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TiggerEyes

My city is in trouble

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  • Original Poster
  • Since I've joined Simtropolis, I've learned a lot about designing my cities and I've been experimenting. However, I think I've dug myself into a hole and I'm not sure how to dig myself out. I was trying to figure out different roadway systems in my city, so it's not just endless square blocks of RCI. I completely bulldozed a large residential section that looked like slums and installed a city college there. I had hoped to add things like a library and a museum, but suddenly all my of RCI demands plunged. Nothing is growing. My budget, which seemed okay before, turned into the red. 

    What should I do now? How do I get my RCIs back up? I've raised taxes and lowered expenses to get myself out of the red, but still my demands are deeply slumped. Should I just return the section I bulldozed back to high density residental zones and hope for the best? Should I do something drastic like install an airport and promote tourism?

    Help, please!

    TE45.gif

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    Well, I had some great advice, but after i clicked reply the site went crazy.

    I will try again. Here's the deal, you demolished a large area of residential. Most of those residents were workers (They have to work you know) you destroyed their neighborhood. So, there goes a big chunck of your workforce. No Workforce=No Demand. You need that population, without it (as much as you hate slums) your city dies, as it can't get new industries or commerce. So you need to get them back! As for you budget, maybe you should delete those colleges, libraries and musems, if no one uses them, why place them? As for demand perhaps your high taxes? I suggest you pause the simulation, and try to think it through. Good Luck!!!

    Hope this helps

    -Frankie

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    When I'm trying to revitalize a city I go in and look at every map that shows demands and such. Cut back on water towers and wind power plants that are expensive and produce small amounts of power. Place a larger plant that produces more power for less money per  month. Overlapping schools and police stations and fire houses should be consolidated. Check road and street usage and bulldoze roads that aren't used. Government buildings that cost you money every month but do little for actual growth can be eliminated. Bulldoze the mayor's house, statue and city hall until you get back in black. Once you get your funds back up, buy eye candy if you want. Raising taxes makes more money but lowers demand. Make the taxes on things you want in your city low, if you want to keep it out, raise taxes on it. Don't dig yourself further into a hole by building an airport and spending more money to promote it. I hope some of these tips help.

    The Rev

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    Ack, somebody, lay down in the path of that bulldozer! You don't have to take such drastic actions to put your city back in the black. Remember, just about everything that has a support cost also has a budget slider where you can set the funding.

    Buildings that are not immediately critical you can set their funding to zero. The college, library, and museum budget you can directly by clicking on the building and adjust their funding. It takes a loooonnggg time before a drop in funding here shows up in your education stats, so it will give you a few years of rebuilding without a lot of pain. For the mayor's house you can set it in the Government Budget, and the parks you can set via City Beautification. If you want to be more drastic, you can also reduce your elementary and high school busing to zero and then in a few updates reduce the teacher funding for just the kids who walk to school (not that you could get away with that in the real world).

    This will all buy you time until you can restore your slum...er...R-$ population. If your mass transit is good, or even if it isn't, I would start a housing projects area of medium density residential in the outskirts of town and make sure it is well covered with a bus system. You might even get away with putting these new R-$ sims in the adjacent city of your region and let them commute in (also taking some strain off your budget). You may have deleted their homes, but the R-$ job demand is probably still there, much of it tucked away in some of the higher wealth commercial and industrial buildings.

    Once your population stabilizes, your budget will improve, and when that happens, you can restore civic funding.

    I like the suburbs as the target because when things stabilize, you can improve the desirability of these 'burbs and eventually convert them over to middle class. This will allow you to keep that city center area that you bulldozed vacant until you decide exactly how you want to regentrify it.

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  • Original Poster
  • You're both right. Thanks, Rev and Frankie. I guess I didn't think losing one section of low res housing would have such a huge affect. I'll lower the taxes, get rid of some of the extras, and rebuild my tax base.

    TE

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    Infoscott has some great suggestions too. You basically need to take your time and look at the big picture. The info and graphs are at your fingertips, use them to decide what you're wasting money on and where to put money to keep your sims relatively happy.

    The Rev

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    The way I look at it is, (even if I am very new to the concept of constructing and running a city) every resident of the city is important, no matter what their income. Low-resi citizens may not be important individually per se, but in large quantities that consumes a large portion of your labour force that works at places like wal-mart, mcdonalds, ect...And provides a equally if not more important service in society as say a doctor or a lawyer, because they do (in some cases) hard manual labour for low pay. 

    Destroying these sim's homes (even if it is virtual) is sinful in a sense that, they have very little to begin with, then you take what little they have and destroy it. They are the most underrated citizens of your city because they provide the menial tasks that higher educated sims don't need to bother with.

     

    So the point of this post is basically don't take the little guys for granted.

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    Totally!

    I play mostly rural cities, so the proportion of wealth is usually R-$ 80%, R-$$ 15%, and R-$$$ 5%. In larger cities the ratio is more like 25/50/25. Around farms it's all about the little guy; they are the backbone of your economy.

    Even when you get to larger urban areas, quite often R-$ are your best bargain. Of course the R-$ tax base per capita is less than the other wealth levels, but their civic and beautification support costs are less, too. If you also take into account that mass transit can be made self supporting but roads (without toll booths) cannot, R-$ can be a real bargain. The one factor that I think gets overlooked is their contribution to higher wealth C&I taxes. Unless I'm mistaken and it's scaled, the share of high tech taxes from the R-$ workers is just as important as the contribution from R-$$/$$$. And I believe every city should have a little dirty industry for realism purposes, and this along with Cs-$ is the exclusive workplace of low wealth people.

    Rich people can't eat grapes without somebody picking the grapes. If you want to really appreciate this, go to the maximum zoom level on one of your farms. From time to time you'll see a couple of sims working the fields. If you're clever and put some woods right up to the border of the farm, you may also see some wildlife ambling around while the ag workers harvest away. It's really quite inspiring!

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    I hate slums, but I've noticed that R$ serves as the basis of the economy, especially during an economic slump. Build an adjacent slum/industrial city with very high densities of R$. This adjacent city will stimulate the economy in the 'good' city, letting more businesses develop, as well as R$$/R$$$

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  • Original Poster
  • >Buildings that are not immediately critical you can set their funding to zero.

    Hi InfoScott,

    I did a lot of what you suggested and my city is back in the black. I even put off putting in a new power plant until the power advisor started "screaming" at me (didn't expect that).

    >This will all buy you time until you can restore your slum...er...R-$ population. If your mass transit is good, or even if it isn't, I would start a housing projects area of medium density residential in the outskirts of town and make sure it is well covered with a bus system.

    The area I bulldozed is starting to regrow and looks much nicer now. Unfortunately, in my panic, I expanded the residental and commercial zoning farther afield sooner than I wanted to. Housing is building like crazy, but I can't seem to get commercial building at all. More tinkering to do.

    TE43.gif

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    Thanks!

    Yeah, I don't replace electric plants until between 60% and 50% of capacity. You need the operating cost savings in the early days of the plant to pay off the capital cost of building the plant.

    For the commercial buildings, there are two considerations; traffic and concentration. Both Co and Cs like to be high traffic areas. It's usually better to not concentrate Cs, but to scatter it about in your residential areas. At most you'd concentrate some Cs into strip malls or shoping centers. Co likes to be clumped around other Co buildings. Although you can't zone specifically for Co versus Cs, your placement and desirability factors will influence which get built, so knowing this will give you some control over which is chosen.

    While you're population is still small, you'll need more industrial than commercial. You'll find it favorable to put Co zones in the transit path between residential and industrial, but don't expect to see a lot of them pop up, you'll probably see more Cs. When the populations get much larger and Co is more in demand than I, you can support a commercial center with a lot of C zones feeding off the traffic patterns of each other. So if you don't want to do a lot of rezoning, you kind of have to slowly fill in a hole where your commercial center is going to be. Alternatively you could fill that with low density residential and a good street grid, knowing that when your population rises it won't be to expensive to tear it out and make it a commercial center.

    Glad to hear your back in the black without making the city look like "War of the Worlds".

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