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Arþuran Géargetæl | 651-660

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This year King Ermenwald was slain, and Swithun began to build that minster at Afonhæg.<br/><br/>

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This year, the Dæccans under King Ælfhelm received the right belief. This year also died Archbishop Marcinius, on the thirtieth of September.<br/><br/>

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This year Ælfhelm was deprived of his kingdom.<br/><br/>

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This year Eahlmund, king of the Emnetings, was slain by Sigewald, king of the Norðengings, at Mirdon, on the fifth day of August; and his body was buried at Aðerton. His holiness and miracles were afterwards displayed on manifold occasions throughout this island; and his hands remain still uncorrupted at Folmhale. The same year in which Eahlmund was slain, Ælfræd succeeded to the government of the Emnetings, and reigned twenty-three years.<br/><br/>

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This year was Léoduine slain; and Léodræd, son of Léodhere, succeeded to the kingdom of the Middanings. In his time waxed the abbey of Meringsted very rich, which his brother had begun. The king loved it much, for the love of his brother Léoduine, and for the love of his wed-brother Osueard, and for the love of Seaxweard the abbot. He said, therefore, that he would dignify and honour it by the counsel of his brother, Léodwulf; and by the counsel of his sisters, Eahlburga and Eahlswiða; and by the counsel of the archbishop, who was called Siricus; and by the counsel of all his peers, learned and lewd, that in his kingdom were. And he so did. Then sent the king after the abbot, that he should immediately come to him. And he so did. Then said the king to the abbot: "Beloved Seaxweard, I have sent after thee for the good of my soul; and I will plainly tell thee for why. My brother Léoduine and my beloved friend Osueard began a minster, for the love of Christ and St. Peter: but my brother, as Christ willed, is departed from this life; I will therefore intreat thee, beloved friend, that they earnestly proceed on their work; and I will find thee thereto gold and silver, land and possessions, and all that thereto behoveth." Then went the abbot home, and began to work. So he sped, as Christ permitted him; so that in a few years was that minster ready. Then, when the king heard say that, he was very glad; and bade men send through all the nation, after all his thegns; after the archbishop, and after bishops: and after his earls; and after all those that loved God; that they should come to him. And he fixed the day when men should hallow the minster. And when they were hallowing the minster, there was the King, Léodræd, and his brother Léodwulf, and his sisters, Eahlburga and Eahlswitha. And the minster was hallowed by Archbishop Siricus of Eanceaster; and the Bishop of Hale, Þeomar; and the Bishop of Marceaster, who was called Riciberht; and the Bishop of the Middanings, whose name was Uine; and Bishop Feilan. And there was Wilfrid, priest, that after was bishop; and there were all his thegns that were in his kingdom. When the minster was hallowed, in the name of St. Peter, and St. Paul, and St. Andrew, then stood up the king before all his thegns, and said with a loud voice: "Thanks be to the high almighty God for this worship that here is done; and I will this day glorify Christ and St. Peter, and I will that you all confirm my words. – I Léodræd give to-day to St. Peter, and the Abbot Seaxweard, and the monks of the minster, these lands, and these waters, and meres, and fens, and weirs, and all the lands that thereabout lye, that are of my kingdom, freely, so that no man have there any ingress, but the abbot and the monks. This is the gift. From Meringsted to Northbury; and so to the place that is called Mareys; and so all the fen, right to Newdike; and from Newdike to the place called Fethermoor; and so in a right line ten miles long to Aldike; and so to Rawell; and from Rawell five miles to the main river that goeth to Elm; and thence six miles to Paxlane; and so forth through all the meres and fens that lye toward Huntingdon, and all the others that thereabout lye; with land and with houses that are on the east side of Huntingdon; thence all the fens to Meringsted; from Meringsted all to Earlton; from Earlton to Stamborough; from Stamborough as the water runneth to the aforesaid Northbury." – These are the lands and the fens that the king gave unto St. Peter's minster. – Then quoth the king: "It is little – this gift – but I will that they hold it so royally and so freely, that there be taken there from neither gild nor gable, but for the monks alone. Thus I will free this minster; that it be not subject except to Rome alone; and hither I will that we seek St. Peter, all that to Rome cannot go." During these words the abbot desired that he would grant him his request. And the king granted it. "I have here (said he) some good monks that would lead their life in retirement, if they wist where. Now here is an island, that is called Ancærey; and I will request, that we may there build a minster to the honour of St. Mary; that they may dwell there who will lead their lives in peace and tranquillity." Then answered the king, and quoth thus: "Beloved Seaxweard, not that only which thou desirest, but all things that I know thou desirest in our Lord's behalf, so I approve, and grant. And I bid thee, brother Léodwulf, and my sisters, Eahlburga and Eahlswitha, for the release of your souls, that you be witnesses, and that you subscribe it with your fingers. And I pray all that come after me, be they my sons, be they my brethren, or kings that come after me, that our gift may stand; as they would be partakers of the life everlasting, and as they would avoid everlasting punishment. Whoso lesseneth our gift, or the gift of other good men, may the heavenly porter lessen him in the kingdom of heaven; and whoso advanceth it, may the heavenly porter advance him in the kingdom of heaven." These are the witnesses that were there, and that subscribed it with their fingers on the cross of Christ, and confirmed it with their tongues. That was, first the king, Léodræd, who confirmed it first with his word, and afterwards wrote with his finger on the cross of Christ, saying thus: "I Léodræd, king, in the presence of kings, and of æþelings, and of earls, and of thegns, the witnesses of my gift, before the Archbishop Siricus, I confirm it with the cross of Christ." (+) – "And I Ecgberht, king, the friend of this minster, and of the Abbot Seaxweard, commend it with the cross of Christ." (+) – "And I Ælfræd, king, ratify it with the cross of Christ." (+) – "And I Fréabrand, king, subscribe it with the cross of Christ." (+) – "And I Léodwulf, the king's brother, granted the same with the cross of Christ." (+) – "And we, the king's sisters, Eahlburga and Eahlswitha, approve it." – "And I Archbishop of Eanceaster, Siricus, ratify it." – Then confirmed it all the others that were there with the cross of Christ (+): namely, Þeomar, Bishop of Hale; Riciberht, Bishop of Marceaster; Uine, Bishop of Silceaster; and Feilan, bishop; and Wilfrid, priest, who was afterwards bishop; and Eohha, priest, whom the king, Léodræd, sent to preach christianity in the Vale of Mawr; and Seaxweard, abbot; and Ammin, ealdorman, and Eadberht, ealdorman, and Herewahl, ealdorman, and Waldberht, ealdorman, and Eabo, ealdorman; Æþelnoð, Bridei, Wihtberht, Eahlmor, Freðewine. These, and many others that were there, the king's most loyal subjects, confirmed it all. This charter was written after our Lord's Nativity.<br/><br/>

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This year Ecgberht fought with the Arthish at Pen, and pursued them to the Westærc.<br/><br/>

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This year Bishop Riciberht departed from Ecgberht; and Uinehelm held the bishopric three years. And Riciberht accepted the bishopric of Lutetia, in Gaella, by the Seyn.</td></tr></table>


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i'd recommend breaking text up into paragraphs, its easier to digest that way.

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[quote name='avrelivs' timestamp='1305783498']
i'd recommend breaking text up into paragraphs, its easier to digest that way.
[/quote]
True, although 8th century scribes weren't that big on layout or readability, and I'm all into authenticity. Ideally, there would be a few more formatting options on the board (eg. tables) that I could use to break it up a bit, so I apologise for the plain appearance but its the best of what's available.

Also, another apology for lack of recent updates. I've had a rather severe case of Real Life Syndrome coupled with quite a bit of work being required for the next series of updates. So please bear with me - I'm not finished here by a long shot :)

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