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    CNN: SimCity Creator Will Wright Happy about Microsoft's DRM Reversal

    ....

    Digital Rights Management (DRM) has been an issue with the launch of EA's SimCity earlier this year and the announcement of Microsoft's Xbox One features at E3. As a developer, what are your thoughts on the role DRM plays in gaming today?

    We're coming at this with the mentality that when I buy media I own the disk or whatever for the rest of my life. I can put that DVD in my machine and watch it and share it with friends and trade it in. We're slowly moving to this idea that everything is on the cloud and I'm actually buying rights, and I don't physically own the actual product. There's a legal component to this, and there's a consumer psychological component to this. The sensibility of being able to play a game I want to on a PC or any device is great. I love that freedom and the free-to-play games have made good use of that. From the consumers' point of view, I can really understand a lot of the backlash to DRM. The fact that if something's required on the Internet that means they can't play it on the airplane or if their Internet connection goes down. It was interesting watching the Microsoft thing. I thought it was very impressive how responsive Microsoft (MSFT) was to that. DRM is going to be an ongoing negotiation because there are features to the DRM, or at least Internet connectivity, that is a very attractive solution to the piracy issue. Gaming has had a long history of piracy, but you can't use DRM at the expense of the customers. I'm not really sure I have a clear answer to this except that it's going to be something that we slowly acclimate the player base towards. It's really not a lot different from if you have an MMO or peer-to-peer game that requires connectivity with other players, but a lot of games don't necessarily require that. If you're just going to require it for DRM purposes only that's obviously where it upset the consumers.

    What are your thoughts of the power that gamers have now to voice change through social media and actually impact game development and game policies and move a giant like Microsoft to change its Xbox One policies?

    That part I think is great because that's something that I've always believed in -- getting the players very involved not just after the game ships, but even before and try to listen to them. The kind of games I'm interested in, and actually the way games are going, is they're becoming far more baseline communities of people playing the game and doing a lot of cool stuff peer-to-peer, whether it's content sharing or competition or forming social connections. I tend to think of the fan base, especially the hardcore fan base, as co-developers. These people with a passion for your project are going to go out and sell your game to other people and pull other people in. The more they feel like they have some ownership over the process and they're not just kind of customers, the better. To see a company like Microsoft actually sit back, listen, and understand the fans and respond to them is impressive. For a company that size to be that responsive is great. These companies are the ones that obviously keep us in business and allow us to make games.

    On the other side there's the Internet thing where 5% of the people are making all the noise. Sometimes they represent the other 95%, sometimes they don't. A lot of times the 5% are asking for ridiculously elaborate features, and as a game designer you know that's going to make the game inaccessible to everybody else. There are these people that want you to push a franchise in a super hardcore direction, and therefore we're going to close it off to 95% of the players, so you have to understand what kind of feedback that they're giving you. But when it's something that's 5% representing the other 95 that will probably feel the same way, then I think it's really valuable.

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    Interesting that he says DRM is not a solution for a single player item if the only reason to use DRM is some policy or other.  (That's what I read into it, anyway).

     

    The folks at Origin (EA) will sell you SC4, but their DRM login and all that guff is included in the deal.  The horse left this barn in 2003 and only injections of free custom content have kept it pooping along.

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    The folks at Origin (EA) will sell you SC4, but their DRM login and all that guff is included in the deal.  The horse left this barn in 2003 and only injections of free custom content have kept it pooping along.

    This comment is absolutely irrelevant to the current news discussion but, that was an hilarious remark right there xD

     

    Also, they sell SC4 in Origin? ._.

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    ^ Oh, yes.  Or give it away in some cases when people complain about SC 2013.  You get a structure something like Steam's and it has DRM features.  Better to get it from Amazon or GamersGate.

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    ^ Oh, yes.  Or give it away in some cases when people complain about SC 2013.  You get a structure something like Steam's and it has DRM features.  Better to get it from Amazon or GamersGate.

     

    Except Origin spies on you as part of it's policy, while Steam at least asks if you are willing to share the info with them.

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    <snip>

     

    Except Origin spies on you as part of it's policy, while Steam at least asks if you are willing to share the info with them.

     

    Not their fault if you didn't read the EULA.  I don't know that they can scan a Linux system or not.  I don't take those kinds of chances.

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    ^  Better to get it from Amazon or GamersGate....

     

    Unfortunately, and for obvious reasons he is no longer available on GamersGate, a shame!

     

    Even those who read the EULA should also read the privacy policy or rather the lack of it that afflicts those who incautiously agree to install this spy abomination that is the portal.

     

    http://www.ea.com/privacy-policy

     

    As for Mr. Wright, after the " resounding success " of the Lamp Ants ant_farm_revolution_photo1_tn.jpg  with "Stupid Fun Club" he now joined the team of those who say they are able to change the world in Syntertainment... need to say more!

     

    As regards the DRM  can be sure that if it was not Sony have abandoned the idea anyone never would see Microsoft back behind ... this is one of the wonders of having competition between manufacturers.
     
    Unfortunately for gamers entire production market wants to go as a cartel in the direction of replacing the products to services thus mislead consumers when says " Buy "  when should say " Rent ".

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    ^  Better to get it from Amazon or GamersGate....

     

    Unfortunately, and for obvious reasons he is no longer available on GamersGate, a shame!

     

    Even those who read the EULA should also read the privacy policy or rather the lack of it that afflicts those who incautiously corcordam installing this abomination spy who is the portal.

     

    http://www.ea.com/privacy-policy

     

    As for Mr. Wright, after the " resounding success " of the Lamp Ants ant_farm_revolution_photo1_tn.jpg  with "Stupid Fun Club" he now joined the team of those who say they are able to change the world in Syntertainment... need to say more!

     

    Wow... And he made the Simants game about 2 decades ago... I thought he would make a remake of that oldie... guess I was mistaken. Also, whats with the frog in the website... makes no sense because Will never got involved with anything other than ants, lawns, and sims...

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    Interesting that he says DRM is not a solution for a single player item if the only reason to use DRM is some policy or other.  (That's what I read into it, anyway).

     

    The folks at Origin (EA) will sell you SC4, but their DRM login and all that guff is included in the deal.  The horse left this barn in 2003 and only injections of free custom content have kept it pooping along.

     

    I had always wanted SC5 to be an expansion of SC4 with the ability to drive across city borders in UDI missions, even though my rational mind tells me that it won't ever be done.

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    There are these people that want you to push a franchise in a super hardcore direction, and therefore we're going to close it off to 95% of the players, 

     

    Is this a reference to the SimCity community?

    Even though it makes some sense as a business strategy don't forget that it was this appeal to the niches that made Mr. Wright a success back in the 80s and early 90s. The market situation may be somewhat similar, the Consumer, on the other hand, is not.

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    If it doesn't run on a smart phone, nobody is interested in making it.  The era of the PC game may seem to be over, but smart phones and their tiny screens will never replace the big PCs when it comes to actually doing some real work or playing a real game.

     

    Capabilities of these may grow in the future to include full PC capability, but it will be a long time before there is enough oomph in these tiny boxes to handle some of the serious applications that are out here.

     

    The smart phone craze will fade like Bobby Sox in the end.  All the current flap over privacy and the national spy agencies may induce some caution in the mob, but I seriously doubt it.

     

    The question now is what will replace those bulky smart phones?

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    Flyhigh, he also stated that: "But when it's something that's 5% representing the other 95 that will probably feel the same way, then I think it's really valuable" Referencing to us basicly.

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    Is this a reference to the SimCity community?

     

    Probably... if so, a rather poor observation. But from what I've seen/heard from Mr. Wright in recent years, he seems to be pretty much removed from the gaming world anyway, sorry...

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    If it doesn't run on a smart phone, nobody is interested in making it.  The era of the PC game may seem to be over, but smart phones and their tiny screens will never replace the big PCs when it comes to actually doing some real work or playing a real game.

     

    Capabilities of these may grow in the future to include full PC capability, but it will be a long time before there is enough oomph in these tiny boxes to handle some of the serious applications that are out here.

     

    The smart phone craze will fade like Bobby Sox in the end.  All the current flap over privacy and the national spy agencies may induce some caution in the mob, but I seriously doubt it.

     

    The question now is what will replace those bulky smart phones?

    Most of this is accurate except for the ( Being along time from now ) ( Intel is thinking a 64 core phone will be done from 10 to 15 year's from now. )

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    The number of cores won't matter if the app isn't written for it.  All you'll get is massive multiprogramming not multitasking.

     

    Apparently the next thing on the high-tech menu is the quantum-state computer.  In which case it may run your job sometime, or maybe not.

     

    I'd be more interested in a path-predictive multiple pipelined system with about 10 pipelines, associative memory, and full hardware security.  Nice special purpose processors for both decimal arithmetic (100 digits, floating point), and vector manipulation (1024 x 1024) interest me much more than a million little risc chips spinning their wheels ever so fast.  --  Uh, scratch the vector processor, it would die of overheat.

     

    I think a 64-core chip might make an interesting lab curiosity, but how on earth do they expect to package it in a phone? 

     

    I expect phones will be some kind of implant fairly soon.  Very hard to steal.  Every man a cyborg, probably from birth.  In which case, by the way, everyone will have a much faster parallel analog processor available.  Most of it is idle at the moment.

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    The number of cores won't matter if the app isn't written for it.  All you'll get is massive multiprogramming not multitasking.

     

    Apparently the next thing on the high-tech menu is the quantum-state computer.  In which case it may run your job sometime, or maybe not.

     

    I'd be more interested in a path-predictive multiple pipelined system with about 10 pipelines, associative memory, and full hardware security.  Nice special purpose processors for both decimal arithmetic (100 digits, floating point), and vector manipulation (1024 x 1024) interest me much more than a million little risc chips spinning their wheels ever so fast.  --  Uh, scratch the vector processor, it would die of overheat.

     

    I think a 64-core chip might make an interesting lab curiosity, but how on earth do they expect to package it in a phone? 

     

    I expect phones will be some kind of implant fairly soon.  Very hard to steal.  Every man a cyborg, probably from birth.  In which case, by the way, everyone will have a much faster parallel analog processor available.  Most of it is idle at the moment.

    I almost said something about quantum computing :)

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    If it doesn't run on a smart phone, nobody is interested in making it.  The era of the PC game may seem to be over, but smart phones and their tiny screens will never replace the big PCs when it comes to actually doing some real work or playing a real game.

     

    Capabilities of these may grow in the future to include full PC capability, but it will be a long time before there is enough oomph in these tiny boxes to handle some of the serious applications that are out here.

     

    The smart phone craze will fade like Bobby Sox in the end.  All the current flap over privacy and the national spy agencies may induce some caution in the mob, but I seriously doubt it.

     

    The question now is what will replace those bulky smart phones?

    The PC will never truly end until neurological implants that turn your eyes into living screens are invented... I hope that day never comes.

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