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About this City Journal

Entries in this City Journal

bienefeldt

Where you now find a thriving city where people live and work in lush green surroundings - history shows us it has all been the effort of the determined inhabitants of Livonia wanting to create a better place for their children. Up till early 20th century there are was a deep forest of mostly birches. As World War II broke out the national-socialists moved part of the population of the Kaunas-Ghetto and concentration camp to this spot for forced labour in the quarries. This outpost of the Kovno concentration camp was demolished as Livonia was occupied by the Soviet Union in 1944. In the early 1970's soviet scientists and politicians made plans for the reconstruction of a nuclear powerplant supplying Kaliningrad and the Lithuanian SSR with cheap electricity from the 'peaceful atom' here and the city of Atomgorod was built. The nuclear powerplant however was never taken into service and after independence in 1993 completely dismantled. The official name of this modern city was changed to it's present form, named after one of the Rabbi's interned in the concentration camp, to honour memory of the jewish and other prisoners of the former concentration camp outpost.

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The national holocoustmuseum of Livonia

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Luxurious appartments with a view of the memorial pond in the district of Memoriaal

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A view of downtown R.-G.-Atoomstad with the peacepond.

bienefeldt

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Let us introduce to you, the new slogan of the Livonian touristboard for 2011.

Not only will you enjoy great holidays amongst friends here, but it was never easier to come to Livonia.

By bike, car, train, boat or plane: you are welcome.

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Aäron Lipschütz airport is the smaller of the Livonian Airports and located between the city of Rabbijn-Goldberg-Atoomstad and Vybow.

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Keep your passport and proof of insurance ready when travelling from Lithuania to Livonia.

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bienefeldt

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Welcome to Livonia, a little country on the Baltic shore located between Lithuania and the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad Oblast. Although very small, it's population of currently 300.000 is fiercely partriotic. Having gained independance only in 1993 all efforts of the government have been directed to improving economic conditions for the population. During this CJ I will keep you posted on current events in Livonia and it's capital Vybow; give you some background information on the history of this small territory and give some insiders tips for your citytrip.

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The white sign indicates a toll road. Avoid penalty tolls by registring before using it at the Department of Transport!

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Expressway 1 connects directly to the centre of Vybow. Here you see where the Ex1 starts in Rabbijn-Goldberg-Atoomstad.

Good news! The reconstructionproject of the national government is taking effect. Commuting between the Vybow (dutch: Vibouwen; german: Vibau) and Rabbijn-Goldberg-Atoomstad (formerly: Atomgorod) is getting easier every month. After the opening of the direct raillink the commuter tollraod is open now connecting direct with Vybow where a smooth transfer to the E273 makes travelling to Klaipeda (dutch/german: Memel) effortless. For using the Expressway you need to register at the Dept. of Transport to allow your creditcard to be charged. Alternatively you can use the E77 to get to Vybow (toll-free).

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Use the E77 to get from Rabbijn-Goldberg-Atoomstad to Vybow, if you cannot use the tollroads yet.

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As you can see, all signs are bilingual (Dutch/German). Approximately 63% of the population have dutch as their mother tongue, whereas 29% speak german as their first language. Till the beginning of the 20th century current Livonia was part of the German Empire, but with a strong flemish majority. The flemish were invited by the Prussian Kings to populate this stretch of the Baltic shores during the 16th and 17th century.

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