, 15TB of RAM, and a paltry 80TFLOP of performance, Watson is most certainly not pushing the limits of supercomputer technology.  (Contrast that with a modern Cray supercomputer that boasts petaflop computing performance and is designed to scale up to 1 million CPUs.)

Did any one see a reference to Watson's LIPS rate (Logical Inferences per Second)?  If it really is a supercooled system, it is probably enormous.  This speaks well of fast database retrieval, and quick logic, but I'll bet it still can't get the Turing prize.quote>

That is a very premature bet to be making, especially when you consider that, even as early as the mid-90's, programmers have been writing AI's capable of tricking humans into believing they were actually human.  (One of the great jokes of the "Virtual Human" community is about a programmer wrote a script that traveled through Dungeons and Dragons playing with human characters.  This same program received hundreds of marriage proposals by guys who never realized they were talking with an AI.)

Fast foward 15 years and Watson is doing natural language processing in real time and it's doing it almost as well as humans.  It understands when it's being asked a general knowledge question versus a geographical question versus a historical question, and so forth.  It understands human word play.  It even understands slang language use and bad grammatical structure.  And it does it all as quickly as any human.

In short, I'm pretty sure it can trick a human being into thinking it's another human on the other end.

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@hym:  I'm not into AI much.  Did anyone collect the Turing Prize?  If not, the fund must be quite large by now.  Alan Turing put it up sometime around 1940 or so, I believe, when or just after he worked at Bletchly Park.  This is not the ACM's Turing Award, first awarded in 1966, but a separate prize for fooling a human being with a computer pretending to be another human.

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Originally posted by: A Nonny Moose

@hym:  I'm not into AI much.  Did anyone collect the Turing Prize?  If not, the fund must be quite large by now.  Alan Turing put it up sometime around 1940 or so, I believe, when or just after he worked at Bletchly Park.  This is not the ACM's Turing Award, first awarded in 1966, but a separate prize for fooling a human being with a computer pretending to be another human.quote>

Can you please provide a link to information about the Turing Prize, as Google has no knowledge that it ever existed.  There is plenty of information about the Turing Award, and even some information about the Loebner Prize, but nothing about the Turing Prize.

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Originally posted by: mightygoose

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turing_test hym, this.quote>

I'm aware of that page, but there is no mention of a "Turing Prize."  There's a Loebner Prize and a Hutter Prize, but no Turing Prize, which is the name of the prize I'm looking for (that assumes such a prize exists, of course.)

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Actually, I can't find anything either.  I was an ACM member for years and knew about the Turing Award.  I actually know one of the recipients, Charlie Bachman, who was very active in the Database field.  I may be totally wrong, but I always believed that in addition to the Turing Test, Alan Turning had put up a fund for the first claimant to show that their machine passed the Turing Test.

For those who don't know about Alan Turing, he was one of the leading lights of "Ultra", the decoding group at Bletchly Park in the U.K. during WW II.  These are the guys who decoded the German Enigma machine before they actually had a captured example.  The intelligence they produced was classified on a need to know basis and very carefully rationed out to protect their secrecy and the existence of such a group.  Their work helped a lot in defeating the U-boat menace in the Battle of the Atlantic, and was one of the great accomplishments of the Brits in the war.  Without them, the UK would have been starved into submission.

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