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About this City Journal

The Grand Duchy of Genevra is a small state in Western Europe and a preeminent and long-standing member of the Simcity Journal Union. A beautiful nation that showcases both historic splendor...

Entries in this City Journal

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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Still not much progress with the Wiki, I've been relying on a really crummy wireless connection here at school after inadvertently exceeding my bandwith limits by quite a bit. I've also been busy with finals week but that will be finishing up soon and I wanted to post an update to hold everyone over until I finally break for summer. Today's chapter is actually taking a step back from our previous expansion and returning to some areas of the capital city that remained unfinished; around Chapters V and VI, so some of this should be recognizable. The first image also takes another look at the rail line that snakes around Montereau, for those well versed in Genevran you geography you will know that Montereau lies in the Rhone River valley surrounded by densely forested, sloping hills (note the use of dedgren's new ploppable water as well as FARR puzzle pieces).

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In addition, the Grand Duchy would like to proudly announce that we were elected to be the 14th president of the SimCity Journal Union over the New Kingdom of Sierrastare by a margin of 16-2.

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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Still not much progress with the Wiki, however this chapter I would like to start off with a bit of a clarification. I think some are confused on the location of Genevra as well as the current conflict erupting with Cameroon, so here's a simple map:

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1: This is the location of the Genevran homeland in western Europe and the site of the capital of Montereau; the conflict with Cameroon does not and will likely not spread to affect the European motherland.

2: This is where the Genevran colony of  île de la Guinée is located in the Gulf of Guinea, just off the coast of Cameroon. This is where the current hostilities are occurring as well as the blockade of Douala.

Now onto the images themselves...in this update we return to the previous area shown in Chapter 12. Most importantly we see a frontal view of the Palais D'été, or the Summer Palace. Historically it served as the summer home of the Grand Duke in Montereau, surrounded by lush gardens and fountains. Today it is far more modest and serves the purpose of being the permanent residence of the Grand Duke. The gardens and ostentatious flair of the palace were largely removed in the mid-20th century as a means to further reduce to the Genevran absolute monarchy.

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The outbreak of hostilities in the Gulf of Guinea also found a spot on Fox News.com as nations around the world reacted to the blockade.

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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Today's chapter contains several important developments, including the first "Interlude", breaks in the showing of in-game pictures to progress the storyline of Genevra more fully. We will start with this Interlude, and the SC4 pictures will follow.

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Heavy fog blanketed the Dubois Strait, minute filtrations of moonlight tapering through the miasma. It is at this point in the Gulf of Guinea that the shores of île de la Guinée and Cameroon and closest, and it is at this point the Genevran naval patrols are most heavily concentrated. On that foggy night, April the 24th, 2009, captain of the GNS Balthazar Cesar Garnier commanded a portion of the West African Naval Fleet consisting of the Balthazar, an aircraft carrier, and two escorting guided missile cruisers, the GNS Monarchie and le Rhone. It was an ordinary night, a routine that captain Garnier had undergone more then a dozen times since arrive to the Gulf of Guinea nearly a month ago. However, the appearance of several blips on the bridge radar screen would change all that.

His senses heightened and his curiosity aroused, Garnier radioed his small contingent and ordered all personnel to be on high alert and altered his course to intercept the three ships steaming directly towards île de la Guinée in Genevran waters. When at least visual contact was reached, it was ascertained that these war vessels flew the flag of Cameroon. From there, the situation quickly escalated...

4:31 AM, Captain Garnier establishes radio contact with identified Cameroon warships, demands several times that the ships immediately leave Genevran waters on the course they entered. No response is received, and the vessels continue at full speed towards île de la Guinée.

4:35 AM, Distance between ships close, still no response has been elicited or change in action. Captain Garnier informs the Cameroonian command that several warning shots will be fired, if the demands are not met after those initial salvos the Genevrans will open fire in earnest.

4:37 AM, Several shots land harmlessly in the waters around the Cameroon vessels yet no effort is made at slowing or changing course, Captain Garnier decides to allow several more minutes for compliance. The result is disastrous, the Cameroon warships unexpectedly open fire. Without hesitation Garnier orders returning fire. The Genevrans instantly gain the upper hand.

4:45 AM, The Genevran ships make short work of the enemy, sinking two vessels and allowing one to escape badly damaged. In total, 44 Genevran sailors are killed and many Cameroonians are fished out of the water and taken prisoner.

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 The GNS Balthazar and its escorts of the West African Naval Fleet on patrol in the Dubois Strait.

 

The Grand Duke, who at the time of the hostilities was just about to enter into meetings with government officials in Seto, is shocked by the events and commends the sailors on handling the situation with military professionalism. A call is immediately made to Prime Minister Leutrim Wetter back in Genevra, who in a televised event before Parliament elucidates the nation on the travesty that has occurred. He informs the people that the Grand Duke has not yet declared a State of War, however all troops have been placed at maximum readiness.

Several hours later that same day, after engaging with talks with the supreme leaders of the armed forces by secure televised conference, the Grand Duke addressed his people from Seto in an internationally televised speech. He denounced the actions of the Cameroon forces, praised the professionalism by which his own troops conducted themselves, and offered condolences to his people who lost loved ones in the brutal attack. He assured the Genevran people that they were safe and stated that war had not been declared, however that a blockade of Cameroon's major port of Douala and an all around containment of the hostile nation would occur such to impose the will of Genevra and to support the territorial integrity of its borders.

 

MilitaryMap.jpgSatellite image with overlays showing the division between Genevran and Cameroonian territorial waters (10th Vertical) as well as the location of the hostilities and the impending blockade.

Cameroon President Paul Biya responded by decrying the destruction wrought by the Genevran navy, yet he declined to provide an explanation as to why three heavily armed vessels of the Cameroon navy were so close to the shores of île de la Guinée. At the time of his comments, he was not informed of the impending blockade and his response on that matter is yet to be determined, however he was adamant in stating that he did not want to see war erupt...

 


Now onto some less dire developments, continuing with the development of the capital city. An important new landmark shows a bit of itself in this chapter, however we shall leave it anonymous for the moment. In addition, we see some of the first "modern" signs in Montereau, namely the major A1 highway artery cutting through the city and running parallel to the Rhone River. It is a little ways beyond this highway that the major commercial city of Lafayette lies, but that's for another day.

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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So far there has been little doubt that Montereau is indeed a green city. The banks of the Rhone are draped with trees and boulevards and side streets alike are bathed in the shadows of foliage. However, if you've been watching closely it has also become apparent that open space is at a premium, and large open areas are usually cluttered with the hustle and bustle of commerce. Across the Rhone, though, with the long shadow of the Tour de Magne stretching over it is what is affectionately known as Point Vert, or the green dot. A large area of lush grass and foliage nestled among the crowded streets of Montereau, it is a welcomed retreat from city life. It is also the sight of a massive observation wheel that gives the most fantastic panoramic view of Montereau and neighboring Lafayette.

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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This chapter is an interesting montage of images, showcasing the Tour de Magne as well a handful of new landmarks. The first two are nowhere near the city of Montereau, but instead are located in the heart of the rolling hills and forests that encompass the capital city. The castle is the Château de Chaumont which was named in honor of a previously venerable member of the SCJU, the Empire of Chaumont. The castle dates back several centuries and was built as a retreat for the Genevran monarch. The stone monolith standing in front of the castle was located at the sight first and it is unknown who constructed the beautiful statue; it was named the Fidèle Garde, or Faithful Guard, as it was seen as a symbol of protection over the capital city. Back in the city itself, the structure adorned with a golden dome contains the two houses of Parliament; the House of Peers and the Lower House and is the nexus of government affairs.

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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Among the Genevrans and the French there is a saying; "la tour ou la tour?". Depending on which nation you find yourself in, the answer to which tower came first, "the tower or the tower?" will be startingly different. In France, the response is often haughty and curt; of course the Eiffel Tower came first. In Genevra, however, many will seek to persuade you with the eloquent language of a revisionist history that claims the Tour de Magne was constructed first. In reality the Genevra tower was built a couple of decades after the famous Eiffel Tower, though it was constructed in a very similar manner. Initially a mockery of the Eiffel Tower (which after the 1889 World's Fair was kept standing, despite being generally viewed as an ugly monument), the Genevran people came to enjoy their new tower much as the French had. Today, the Magne Tower is considered a Genevran oddity, though it is greatly overshadowed by the original pièce de résistance in France.

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Genevran WikiProject Progress

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[[Foreign & Domestic Economics :: Cities & Towns; Araphen, Lafayette]]

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[[Cities & Towns; Montereau]]


This chapter will introduce several more of Montereau's historic sites while leaving others still a mystery, we will address each in turn. First we see the Stade Rouge, the small copper roofed building flush against the Rhone. Now a famous theatre venue, in decades past "the Stade" has been a house of illrepute, deserted building and a bomb shelter. A block down from the opera house is la Gare de Grandeur, the largest rail terminus in the entire nation and the hub of all rail travel throughout Genevra, in addition to servicing large portions of the French borderlands. Once again, we also see the grand spire of an unknown tower casting shadows across the city, this time cutting through the rain and fog of a stormy day...

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Today I am introducing the Genevran WikiProject, which I will show at the beginning of each chapter detailing my current progress with the Genevrank wiki page on the SCJU wiki until said page is complete and containing all relevant information on Genevra.

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[[ Main Page :: Montereau :: History of Genevra; Antiquity, Middle Ages, Early Modern, Modern ]]


Considering I have not shown a map or given any detailed information on the geography of Genevra, you will be surprised to find that in this chapter you will be introduced to the Rhone River. This is the very same river that flows to the Mediterranean through the French cities of Lyon and Avignon, yet it is at its most pictureesque as it runs through the carefully constructed, tree-lined canals of Montereau. No longer a work horse of industry and travel, Genevra has transformed the Rhone into a work of art. In addition, we also see la Basilique de Saint Apôtre from a variety of angles (as Genevran engineers finally figured out how to overcome the prop limit on a lot 2.gif ) as well as a huge teaser that should be fairly obvious in the second image. Enjoy!

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This chapter continues to explore the everyday in the capital city as we finish up our look at the western periphery of the "old city" where it meets the suburbian fringes. The second image includes a glimpse of the back of the Catedrala da Gronda Spada as to place the entire area shown in context, the Trottier Metro from Chapter V also has a cameo in this update. And as March draws to a close, the April 2009 edition of Le Monarque has been released for your reading pleasure and it includes some vital stories on the political and diplomatic status of Genevra abroad.

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I also invite you to peruse the April 2009 edition of Le Monarque.

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Still continuing along the western periphery of Montereau we explore in greater detail the boundary where the old city meets the cramped suburbs. There are no stunning historical landmarks here, however there are a couple of quaint local sites that only the saviest and most knowledgeable tourist would recognize. The open subway station is the most notable, and is one of the few surviving relics of the original Montereau metro that was constructed decades ago. While all other stations throughout the city have been renovated and retrofitted to fit a more modern styling and function, the Métro de Trottier has been preserved in it original architecture. Such is the job of the Authority on Aesthetics, an arm of the Society for Historical Preservation of the government. Its job is to not only save and maintain the many historic buildings throughout Genevra, but also to influence current construction as to maintain the visual harmony of the nation.

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Well after a spot of trouble with la Basilique de Saint Apôtre (I've managed to reach the prop cap and so now I have to figure a way to divide the lot itself into two) we'll be moving towards the western periphery of Montereau, where the rather luxury suburbs collide with the old city. The transition is abrupt, with large buildings of the old city running right up to the cobblestone streets of the suburbs and casting shadows over the small, single-family dwellings. These houses are some of the nicest and most expensive in all of Genevra, however yards and outdoor spaces are nearly non-existent as the houses are packed tightly together. As a very small nation trying to produce a burgeoning population, no viable space in Genevra is left unused. At the same time, however, the nation struggles with maintaining the historic nature of its many cities as well as the existence of a comfortable suburbia. In addition, this chapter is ended with an overview of the entire area we've documented so far, showing the Place du Dieu Mars, la Basilique de Saint Apôtre and the Catedrala da Gronda Spada.

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We continue today getting even closer to revealing the full identity of that gorgeous domed structure that exists as the centerpiece of Montereau. While it will still only be partially shown, the building itself will be revealed as la Basilique de Saint Apôtre, or the Basilica of the Holy Apostle. To many, however, it is simply la Basilique. This wonderfully crafted piece of Genevran architecture lies at the geographic and spiritual heart of Montereau and the entire nation. The complex is religious in nature, acting as the nexus of the Sainte Église and the estate of the Archapostle, the surpeme religious leader of the Church. Constructed over more then a century, the building is considered to be the crown jewel of the Genevran state and was meant to be an imposing force of the Sainte Église. The inside is no less magnificent, and is decorated with countless works of art created by the masterful hands of some of the world's most famous artists. The following panoramic of Montrereau showcases the glorious dome that caps la Basilique.

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I also invite you to peruse the March 2009 edition of le Monarque, the monthly news publication of the Grand Duchy of Genevra:

[use the buttons at the top to navigate or simply enter a page number to jump directly to it]

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We continue our journey around the nexus of Montereau in which we encounter a few new landmarks as well as

revisit the Catedrala da Gronda Spada. We will only be focusing on one of those however, the Place du Dieu Mars, while the other two

will still remain shrouded in mystery. The large temple with the green copper roof is the Place du Dieu Mars, or Place of the God Mars,

but more commonly is referred to as the Temple of Mars. Constructed in antiquity (ca. 78 BC) by the Romans several decades after

their conquest of Gaul, the temple was meant to intimidate and subjugate the local Gaulish population to Roman rule. It stood without

incident up until the fall of the Roman Empire centuries later, when it was largely desecrated by the Pagan barbarian populations pushing

their way over the Roman borders. It would remain a relic of the past, butchered by salvaging and war. It would experience a rebirth, however,

when the ideals of the Italian Renaissance where transplanted into Genevra along with the founding of the Sainte Église. Under the Grand Duke

Lothair III's ambitious cultural agenda, the temple would be rebuilt in an attempt make a historical correlation between

the new Genevran state and the power of the ancient Romans.

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Montereau is the capital of Genevra and its existence as such can be traced back to the early Middle Ages.

It is one of the oldest and most culturally revered cities in all of Western Europe, with the earliest recorded settlement

being the Roman town of Montruvia. The entire city is considered to be a historical site by the Genevran government

and it remains unspoiled by modern construction and skyscrapers. This chapter focuses on three stunning images of

one of the cities crown jewels, the Catedrala da Gronda Spada, or Cathedral of the Great Sword. It was commissioned

in the mid 17th century to commemorate the first great victory of the Sainte Église, the state religion of Genevra and a

faith largely unique to the nation. Repelling papal armies in a religious war during the year of 1624, the Grand Duke Lothair III

was responsible for building the cathedral to commemorate both his victory and that of the

Genevran Church (History of Genevra, Section IV. Early Modern). The golden eagle adorning the

cathedral's entrance was added several centuries later  in the aftermath of World War II to

act as a beacon of hope and strength for the decimated Genevran people.

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Introduction

The Grand Duchy of Genevra is a small nation in Western Europe bordered by France and Savoy on four sides. Despite its size, the Grand Duchy has a deep connection with European history and can trace its roots back to the Roman conquests of Gaul. In addition to the fatherland in Europe, Genevra maintains an overseas colony in the Gulf of Guinea known as Île de la Guinée. Today Genevra is an active and vital member of the Simcity Journal Union, maintaining full membership.

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