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edd17

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  1. Goths to be banned from UK shopping Mall

    You have to wonder what kind of research went into this decision, usually i take the prevalence of goths in an area to be indicative of a wealthy middle class and a generally safer and more pleasant area. This is really just a matter of someone not liking the way they look.
  2. Goths to be banned from UK shopping Mall

    First they came for the hoodies I remained silent I was not a hoodie Then they came for the goths I remained silent... ...and so on, WHERE WILL IT END!?!
  3. Railroad capacity

    The values for capacity aren't realistic at all, the regular rail should have a greater capacity then the highway. I increased the capacity of the rail, subway and monorail with the iLive reader, if you have the NAM installed you have to edit one of the NAM files in the plugins folder.
  4. Originally posted by: manticorefan No religious/ conspiracy theorist content? Hmmmm.... Enviromentalism has become a religion all it's own, with Algore as its messiah, and the us-vs-them viewpoint common to many religions. The with-us-or-against us philosophy, etc. Try radioliberty.com, it might explain some things. Ever heard of the Georgia Guidestones? The eco-types want to eliminate 5.5 BILLION people to save the enviroment; not many would be left to enjoy it....quote> There has been no religious or conspiracy theories because most people here are debating the scientific validity of the theory of anthropogenic global warming while some only seem to be here do air their dislike of Al Gore. Trying to invalidate our arguments by comparing us with some of the more excitable groups on the internet isn't going to work, and I'm not going to say what that says about your position (though i would hate to group genuine sceptics with those who simply refuse to acknowledge the facts). I haven't heard of the Georgia Guidestones because they are a fringe group with some strange ideas, few people think that this kind of thing is necessary but it seems convenient for people ignoring the fact that they are damaging the ability of the environment to regulate itself and harming others through their overconsumption of the planets finite resources to simply dismiss people who are concerned about this as tree huggers with nothing better to do and possessing some sort of mental incapacity. Originally posted by: coolotter88 the "eco-types"quote> Again, lumping people with genuine concerns about the state of the environment into the same group and considering them all enviro-hippy-commi-nazis isn't going to make the facts go away.
  5. The reason that the worlds population is growing so fast is that infant mortality has fallen, but in developing countries they are still having large families as they would have when the extra children were needed as insurance so some would survive. In more developed countries birthrates have fallen and population growth has levelled off. There is always going to be some population growth but the biggest problem is that more people in developing countries are starting to want to live like we do, and there are not enough resources for everyone on the planet to do that.
  6. The reason that the worlds population is growing so fast is that infant mortality has fallen, but in developing countries they are still having large families as they would have when the extra children were needed as insurance so some would survive. In more developed countries birthrates have fallen and population growth has levelled off. There is always going to be some population growth but the biggest problem is that more people in developing countries are starting to want to live like we do, and there are not enough resources for everyone on the planet to do that.
  7. Carbon dioxide is one of many gasses which contribute to the greenhouse effect but the problem is that so much of it is being released into the atmosphere. How bad its effects will be is open to debate but we can be sure that increasing the levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere will increase the amount of heat in the atmosphere which will probably alter weather systems to some degree. The atmosphere, the oceans and all plant and animals can be thought of as a self regulating system, altering the system in some way upset the balance in some way but ultimately the system will adapt to this (playing SimEarth can give a basic idea of how this works). I don't think that the earth will be transformed into a Venus like planet, but i do think that humanity will suffer as it has to adapt to new climate systems.
  8. This diagram shows the imbalance in the release and absorption of CO2, the actual imbalance is quite small compared to the how much passes through the system. When comparing the amount that would need to be taken out of the atmosphere to the amount that is taken out by photosynthesis, it would have seemed like a reasonable option.
  9. This reminds me of one of the older plans to combat the increase in CO2 in the atmosphere by dumping loads of iron in the ocean to promote the growth of phytoplankton, but the amount of CO2 released by the boat on the journey out to sea was greater then the amount taken out of the atmosphere. I think they want to pump fertiliser out to the middle of the ocean now.
  10. NationStates.net - Simtropolis Region

    I just joined with my nation; The Oppressed Peoples of Eddonionia.
  11. Originally posted by: coolotter88 not really, storing hydrogen as a liquid is pretty low weight and low volume (compared to others). quote> Yes, as you are only storing hydrogen and nothing else is taking up room in the container then more can be held, but the equipment used on the vehicle itself would weigh quite a bit, and would be expensive, and the equipment required to pressurise and transfer the hydrogen to the vehicle would also be expensive. Wikipedia states (although they have not cited a reference of this particular figure) that the energy used pressurising the hydrogen to high enough could account for 30% of the total energy used unless the energy from the pressure can be recovered. Originally posted by: coolotter88 metal hydrides are heavy because they have a large amount of metals used to help store the hydrogen. however, chemical hydrides are pretty light though there is a problem with the spent chemicals after their hydrogen is released.quote> The crystal lattices mentioned are much lighter than other chemicals used, and in most cases of chemical storage systems the chemicals used have been developed so they can be 'recharged' with hydrogen through simply exposing them to hydrogen at a suitable pressure.
  12. You may be right, i can't find much information (i just want the numbers involved) comparing the different methods, i am not very good at gas law concentrations and i wouldnt want to treat the values i might arrive at as definitive either. The actual amount of hydrogen that is stored is based on the number of moles of the hydrogen atoms that are held, not the volume or the mass. The absolute amount of hydrogen gas that can be stored cryogenically, or just at very high pressure, may be higher then that of a chemical hydride and other similar storage systems, the equipment is too heavy, while chemical storage systems are much lighter (allowing greater mileage) and in my opinion have the potential to be much cheaper.
  13. In what way do you mean? if you are judging by the readiness of use then yes, as pressurised hydrogen gas can be tapped off at any rate while hydrogen stored in any other way would be released at a slower rate (the rate at which it is released is usually sufficient). The article mentions that for a 300 mile driving range hydrogen at standard conditions (room temperature and sea level pressure) then a volume equal to a double decker bus would be required. The size and weight of the containers necessary for storing the gas under high pressure or in a liquefied form would be too much. Storage of the hydrogen in a chemical hydride or in a crystal lattice allows much larger amounts of hydrogen to be stored in a more practical way.
  14. The gallium doesn’t get used up but the aluminium does; I don’t know how easy it would be to extract the gallium back out of the aluminium afterwards, or if it would need to be removed for the aluminium to be reprocessed but that would be a major obstacle in this systems development. Another idea is to produce the hydrogen at a large plant and then store it in a crystal lattice; it is easier and safer to store it in this way then using simply using pressurised hydrogen. A new type of lithium compound has been developed and is talked about here
  15. Anyone who has ever seen the thermite reaction knows that a lot of energy can be released by the oxidation of aluminium, and I think that this process is a similar (using water as the source of oxygen and the hydrogen being left over). The amount of energy used to produce the aluminium used needs to be taken into consideration though. Bauxite is the most commonly used aluminium ore and is comprised mostly of aluminium hydroxide, which needs to be heated to produce aluminium oxide (aluminium hydroxide at a lower energy state then aluminium oxide), and the aluminium is then extracted from the aluminium oxide using electrolysis, a very energy intensive process and electricity use can amount to up to 40% of the costs of production (the reason so much energy can be released is that so much energy has to be put in). The article mentioned the recycling of the aluminium oxide produced, which would skip the process of converting aluminium hydroxide into aluminium oxide and reduce the amount of energy used. However the amount of energy consumed to produce the aluminium is equal to the amount of energy released (not considering efficiency and transport), as you are starting with aluminium oxide and finishing up with aluminium oxide, and another source of energy will need to be used to supply the electricity for electrolysis. This is another example of how hydrogen can only be used to transport energy, not as an energy source. Breaking down water through electrolysis may be more efficient, although the electrolysis of water can be very inefficient and steam reforming (production of hydrogen from hydrocarbons) is usually much cheaper. This can be a very efficient way of transporting energy for use in vehicles and other things which usually require petrol engines, but the actual energy input will still be from some other form of energy (hydropower is often used to supply the energy for aluminium production).
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