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UDR Chernostrovia

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Ceraton

Welcome + A Brief History

Hello, everyone. Welcome to a brand new CJ of mine. This journal is going to take place in the United Democratic Republic of Chernostrovia, located in the northern Black Sea.

 

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The name Chernostrovia comes from a portmanteau of the words "cherno" and "ostrov", which mean "black" and "island" in Russian respectively, thus can be translated as Black Island.

 

Chernostrovia was a part of the Soviet Union from 1917 to 1991 as the Chernostrovian SSR. In 1941, German and Romanian forces captured the island within one month during the Axis invasion of the USSR, incorporating it into Romania. In late 1944, the Red Army retook the island and reincorporated it into the Soviet Union. From 1945 to 1991, Chernostrovia was one of the prime tourist destinations of the Soviet Union due to the many long beaches on the island. In 1991, the Chernostrovian SSR broke away from the Soviet Union and became the United Democratic Republic of Chernostrovia.

The Supreme Soviet of Chernostrovia passed the 1992 Constitution which held that the Communist Party would remain as the state party and the only party eligible to hold seats in the Supreme Soviet, but that other parties and groupings would be able to exist on an unofficial basis. The Communist Party of Chernostrovia held a new party congress where the party adopted the policy of New Socialism for a New Age, which held that a number of state-owned enterprises were to be made private enterprises and that a market economy was to be introduced, but that the social protections would continue to exist. 

The new policies resulted in massive privatizations and a very steep rise in wealth inequality, and the country saw a drop in population and life expectancy much like other ex-Soviet countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The legalization of other political groupings resulted in the formation of several new parties, some based on liberalism and nationalism while others based on Marxism which oppose the "New Socialism" policy of the Communist Party.

 

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The Supreme Soviet of Chernostrovia is located in the city center of Ravningorod, the capital of Chernostrovia. The Supreme Soviet holds 45 seats, all of which are held by the Communist Party. Most of the leadership of the Communist Party is intellectuals, investors and CEOs, who likewise make up a large portion of the overall party membership. From the 1920s to the 1950s, the membership of the Communist Party was overwhelmingly factory workers, university students and farmers, which was largely the result of the Lenin Enrollment in the 1920s, when the Soviet Communist Party sought to bring more workers into leadership positions and less bureaucrats. In the 1950s and 1960s, this policy was reversed as the Communist Party demoted workers from leadership positions and replaced them with managers and bureaucrats. Now, with the onset of "New Socialism" and the market economy, there is very little worker representation in the party. 

The newly-formed Liberal Democratic Party has argued that this is a failure of communism as a whole, and that the Communist Party should disband. The Workers' Party on the other hand, which is also newly-formed but is Marxist, has called for a new armed revolution to "reestablish proletarian dictatorship and end the toxic "New Socialism" concoctions of the Khrushchevite bureaucrat-capitalists". The Liberal Democratic Party is the second-largest party in the country, the largest being the Communist Party itself, while the Workers' Party is smaller but is the fastest-growing party in terms of membership.

 

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The Ministry of Foreign Affairs used to be the headquarters of the Marxism-Leninism Education Center when the Soviet Union still existed. In the 1990s, the building was made the Foreign Affairs ministry and the Marxism-Leninism Education Center was relocated to elsewhere in Ravningorod. The building has a large tribute to Che Guevara on one of its walls.

 

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The Heroes of 1941 Square, dedicated to the soldiers who briefly defended the city from the Wehrmacht during the Siege of Ravningorod in 1941, is where the Chernostrovian People's Army holds parades on special occasions. Dances, rallies, and other gatherings of Communist Party members are also held in the square. 

 

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The Kozlov Apartments used to be a state-owned housing compound until 2004. Since then, the apartments have been privately-owned and the residents are expected to pay large amounts in rent. The continuous increase in rent has unsurprisingly resulted in many workers moving out and many intellectuals and middle-class families moving in. 

 

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The Simbirsk Road Apartments, located on Simbirsk Road, have remained state-owned. The rent for residents here, however, has likewise increased, though not to the same degree as the privately-owned apartments. Apartments here have more modern water heaters and backup generators, which is not as often the case in privately-owned apartments. Room sizes are generally smaller in comparison to privately-owned apartments as these buildings were constructed to hold more residents. 

The rising costs of living in Ravningorod have led to workers crowding in older buildings on the outskirts of the city, which has meant the formation of what are essentially slums. Farmers and peasants in the countryside are likewise relocating to these slums as the kolkhozes (collective farms) have been gradually dismantled by the market economy and the state protections for farmers and their produce have effectively vanished. This has also contributed to the ever-increasing trade deficit and has crushed the Communist Party's empty promises of self-sufficiency and independent development. The Workers' Party has held rallies to protest the situation where many protesters have been injured by tear gas and rubber bullets from the police.

 

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Welcome to the Chernostrovian nation, and its uncertain future.

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