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Found 481 results

  1. I've started a new project: Capilano Islands. I'll be posting videos to my YouTube channel as I progress, along with additional background info on my blog. Here's the first update! Blog post: Capilano Islands - Starting Terraforming
  2. "Project X"

    Current project: "Project X" (until I find a suiting name...) (go to the last page of this journal for more screenshots) So I decided to start a new project, mainly due to the fact that my last city kept on crashing since the last patch. So anyway here it goes!; We start on small scale with a small village in a tropical mountainous landscape. With such hot climate there quite alot of power demand keeping all those AC's up and running! The railyard with the power plant in the background. One of the highways going through the area. It aint cheap building those bridges!
  3. Introduction to Suryamadi

    Hello, Welcome to Suryamadi, a 5,200 people city built in silent region called Hydramile and currently led by Mayor Fraunzy. Before colonized by Mycamile, the city is empty. There is no people living there. However, since Mycamile built first airport in the city, the city became filled by people slowly. First, the airport was a landing strip. Then, as the capacity become exhausted, Mycamile upgrades the airport into a municipal airport. After built, several changes were made, including underground parking, bus station, small cargo center, refueling station, additional hangar, airport police, and recently more airport police to secure the city from airport-related crimes. On the right of the airport, there is Statue of Proclamation, which built by the current mayor to remember the proclamation process and the proclamator, Chief ZDN. Currently, the city doesn't have any immigration office. For now, the immigrant or emigrant needs to manage the request in the city hall. Speaking city hall, it's small (technically stage 1) and in the opposite of it, there is Statue of Mayor. The upper shows current mayor, while the bottom shows the former mayor. Some parts of former mayor statues were keep in city museums. In the first era of the city dev, the city only had a small amount of commercials and farms. The farm was used extensively until now because of education and commercial and industrial boom. On the upper side of farm area, there are industrials, open metal processing, truck workshops, and warehouses. And on the right side of the farm area, there is a solar power plant with additional storage. Also, a recycling center located on the left of the plant. Many farmers migrated to vertical farms to sustain their jobs. Speaking garbage processing, there are 2 recycling plants: basic recycling plant and advanced recycling plant with power generator. As I said before, the BRP is on the left side of the power plant while the ARP is in opposite of the military zone. As a new country, the diplomacy is in the risk. So, to prevent this, a military zone has been built. The military vehicles including advanced electric tanks, electric military helicopter, electric propeller fighters, and 'modern' electric fighters. To provide radio, TV, and internet access, the goverment and Surya Group (a non-state owned company) was built 3 facility: radio station, internet center, and TV station. The communication towers will be built as soon as the city goes big. The city was connected by the internet with optical fiber cables. Not only broadcast digital TV and radio, they are also broadcast the series in the internet via services like proprietary TV/radio app and YouTube. Education has been the focus of the gov since the day 1. Many education services placed in the strategic location such as the roadside of Main Rd and Central Ave. Even better, a high school has been placed in the right side of the airport. The result of the education process is growing commercials and high-tech industrials as seen in the image above. Many investors and SOHO businessmen has been built the store and office in the roadside of Main Rd. This is also the product of low commercial and industrial (except dirty one which taxed 12%) taxes. In order to sustain people lives, a small amount of clinics and hospitals has been built. The cemetery also has been built. This cooperation makes the city more healthy and more realistic. As long as the city grow, the wealthies then made their house here. This is also the product of good education and good health services. If you looking the communication infrastructure image, you can see the no jobs zot. This is the result of Suryaworks (member of Surya Group) corruption. The execs corrupted the local officials, resulting halt of jobs growth. This case has been handled by the Supreme Court. The building is in Central Ave right in the between a private school and a commercial building. This is Lolli Forest. The forest is shaped like a square. The forest is medium-sized. This is for preserving the floras and faunas, including rare ones. This is developing CBD. This is called Dzaky District since located in Dzaky Ave. As you can see, there is an industrial area too. Bonus: When Fraunzy wins the election, the cars made the rightside of Central Ave jammed (above). Again, when Mayor Fraunzy officially inaugurated, the traffics made the some jam again (below). Community grid-connected PV power plant. Go green, folks! Community parks. See you in the next chapter! Thank you.
  4. Tour of Africa: Johannesburg

    Our Tour of Africa begins with one of Africa's most iconic cities - Johannesburg. With nearly 4 million people in its metropolitan area - this is South Africa's largest city, and has one of the best skylines in all of Africa. With a unique combination of various architecture styles and plenty of famous landmarks to boot - there's plenty to do and see here. The famous Orlando Power Station was in use for nearly 50 years - but since the late 90s, its been transformed into a tourist center, with colorful murals painted on its walls and base jumping becoming a popular activity. To make it into the city itself, one of the most traveled routes is over the Nelson Mandela Bridge - completed in 2003, its one of the most iconic landmarks in the city. Construction of the bridge was quite tricky, as it directly runs over 43 different rail lines - but construction was completed without disrupting any of them, and its been a popular tourist attraction ever since. At night, this bridge turns into a spectacle - for the 2010 FIFA World Cup, the bridge's lighting system was upgraded extensively, and a new rainbow colored scheme was installed. If you can make it here at night - the striking color show will certainly be worth it. We've made it into the CBD - and there's no better time to see the city than during a beautiful South African sunset. Despite a little fog and rain - the landmarks here are still quite stunning, like the Carlton Centre. Completed in 1973, its been the tallest office building in Africa ever since. At night is when the city really begins to come alive, however. The streets of Johannesburg are typical of any other African metropolis - there's people and cars filling every last inch of pavement. It may be chaotic, but the life and energy of these streets makes visiting this city a special experience. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: "Tour of Africa: Introduction" Thanks to @Namiko, @GoKingsGo, @Yarahi, @Tonraq, @juliok92012, @AlexSLM520, @RandyE, @raynev1, @mike_oxlong, @Odainsaker, @scotttbarry, @nos.17, @mattb325, @matias93, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @Fantozzi, @Marushine, @_Michael, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @bladeberkman, @RobertLM78, & @Toby Ferrian for all the likes!
  5. Hello and welcome to my first City Journal! The goal of this city and journal is to create an and experiment with a town located within the mediterranean. I will try and update is journal every week with the progress I have made within this city. I hope you will enjoy! The name of the newly arrived 'old' town is Urbino, named after a town in Italy. This town was once governed by a great man during the Renaissance called Federico da Montefeltro and created one of the centers of wisdom of that time. Even at this day Urbino holds one of the oldest Universities and is a sight to behold. All the pictures below show a portion of what I have already finished. I hope to post some pictures soon of what I m working on now. My mind shifts into many directions thus the amount of projects I m working on simultaneously is tremendous. All feedback is more then welcome! I present to you: Urbino!
  6. This is my latest project. What do you think so far?
  7. Hey - it's been a while. After a long period with too much going on IRL I've just come back to C:S - and I'm so happy with all the new assets and mods. I fired up Red Rock again - but after a tour and adding a few things here and there I rather felt like starting with something new. Welcome to Twin Lakes - a beautiful area based on a slightly scaled down valley around Bridgeport CA - a place I visited for the second time last fall. It's backcountry, behind Yosemite and a bit off the beaten track. I love it there - as a European it feels like the perfect Americana collection. I'm not recreating the real Bridgeport - but I take a lot of inspiration of it. There's lonely gas stations, an airfield, a barren cemetery and behind the first mountain ridge you'll see clear lakes and amazing peaks. But let's not get ahead of ourselves - here's a few first impressions of my first town in the area: Bridgeport - named conveniently after its idol and off the interstate, so there's not much through traffic. I guess there will be more in the near future. There's plenty of land... Enjoy!
  8. Hi all, I wanted to share a new project I've been working on, Piedra Verde. The idea is to try and build up a city organically, over time, with some backstory - hopefully this will result in a neat creation with some realism as well. I've started this in the early 90s - early enough that I have plenty of time to grow the area before reaching the present day, but late enough where I can get away with using most of the vehicles and buildings from the game. (Of course, some vehicles will look a bit too modern, and some buildings a bit older, just go ahead and look the other way ) Piedra Verde (a.k.a. Green Stone) is a set of islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Although it was sighted a few times before the 20th century, there was never any settlement. All anybody knew was rumors about a faint green glow coming from an island in the Pacific. (It turns out that glow is due to rare radioactive ores, but more on that later.) The islands somehow remained unknown until around World War II, and then during the Cold War it was agreed to keep the islands as a mostly secret neutral uninhabited area. Once the Cold War ended, the existence of these islands became more widespread. In the new spirit of international cooperation, an organization was formed to settle this area and investigate the glowing rocks... and profit off of the ores if possible. In 1991, the territory of Piedra Verde was born. In the rush to settle it and construct the original facilities, not that many photos exist of its first year. Here you can see the main settlement - a small port, a couple of factories, and some basic housing. They did at least have a nice football/soccer field though. Here's a closer look at the port area, including the main fuel depot for the settlement. Of course, the main reason for this new territory was the mysterious glowing rock. So far the mining operations haven't actually found much of the glowing stone - the reports of glowing were probably quite exaggerated. There was, however, plenty of coal and iron to dig up, so there was plenty of profit to be made in this new land. With all the new hype, the island's infrastructure is being significantly expanded - construction is probably the second biggest industry on the island. So that's a little preview of Piedra Verde, in the future the territory will get some actual government organization, and they'll be sure to take plenty of pictures.
  9. Entry 1: Beginnings of Seattle, Washington... and early setbacks/rebuilding. Hello everyone! As most of you know by now, I've been showing off bits and pieces of my work in progress of building Seattle, Washington for Cities:Skylines. I feel it is time for me to consolidate my progress work in a CJ place so I can share and you see my continual work in as close of an interesting city. Some background on myself, I've loved SC4 finally came back to the city simulator world when Cities:Skylines came out. My decision to build Seattle is due to living in the Pacific Northwest, although not in the city itself, for a number of years and the challenge it presents to a city planner. So without further ado, presenting Seattle! I took Steam workshop map of Seattle and then I roughly recreated the regional highway network. This work goes back sometime before After Dark. It was here that began my work on perfecting multi-level interchanges with the signature work on the Interstate 5 and Interstate 90 interchange. This is first version built in map editor, obviously not perfect. You'll see throughout this journal the gradual improvement on this design, which influences how I build interchanges now. As you can see, learning the finer details of onramp/offramp placement is pretty key to making good looking interchanges. Too bad there was not any retaining walls at the time... Oh hey, look sunken wall assets are made. This was my first real test of using them to prop up a hill slope while using duckclog's pillars. Unfortunately, I only had a single save file at this time of Seattle and the save file was corrupted. Well, it was a learned lesson to have two save files of that ever went down again... but the corrupted file incident provided an opportunity to rebuild in a more correct way. I started Seattle again in the southern industrial heart near the I-5/I-90 interchange and made some immediate build changes. First, Holgate Street Bridge and rebuilding Interstate 5 as elevated viaduct highway as it should be through this area. Second, rebuild western termius of Interstate 90 near Safeco and Century Link Fields. Rebuilding the Interstate 5/Interstate 90 interchange in it's third and final configuration. Sorry about the quality of this particular shot... As noted that new placement means a new alignment of the rest of Interstate 90 northward eventually. Note that Interstate 5 is fully elevated now throughout this shot compared to earlier shots. Finally, overview of Pioneer Square, Sodo, and Industrial Districts. Plus, early work on Seattle CBD layout. Next time, the challenge of building Interstate 5 through the Convention Center.
  10. Scenes From South America

    Our journey to South America begins in Baños, Ecuador - located in the Eastern Andes, this popular tourist resort town offers lots to do. From restaurants, hot springs, waterfalls, and plenty of other activities to keep you occupied - its an excellent destination for anyone wanting to get a taste of the region. We won't be staying here long though, as the neighboring Amazon awaits.. While Baños may be located in the Andes Mountains - it's also known as the "Gateway to the Amazon" due to its close proximity to many of the Amazon River's tributaries and streams, offering a direct route into the jungle itself. We rent a boat from one of the locals, and we're soon on our way - into the dense, humid climate of the Amazon rainforest.. We travel deeper into the Amazon, and it might be hundreds of miles before we reach the next town or village. The locals here live simple lives - while some are tucked away so deep into the forest that they haven't been reached yet by civilization - others live on the shores of the Amazon and its tributaries with limited contact. We get a chance to meet a group of them, high up on their stilt houses - the brief glimpse into their lives and customary rituals is quite fascinating. In this part of South America - much of the local economy depends on important natural resources such as oil to keep afloat. Lake Maracaibo, located in northern Venezuela, has been vital for the locals - outside of the Middle East, this is one of the world's largest oil producers since oil was first discovered here back in 1914. Much of the land surrounding the lake is surrounded by endless fields of oil pumpjacks - they've quickly become a common symbol of the region. We head back into Brazil and the next stop will be a common sight in many of the major cities. From São Paulo to Rio de Janeiro - favelas dot the outskirts and creep up along the mountainous hillsides. The people here might not have a lot - but they make the best of their situation for them and their families, creating makeshift houses from whatever they can find. Some 1,000 miles west is where you'll find our next destination - one of South America's greatest cities, Buenos Aires. The mighty obelisco rises some 221 feet above the surrounding Plaza de la República and the spaciously wide 9 de Julio Avenue - commemorating the founding of the city back in 1536, its one of the main landmarks in the city and one of its premier destinations. Our final destination takes us back to the Andes - and although much of the land here is inhospitable and harsh, there's still a number of small, charming villages and towns that you'll want to check out. The small village of Tocanao in Chile stands on the edge of the Atacama Desert - despite the lack of rain (this is the driest area on the face of the planet) - the people here have adapted quite well, making the most of a few small streams that run close by. The bell tower here dates from 1750 - built from volcanic stone, its a unique landmark that's quite striking. Note: For this update (and others) - custom content creation has been vital. I've been creating custom road texture sets (this is only a small portion of it - there's about 20 or so for the Banos pic), BATing various small buildings from scratch (1, 2,), making HD water textures, and much more. I don't know if any of this stuff will make it to the exchange soon as there isn't any documentation, a number of small things still need to be fixed/improved, and I've also been extremely busy with my CJ lately. In the meantime though, if anyone is interested in these then just send me a PM. Additionally, about the last update - the obscure BATs were not photoshopped in (that would be waay too much photoshop in my book) - they're all ingame BATs I got from 3d warehouse. The Petra pic used a bit more photoshop than usual - I made it a long time ago when I was still messing around with PS - but the pic still uses an ingame BAT from 3d warehouse with some extra effects around it (added lights, made the cliffs look better.) Anyways, if I'm doing a scene and I need something from 3d warehouse, I'll import it into 3dsmax, render it, and use it as a prop in my scene. They are like any other BAT you would use. I already wrote a number of moderately in-depth guides on this in my other "South America" update here - I might consider doing this again (more in depth) if there's enough interest. Also, all of my scenes with the crazy road textures are really just a big flat prop (ingame props, not some sort of crazy photoshop effect. That would be an excessive amount of photoshop in my book). I'll make a big texture, place it on the prop in 3dsmax, render it, and use that prop in Lot Editor. So it isn't some sort of post processing effect, these are ingame props, no different than any other prop you would use. I already made a guide on this here in my "Year in Review" entry (the Pisa picture) so feel free to check it out. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Previous Update: Ancient Ruins - Pt. II Big thanks hanks to @Fantozzi, @kingofsimcity, @RandyE, @_Michael, @MushyMushy, @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Yarahi, @mrsmartman, @mike_oxlong, @Manuel-ito, @matias93, @tariely, @raynev1, @Dgmc2013, @GoKingsGo, @Ducio, @Namiko, @Akallan, @Oerk, @scotttbarry, @Bastet69008, @schokoladeneis 1, @mattb325, @Elenphor, @Krasner, @juliok92012, @JP Schriefer, @Don_Pato, & @sucram17 for all the likes!
  11. Natural Wonders

    Our world is full of incredible natural wonders that keep us in awe. Today we're going to take a tour around the globe (except Antarctica - that's probably going to be a separate update down the road ) - visiting a few of the most unique and stunning natural wonders our planet has to offer. Note: this update contains a few gifs (4MB and 6MB) - it was difficult to get them any smaller. Africa Danakil Depression - Ethiopia Our first destination can be found in the hot, humid climate of northern Ethiopia. The alien like world of the Danakil Depression is known for its incredibly colorful sulfur pits - and also being the home of the hottest temperatures on earth. With temperatures reaching as high as 125 degrees, you won't be able to stay here long - just long enough to load up your camel with salt and continue on with the journey. Asia Sigiriya - Sri Lanka On the small island nation of Sri Lanka in South Asia is where you'll find our next location - the ancient rock fortress of Sigiriya. This stronghold was selected by King Kasyapa of the Ceylon civilization back in the mid 400s CE as a new capital - and it was truly ahead of its time. The original structure featured a massive city perched on top of the rock, with expansive gardens and trails leading around the entire structure. Little of it remains - but it continues to keep tourists in awe to this day. Australia Uluru (Ayers Rock) - Northern Territory When you think of Australia - one of the first things that comes to mind is its stunning Uluru (Ayers Rock), dramatically rising some 1,142 feet out of the outback. Uluru is the original aboriginal name for the area - and it has no specific meaning behind it. They believed that the rock has a great spiritual meaning - and was created at the dawn of time. To this day, those visiting it are urged not to climb the rock out of respect to these beliefs - and taking photographs of certain areas is also strongly urged against. Europe Holuhraun Lava Field - Iceland We're traveling to the Arctic for our next destination - the volatile and unpredictable Holuhraun Lava Field. This lava field is the size of Manhattan and its been growing at an unprecedented rate - and its also been spewing out a record-breaking amount of lava and sulfur dioxide in recent years. Hiking is surprisingly allowed here - but make sure you watch your step, especially with lava that can reach temperatures as high as 1,470 degrees Fahrenheit. North America Nares Strait - Canada/Greenland Border We're staying in the Arctic for our next sight - and you'll find the stunning Nares Strait located on Greenland's wild west coast. This pathway to the North Pole is lined with dramatic fjords and mountains - and with some of the most inhospitable temperatures on earth, every trip is an adventure. South America Devil's Throat (Iguazu Falls) - Brazil/Argentina Border Our tour wraps up with one of the most awe-inspiring destinations in all of South America - the majestic Devils's Throat of Iguazu Falls, located on the Brazil/Argentina border. This is a sight unlike any other on earth - water cascades from 3 different angles down nearly 300 feet of sheer rock, creating a thundering splash that can be heard for miles around. This is nature at its best - and its a destination that you won't want to miss out on. Note: a lot of these pictures required extensive custom content creation, and although it may look like it - there actually wasn't that much photoshop being used at all. The Iguazu Falls & Danakil Depression gifs are completely unedited - the in game animations were recorded using ScreenToGif. For those wondering where I got Sigiriya, it was downloaded here and imported into the game as a big BAT - some small editing was done though at the top to add things like better looking trees. Ayers Rock was made using the in game terraforming tools, but had a couple edits to the terrain mod and the clouds. As for the pics from the Arctic - the main use of photoshop was adding reflections to the water (in the Greenland pic), giving the lava a little life/making it glow a bit (the lava itself is real), and adding some mist/clouds in general as well. I created an entire set of textures for those pics - consisting of two parts. First one being just a simple terrain mod - consisting of fairly basic cliff/ground texture mods. Here's a demonstration of some of the base textures/cliff textures at work. Secondly, I also finally figured out a while back how to create overrides for the JENX terrain paints: 1, 2. And again, these aren't some sort of photoshop effect or whatever, they're just overrides of the in game terrain paints. For those interested, here's the pics completely unedited: here and here (the lava is usually supposed to be used at day, so I had to make some enhancements for the night time image.) So yeah, there's finally legit lava + glaciers in the game There's still plenty of work to be done and they don't have proper icons yet so they're sorta hard to use, so it could be a while for a release on anything. But as always, if anyone is interested in something then please PM me and I can send you what I've completed thus far. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Scenes From South America" @TekindusT Thank you! I really went all out on that Buenos Aires pic - took forever but it was worth it! @Bojci Thanks for stopping by! Appreciate the kind words @Dgmc2013 Thank you, appreciate the nice comment @tariely Thanks for the kind words! I'll try to incorporate more little tutorials and whatnot into my entries from time to time - and to show how I make them come to life. @mrsmartman Thank you! I'll hopefully try to do a few more of those in the future to show a bit of what goes into my scenes @IL. Thank you! Although I've done some very heavy photoshop pics for fun in the past, it's important to keep things in moderation. Photoshop had a minor role in the update - mainly for things like mist/clouds/rain effects, adding filters to give some of the pics to give them a unique character, and to also do a number of small cosmetic edits like adding power lines to the MMP'd poles in the Tocanao pic. All the buildings, MMPs, lots etc are real in the pics - containing a bunch of custom content I created along with creative uses of existing content. @GoKingsGo Thanks for the wonderful comment! @raynev1 Thanks for the kind words I've been thinking about it recently and I might try to fit them into some sort of prop pack along with some of the other models I've been working on. If you want them in the meantime though, feel free to PM me @Fantozzi Thanks for the nice comment As for the buildings I used in those pics, I believe I used the following: a rusty shack from Simmer2's prop pack vol3, some shacks from the fordoniak prop pack vol2, and the main buildings were from RDQ's prop pack and from Wallibuk's collection on the STEX. I used some of Maloskero's stuff too - he graciously sent me a decent amount of BATs that haven't been released yet though, so I think a few of the buildings in the pic might not be available yet. But I believe he is working currently on getting the other blds on the STEX here soon. Also, one last note - a few of the buildings I used had their roofs recolored to orange/red to give them a bit more of a South American flavor - hopefully that shouldn't be an issue though @Namiko Thanks! Yeah, that scene is hard to beat I'm gonna keep the updates coming too, I have a loooot of stuff I need to publish into updates.. @Mymyjp Thank you for the kind words! It would be great to see some more updates - I really enjoyed your work @Akallan Thanks for the comment! I've actually thought about Nordic countries, but the lack of BATs is a big issue. Especially the stave churches - I could texture one pretty good but unfortunately my modeling capabilities are lagging behind. I've found enough stuff though for Ancient Egypt so that's definitely going to happen @JP Schriefer Thanks for the nice comment as always @f3cs Thanks, glad you enjoyed it! @_Michael Thank you! I usually do big, massive scenes - so I wanted to change things up a little and do a few zoom 6 scenes like the Amazon river one, glad you liked it @dabadon5 Thank you! With each update, I really want to convey that feeling of being on a great adventure across the globe - so it's nice to hear that @RandyE Thanks for the comment Randy! It's quite amazing what we can create using the canvas of SC4 Finally, big thanks to @Jolteon, @CorinaMarie, @Manuel-ito, @Fantozzi, @MushyMushy, @Dgmc2013, @tariely, @matias93, @Marushine, @mike_oxlong, @mrsmartman, @bobolee, @kingofsimcity, @Krasner, @_Michael, @bladeberkman, @Francis90b, @GoKingsGo, @raynev1, @Namiko, @mattb325, @scotttbarry, @Akallan, @JP Schriefer, @RandyE, & @APSMS for all the likes!
  12. Welcome to Jessamine, a Cities: Skylines quad (which is what I call the entire C:S map- the playable and unplayable areas) that is part of the Twin Rivers Region city journal here at Simtropolis. Why just a part, you ask? Well, right now it's the only part, but I see the future of gameplay in this wonderful city builder extending, as it did for SC4 way back in 2003, for many, many years. Who knows what the future will bring? Jessamine is located in the central part of the U.S. state of Kentucky on the southern edge of the Inner Bluegrass region. It is a real-life place, and our goal in this CJ is to duplicate it in a C:S quad as closely and as realistically as we can. To that end, we've commissioned a special U.S. Geological Service topographic map. For those of you wanting to see it in a more legible size, here's a [linkie]. Jessamine quad is filled with interesting features, both natural and built, and this update [linkie] will take you on a pictorial journey through 12 of the most significant. We very much hope you'll come along on what we believe will be a huge adventure. Oh and if you do, pack a lunch. I don't think we'll be done with Jessamine anytime in the foreseeable future. David n.b. It took about a month to get around to starting Jessamine quad after we started this CJ. You can get there immediately by clicking here [linkie]. -de 6231/162 [151123] 8470/219 [151217] ____________________________________________________ The original first post in Twin Rivers Region starts here. I've made some updates and, after almost three months of CJing again here at ST, observations which appear in red italics. Well, nine years between city journals here at ST. That's not too bad. I've now taken a couple of year hiatus from playing city builders. Last spring, prepared to be disappointed, I pick up a copy of Cities: Skylines. I can now say that, after tinkering with the game for the past couple of months, that I am disappointed... disappointed that I didn't wait a couple of years until the game and the custom content community would have realized the amazing potential the game presents. As it is, now I'm hooked. The game, as it stands today, has IMHO terrible flaws. I'll note one here and then talk more about them in future posts. See the stream in the title shot above? If this was SC4, the streambed and banks would be full of ploppable rocks and flora. The stream looks naked to me without them. On the other hand, if this was SC4 the water would not be flowing downhill- an incredibly well simulated flow at that. Hooked? Hell, I'm landed and on the stringer. I'll also take back that C:S has terrible flaws. It has flaws, but what doesn't? And, due mainly to the incredible efforts of a great modding contingent that has developed seemingly overnight, there are fewer of those flaws left on any given day. Sure, there is still stuff for the game's creator, Colossal Order, to do. But we're less than a year in, and I don't think that it is overly optimistic to think that CO's track record to date would indicate that we have some great things in store in the coming months. Ploppable rocks? Within ten days or so of this post they began appearing on the Steam Workshop. Now there are a greater variety of stones, rocks and boulders there than ever existed in SC4. As we go forward here in this city journal we'll be highlighting the ones we use along with the custom content makers who are giving them to us. So, because I'm weak, I guess, I have looked past the deficits and focused on what I can do with the game right now. If you don't want to listen to me whining though, probably a lot, you might want to skip this CJ. I don't intend to be satisfied with C:S as it stands today or on any given day. This game could be SC4's worthy successor. If I can help make it that way, I will. Cities: Skylines is SC4's worthy successor. I got over it, although SC4 will always be my first love. You'll get over it too, I'd bet real money. This is my 81 gamesquare region. For some reason, I'm calling it Twin Rivers Region, or "2RR" for short. Go figure. A number of people have PMd or otherwise gotten in touch with me to ask, "Hey, what about Three Rivers Region?" I'm wondering what about 3RR too. Maybe at some point we can have that discussion- I'll think on it and let the community know when I'm ready. UPDATE 151217: We may be reaching that point sooner than I thought [linkie]. As for, to take first things second, "my 81 gamesquare region:" all I can say is "oops." After Dark killed it, and probably that was a good thing. I'm much more conservative about what mods I use these days. We'll be talking about that. UPDATE 151217: The 81 Tile mod is back though, and done by BloodyPenguin, a top quality C:S modder [linkie]. I hear its siren song. I hand terraformed the basic topography in the game's map editor. The terraforming tools, compared with SC4, are clumsy and difficult to work with. Actually, they suck. It took me a week to create this map, and I almost pitched it because I couldn't ever get exactly what I wanted. But I hung in there, and just in time an in-game terraforming mod, about which there'll be more later, came along. I've now been working in-game for about a month, and fine detail gets a little better every day. My skill at using the tools is getting better. The tools still suck. I'm really hoping that CO can step in and address terraforming, which is such a huge necessary component of any successful CB game, on a comprehensive basis in a future update release. If the developer would like any specific suggestions I'm not hard to find. Now that's more like it. I'm not a fan of the low poly, exactly the same trees, but that'll improve over time. I wish cycledogg was around to do some better textures. I also don't care for not having a better handle on distances, which was built into SC4 by virtue of the grid. Terraforming in C:S would be vastly improved by having an overlay "guidelines" grid, say 100 metersx100 meters, that would allow better and more realistic detailing to scale. The game also needs the ability to press a key and display the elevation, in meters, of wherever the cursor is located. "low poly, exactly the same trees" "better textures" For all intents and purposes, these have been addressed. They will continue to be refined, I'm sure. Measuring distances within the game has not had a perfect fix applied yet, nor has an in-game elevation ability been provided. I am confident that these things will come soon. Of course, I've started naming things. Hey, modders, or CO, how about the ability to label stuff in game. Pop ups giving some detailed info along with the name would be nice. And the roads. Don't even get me started. Such an abundance of riches, but so many issues. There will be future posts entirely devoted to this area of the game. For starters, though, a good two-lane rural area arterial road would be not just a welcome addition, but an essential one. "ability to label stuff in game" "a good two-lane rural area arterial road" The pop-ups with detailed information are still out there on the horizon. Better roads and the ability to customize them are happening through modding as we speak. I'd really like for CO to formally add them to the game, though, along with a much improved selection of bridges. Here's the road down the west side of Williams Pass. The right-of-way looks pretty raw because I just built it (heh!). You can do some pretty good stuff with the in-game smooth slope terraforming tool, so those tools aren't all bad. How about a slope mod, though? I think we figured those out in SC4's second year, right after Rush Hour came out. "slope mod" It's literally Christmas every day for the C:S gamer. Anyway, 2RR is, as advertised, "a work in progress." I'll try to update a couple of times a week. Thanks for visiting- see you around. David 0/0 The term "2RR" was apparently too cute by half, because even I couldn't stand to use it. It took me about 30 minutes to start referring to Twin Rivers Region as "TRR," and that has stuck. I can tell you that one thing that will not change is considering this CJ "a work in progress." Cites are never "done" (well, maybe Pompeii, but that's a whole 'nother thing) and I doubt countrysides are either. There is always something to change. To make better, To make worse. To make different. That's the way the world works. That's the way this CJ is going to work. We have had a great run here in the little less than three months that we've been up and running. We are currently ninth out of all the CJs in the Cities: Skylines forum-based city journal section in page views and in third place in the number of replies. We currently average about 150 page views and around three comments a day. That's not me doing that- it's you, the readers- lurkers and commenters alike. Thank you to every one of you. I'm going to make this worth your while- that's a promise. -de/151123/151217
  13. Bohemia

    Located in the western Czech Republic, Bohemia is a region full of picturesque landscapes and charming villages. Few are as delightful as Hrensko - and its where we'll begin our tour. Founded back in the 15th century as a trading settlement on the Kamience gorge, its turned into one of the most popular tourist destinations in the area. Hrensko also serves as the entrance gate to Bohemian Switzerland National Park - but be sure to take in the village for a day or two before sailing down the Kamience gorge. The Kamience gorge cuts through the heart of the park, and riding a slow sailing boat down the river is one of the most popular tourist attractions. The steep cliffs are quite incredible, but remain quiet until our tour guide finds a rope attached to the other side and gives it a huge pull... The Umelý vodopád (artificial waterfall) comes gushing out of a small crack at the top of the rock cliff - creating quite the splash and the perfect photo opportunity. We emerge out of the gorge and start making our way through the heart of the park. After a few hours, we finally reach one of the most stunning tourist attractions in the area - the striking Pravcická brána, the largest natural sandstone arch in Central Europe. In 1826, an inn was built here and has remained a popular spot ever since - after a hard day of hiking, there's nothing better than a good meal here. Be sure to take advantage of the many paths that wrap their way around the arch to get a great view of the landscape - but remember that the top of the arch has been out of bounds since the 1980s due to heavy erosion from tourists. Our last destination in Bohemia is the impressive Pravcický kužel (Pravcický Cone) - one of the most imposing structures in the entire park. For the thrill seeker out there, its the premier destination in the entire park - but only the bravest of climbers would dare to take on these sheer cliffs in the dead of winter... During summer however, when things are a bit more manageable - rock climbers from all across Central Europe will take on the cone. For those who can scale up these challenging cliffs - hundreds of feet high with little to no room for error - they will be rewarded with some absolutely incredible views from the top. I hope you enjoyed your visit to Bohemia - its truly a timeless beauty. NOTE: In order to make this update, I really had to put my BATing skills to the test. I modeled and textured these BATs completely from scratch (1, 2, 3 - pictures taken from the Lot Editor window) specifically for the update - if anyone would like to try the models out for themselves then please PM me Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Natural Wonders" @IL. Thank you for the comment! @BC Canuck Thank you I actually hadn't heard of the Danakil Depression either until recently - but once I first saw the mesmerizing colors I knew I had to give it a go. @tariely Thank you for the kind words! Yeah, I'm planning on releasing a bunch of stuff here at some point. I'm going to be insanely busy with my CJ for a bit as I get out a lot of older updates though, so probably once things settle down. But in the meantime, if there's anything you're after in particular, feel free to send me a PM and I'll see what I can do @mattb325 Thank you for the nice words! @elavery I just checked it out - quite stunning. The cliffs and lack of proper BATs though would be a concern, but I'll think about it in the future Thanks for the suggestion. @Mymyjp Thank you, glad you liked it! @gaiskerein Thank you for the comment and kind words! @TekindusT Yep, 100% certified photoshop free Thanks for the comment And finally, big thanks to @Manuel-ito, @RandyE, @matias93, @AlexSLM520, @bladeberkman, @Brooklyn81, @CorinaMarie, @tariely, @Odainsaker, @huzman, @mattb325, @scotttbarry, @nos.17, @_Michael, @Marushine, @Tonraq, @Jolteon, @Tyberius06, @jakis, @Fantozzi, @raynev1, @Elenphor, @Andrey km, @Yarahi, @bobolee, @SC4L0ver, @juliok92012, @Silur, @mayor11, @mrsmartman, & @Jonas_Chaves for all the likes!
  14. Major Emergency

    BREAKING NEWS A major fire has broke out in an office block in the financial district! all emergency services are attending the scene with mass evacuation of localised buildings. the city's mayor and member of parliament are also heading towards the scene. No news has come forward yet, of how it started but witnesses say they heard a loud bang then seen a huge plume of smoke billowing up. I will keep posted on what is happening!
  15. New reclaimed westside

    Over recent years, the government have granted to reclaim part of the port of Middledell. Now the new sky scrapers, residential blocks and a new A&E/ trauma centre all combined work together to create the Westside. A new Railway terminal was constructed for the west coast mainline, and the western suburbs. A new extension on the metro was also constructed giving way to 3 new metro stations, including the state street metro station, now one of the buisiest on the network.
  16. This is from a mobile game called Designer City.
  17. Reclaimed Harbour land

    For many years city planners have wanted to gain some land back from the harbour. The derelict harbour walls around the CBD where crumbling and the city needed extra office space. years on and the progress is staggering! CRANES every where. With 6 new blocks being built with many new office towers planned the city is gaining world wide recognition. The first is what it previously looked like.
  18. More old town

    More images of old town
  19. Middledell old town

    This is the city's old town built for the Industrial Age, many town houses, with a public market square. now the square is home to old boutiques and r$$$ town houses. it holds popular markets such as farmers and vintage fairs every Sunday, bringing life to the old town.
  20. A quick overview of the city!

    So this is my city of middledell, very densely packed CBD, central business district. with a very busy main railway terminal, bringing people from the region to the cultural and financial hub of the region. with new proposals of new towers, new residential areas, even reclaiming of land to disregard the old waterfront for new office space. It's a region of two cities one of major industrial power, manufacturing and new high tech and middledell the financial and cultural centre.
  21. August 2, 2017 - 200,000 Trees

    Update 38 - click here [linkie] to see the content.
  22. North Coast

    A new vector of commercial jobs and services is in creation, the North coast. This coast is in a conurbation with the city center and the port zone. We will be talking today about the Neighborhood Nossa Senhora da Paz, the first one of the series This new location give the great demand of Commercial and service a new place where the minor investors and other companies that want to run from the monumental expectations of the city center, or just don't want to build gigantic skyscrapers. This part of the city is fully planned, and include things as a hotel complex Or few things for your comfort, like bigger sidewalks, or a bicycle path and beach bars Do you have a faith? Want a little of fun? We have a big church, side to side to a big park. You can even have a picnic after worship. We recommend you to reach our neighborhood by public transport, with the new station of the line 2 called Nossa Senhora da Paz, named after the park and the avenue. Vision of the whole neighborhood:
  23. Ancient Ruins - Pt. II

    For the second part of our tour, we begin by traveling to the Middle East to take a look at one of the world's most unique set of ruins - Petra. Founded by the Nabataean civilization as early as 312 BCE, this ancient sandstone city flourished for centuries - and the construction of the Treasury in the 1st century CE was a time of considerable growth and prosperity for the civilization. By 106 CE the Roman Empire captured the city - while Roman influence can be seen throughout the complex, they still thrived as a trade center for many more centuries. Eventually though, the Romans moved their trade capital from Petra and the entire city faded into obscurity and was abandoned shortly afterwards. The ruins have remained a mysterious landmark since then - in fact, the whole facade of the Treasury is riddled with bullet holes after Bedouin tribesmen tried to break in, hoping to recover riches inside. To this day, the entire complex remains a popular tourist attraction in the area - be sure to visit at night when the entire complex is lit up by a stunning display of candles - its one of the most magical experiences imaginable. For our next iconic ancient ruin - we're traveling to the rural farmlands of southern England. Stonehenge was built between 3200 and 2000 BCE - making it by far the oldest ruin on our list. The druids who built this megalith used ingenious methods to move these rocks around - and although its not entirely agreed upon, most believe that some sort of earth ramp was used to lift the stones into perfect position. There's no better time to visit here than during midsummer sunrise - the stones themselves align to it perfectly, making it a magical experience that's one of a kind. We'll be taking an extended look at the Roman Empire next - and there's no better place to start than the famous Roman Forum in the heart of Rome. This impressive set of ruins was once the heart of the city, with the likes of Julius Caesar and other important Roman leaders once crossing these grounds. After several sacks of Rome though that led to the fall of the empire during the 400s CE, many of the rocks and stones were plundered extensively, leaving the entire complex a shell of its former self. Excavations and restorations began in the 18th century - and although much of the original structure is long gone, you can still get a glimpse of what these walls once held. Our next stop within the ancient Roman Empire is the famous Colosseum. First opening back in 80 CE, its size couldn't be rivaled - more than 50,000 people could watch the many events that were held here. Aside from the gladiator fights - the Colosseum was used for just about everything and remained an important site in the empire for hundreds of years. While much of the structure has been lost to time or plundered by enemies - there's still much of it remaining, making it one of the most popular attractions not just in Italy - but also the world. Our final archeological site is none other than the famous ruins of Pompeii, Italy. This ancient Roman city was founded between the 6th and 7th century - and continued to grow and flourish as an important trading center for centuries. However, in 79 CE, nearby Mount Vesuvius exploded - covering the entire city under a blanket of ash and pyroclastic materials. Although most of the town's inhabitants survived (nearly 80% evacuated before the eruption) - an estimated 2,000 people still lost their lives on that fateful day. After a series of excavations starting in the 1700s, the entire city has became a massive tourist attraction and one of the world's premier archeological sites. NOTE: Pretty much all the models in this update were downloaded and imported into the game from sites like 3d warehouse, as there were no close replacements for certain buildings I needed. These are ingame models imported into the game with 3dsmax, they are like any other BAT you would use. Besides the Petra picture where I added the lights and made the cliffs look a bit better - there was very little photoshop used at all. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Rest of replies for "Ancient Ruins - Pt. II (Preview)" @tariely Thanks for the kind words Yeah, I'd agree with you there, I could have probably added a couple more cars (I really wish there were more FA car props out there though). But, let's just say it's an early morning in Rome for now @mike_oxlong Thanks! Surprisingly my plugins folders aren't that big, but that's mainly because I have about 8 of them by now and I just swap them out constantly. Even if I could share my Plugins folders (I don't know if the admins would be down with that.. ).. you'd probably spend more time trying to navigate through my messy menus than actually playing the game @JP Schriefer Thanks! Glad you liked it. Petra has to be one of my personal faves so far And finally, big thanks to @scotttbarry, @AlexSLM520, @GoKingsGo, @Simmer2, @mrsmartman, @Akallan, @Odainsaker, @RandyE, @bobolee, @JP Schriefer, @tariely, @tonyr, @Manuel-ito, @_Michael, @Jolteon, @raynev1, @Fantozzi, & @kingofsimcity for all the likes!
  24. Southeast Asia

    Our journey to Southeast Asia begins with a trip through the scenic, mountainous landscape of northern Vietnam. For thousands of years, terraces have turned these hillsides into effective farmland - with rice being the staple crop for many. For as far as the eye can see, these terraces stretch on into the distance - a never ending showcase of simple, rural beauty. Our next stop is the mysterious Chocolate Hills of Bohol Island in The Philippines. Some 1,776 brownish-red hills dot the landscape for miles around, and a variety of wild myths try to explain their existence. Some legends state that the hills are the leftovers of massive pebbles thrown by giants many eons ago. Others believe that the hills have a cosmic connection, with each hill representing various stars and planets. No matter what the explanation, they still leave us in awe. The crater lakes of Kelimutu in Indonesia are one of the more remarkable destinations on our journey - the lakes are just as stunning as they are mesmerizing. The mineral rich water that fills each of these lakes changes color many times throughout the year, so each trip is truly a unique experience. Despite the ominous steam that emanates from the lakes, the volcano has actually been dormant for quite some time. Our next stop is the largest Buddhist monument in the world - Indonesia's Borobudur. Rain or shine, it's a truly impressive structure - we're amazed by the sheer quantity of artifacts on display. With over 2,500 relief panels and 500 Buddha statues lining the exterior, we've never seen anything like it before. Reaching the top brings incredible views of the surrounding landscape - but more importantly it signifies the end of a pilgrimage for Buddhists. As we start to head back north, a can't miss destination is Thailand's Phang Nga Bay, tucked away on the west coast of the country. With over 40 limestone islands jutting hundreds of feet into the air, it truly takes your breath away. We grab a boat and find a secluded beach on one of the islands - no better way to spend the day! As our journey begins to wind down, we make sure to visit one of the iconic landmarks of Southeast Asia - Cambodia's Angkor Wat. The world's largest religious monument never fails to disappoint - you could spend years exploring this vast complex. While the views from the outside are truly impressive, the interior is a different story. To our dismay, we find out that much of the complex has been looted in recent years, with bas-reliefs and relics fetching high prices on the black market. It'll take a little exploring around to find the rooms left in pristine condition - but it's certainly worth it. Our final stop is none other than one of the most impressive archeological sites in the world, Myanmar's Bagan. Over 10,000 pagodas were built on this vast desert plain nearly a thousand years ago - with a little over 2,200 remaining today. Despite constant earthquake damage (the ruins are built directly on top of a fault line) - the locals continue to rebuild these treasured ruins time and time again. No trip to Bagan is complete without a hot air balloon ride - despite the steep price, the incredible views for miles around make it a once in a lifetime experience. Don't forget to comment, like, and follow True Earth if you haven't already! -korver --- Replies for "Moscow"
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