Jump to content
Toothless Stitch

Did you know?

Recommended Posts

(to stay on topic :D )Did you know: The Tokkaido Shinkansen timetable currently features 442 train services a day (Nozomi/Hikari&Kodama)

@airman15 I think the traffic prognosis for the florida high speed route seems a little "high" 300 trains between the major centers plus local high speed traffic, this would be almost 350-400 trains a day in total, I guess..... A train count which almost starts to rival the biggest HSR of 'em all in a far less densley populated area rivalling with cheap plane tickets, far distance buses and a very cheap gas price. But hey, if it makes it, this would be a good surprise and a heavy slap into the face for the car-lobby conservatives.

If they're very creative they might also purchase differing rolling stock for the HSR routes for high speed an "local" traffic, the latter should be equipped similar to Southeastern's (GB) class 395.

Acela: I wouldn't try to compare operation to the japaneese as they basically operate on a different gauge and so to say completeley isolated. The NEC actually got a potential to be more likeley operated like the french or german hsr system, giving it a high capacity hich speed center line and spreading out via the conventional routes  to cities so far not connected to the network. I'm talking about extensions like hourly through services Boston-NYC-Norfolk and day trains as far as atlanta/charlotte in the south, Montreal/Springfield in the north. (Thoose day trains exist, but they're way too few!!)

(Btw I'm still hoping for a NYC-Philadelphia-Cleveland-Chichago HSR...)

Also ACELA patronage could be increased a lot by offering 2nd class choaches, the Business class only system pushes a lot of people to the regionals.....
 

 

 

Regional traffic: Railroad traffic on a local service base will always be a little slower than driving on a car in cities so spread out like the ones in the US. But it can be cheaper and more comfy! Ultimateley, it could also be made faster by finally using electric traction and up to date technology, I remember seing some vision of caltrain using doubledeck Alstom EMUs.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know: The only commercial operator of the Boeing 707 in the US is Omega Air Refuellers? They're a contractor which helps deliver fuel to jets flying within domestic airspace, mostly for training missions. The only civilian-spec 707 known to fly in the US is the Jett Clipper Ella, formerly operated by Qantas and owned by none other than the actor John Travolta.

@Skimbo- The 300 trains was for the California project. Keep in mind that many of the towns along the proposed line don't have airports that see a constant stream of arrivals and departures by airlines as they do say Sacramento or Burbank. Fresno is the largest among the central valley with four domestic and two international carriers, yet the same cannot be said for Madera, Stockton, or Modesto. Your next best options for the latter three would be bus lines or driving yourself. Regarding the Brightline, one of the aspects they're including is living and commercial space near each station. I'm sure in time the same will happen around CAHSR stations as people will spread along the line.

One of the major facets to the project will be choosing a maintenance facility and with one planned in Fresno, it will include a space for manufacturer's showcasing! It's possible that after the project will have different types of rolling stock; I just don't believe they will have anything other than a Siemens train for the very beginning with all of their requirements considered. One of the reasons why a line between los Angeles and Las Vegas was cancelled was because they wouldn't be able to introduce the Chinese rolling stock that was initially planned. Unless Alstom steps in and makes a proposal but they only have made announcements for the procurement of Acela's replacement called the Avelia Liberty.

I was speaking of that as a hypothetical situation. If it were true, it would mean a total overhaul of the rails themselves, the removal and replacement of the most at-risk and outdated bridges, and the implementation of better PTC just to name some of the challenges to face. They even have a train between Chicago and NY already; it's just one train a day and the total trip lasts about 19 hours using the P42 Genesis units. It would be amazing to see all of out major urban centers connected with HSR! It's just that the most-demanded lines should get priority construction or upgrades.

They awarded construction contracts to begin work on electrifying the Caltrain corridor back in July. The new units chosen will be based on ones by Stadler. One of the best parts about it is the trains will be running quietly. But I don't believe the will be rid of their diesel units but rather keep some in reserve. The total project for this section will cost $2B, but $1.25B will be going to the infrastructure for the rolling stock. They project that once this section is complete, trains will be running at ~130kmh which is about as fast as their current fastest can go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that the term "devil's advocate" originated from an actual official title/position within the Catholic Church, whereby the canon lawyer would act as an investigator and skeptic, to deliberately argue against a candidate's sainthood in order to uncover any possible misrepresentations or flaws which might prevent canonization?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know the first commercial airliner to break the sound barrier was a DC-8? The 4-engine airliner is designed to cruise comfortably at Mach 0.82. A test was held over Edwards AFB in 1961 to examine a plane's survivability at supersonic speed. In order to attain it, the plane had to be in a nose-down position and in this dive was reaching -500ft per second! In order to have enough altitude for the test, the pilots climbed to 52,000 which itself was a record! The plane did reach Mach 1.01 and held it for 16 seconds before recovering to level flight.

That same plane was operated by Canadian Pacific but is now scrapped about 20 years of service with them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know Southwest Airlines once flew the 727, the only type used by them other than the 737? They were leased during two periods in the 70's from Braniff airlines for no more than a total of five years. The type only saw a modified Desert Gold livery. The airline favors using one type even today; when they acquired the 717 from Airtran it was decided not to integrate them into the SW fleet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The oldest surviving set specifically built for a movie was that of the Paris Opera House, which was constructed for the 1925 Lon Chaney silent horror film The Phantom of the Opera.  It was the first set of its kind to be constructed with steel girders and concrete, due to the fact that it was required to accommodate such a great number of actors, extras, technicians and crew.  It existed on soundstage 28 on the Universal Studios lot until 2014, at which point it was removed for preservation and the soundstage was demolished.

POTO_set.png?raw=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know the most successfull track an field athlet of all times at the olympics is still Paavo Nurmi (Finnland)? 9x gold, 3x silver.

Second is Carl Lewis (USA), 9x gold, 1x silver.

Third is Usaint Bolt (Jamaika), 9x gold.

Nurmi, also known as the "Flying Finn" settled 24 world records in his career, two of them in 1924 in less than one hour, running the 1500m and shortly afterwards the 5000m.

Usaint Bolt settled 5 world records.

Carl Lewis, - sorry I'm not shure, but should also be around 5.

   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of the numerous Disney films that have been nominated for Best Animated Short Film, Donald Duck has starred in only one that has taken home the Academy Award , the1942 WWII propaganda film Der Fuehrer's Face.

MV5BMDE0N2UwZTctN2YyOS00ZmU1LWJkZGMtY2Yy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that despite a review in the Washington Post stating that it would "never be designated a film treasure by the Library of Congress," the 1993 comedy movie Groundhog Day was indeed selected by the National Film Preservation Board for such an honor in 2006?

customerservice-groundhog-day.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know, Leonardo Da Vinci's 'Mona Lisa' was stolen on August 21, 1911 from the Louvre and stayed missed for more than two years?

The theft, Vincenzo Perugia, was an italian museum guard and a patriot convinced he has to bring 'Mona Lisa' back home. So for two years the Mona Lisa first stayed in a small apartment in Paris, never offered to art dealers or collectors. Then Perugia traveled to Florence with his famous lady and offered her to the director of the 'Uffizi', the famous art museum of Florence. Director Giovanni Poggi took the man serious, met him at his hotel room, shaking hands, playing the backslapper. And Perugia handed the painting out to Poggi without any money in return.

It's told when he was arrested by italian police men shortly afterwards Perugia was totally surprised as he - maybe - have thought to become some kind of national hero.

It's also told that Perugias depravation had great influence on making the Mona Lisa the most famous painting of the world. As the return of the Mona  Lisa back to Paris became a big event with 100.000 spectators on the streets and newspaper reporting all around the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that the longest amount of time a criminal has spent on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List has been 32 years, and that the shortest span of time a criminal has been listed has been a mere two hours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know - the average distance between european villages is 20 kilometers. The reason: after 20 kilometer horses became tired. To build up high speed routes in the middle ages there were needed stables every 20 kilometers to exchange horses. Soon those stables were extended with taverns. those taverns needed supplies. And so on. So around those stables villages began to grow. So horses gave the distance between european villages.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that the play The Mousetrap, written by British murder mystery author Agatha Christie, is the longest running play in history, having originally opened in the West End in 1952 and continuing to this day?  Christie herself was not optimistic about the piece's longevity once it had opened, surmising that it would only run eight months.

tumblr_mih9bbW1MR1s5cstto1_1280.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, madhatter106 said:

Did you know that during the year 1968, there were a total of four mysterious disappearances and losses of submarines?  Those lost were the USS Scorpion, the Soviet K-129, the Israeli Dakar, and the French Minerve.

Did you know there is another facet to the wreck of the USS Scorpion? The search and discovery of the wreck was a classified operation which Dr. Robert Ballard was tasked on behalf of the Navy. The search efforts were done under the guise of searching for Titanic as an unofficial cover to finding the Scorpion, as well as the USS Thresher. The Navy only wanted to know the condition of each sub's reactor and only allowed Dr Ballard to continue on with Titanic if he was able to meet their request with time to spare. He was able to finish the assessments of each sub with 12 days to spare, at the end of which came one of the most legendary discoveries of the 20th century!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did indeed know that!  I had been listening to a lecture in which Ballard described the visits to the Scorpion and the Thresher, but didn't realize that 1968 (the year the Scorpion was lost) also had three other submarines disappear.

Did you know that Academy Award-winning actor Rod Steiger portrayed fascist leader Benito Mussolini twice, the first time in the Italian film Last Days of Mussolini and the second time in Lion in the Desert?  This second film was funded by the Libyan government under Muammar Gaddafi, and was banned in Italy a year after it was released.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know - living forever is not a myth?

As they couldn't state how long hydras (a small fresh water animal) live, scientists observed them for 4 years and couldn't find any sign they are aging. Most probably for them 'natural death' doesn't exist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that there were two historical persons with the name of Jefferson Davis during the American Civil War, one for each side?

The more prominent one, Jefferson Finis Davis, served as a United States senator and former Secretary of War under Franklin Pierce before becoming the president of the Confederacy.  The other, Jefferson Columbus Davis, was a Union major general who served with Sherman during his infamous March to the Sea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you known that a Jefferson Davis Hardy was a Black Tiger pilot on "Star Blazers," the U.S.-localized version of the classic anime "Space Battleship Yamato"?  The original character Yamamoto Akira was not only renamed, but given a U.S. Southern accent that would have made both William Jefferson Clinton and Jefferson Beauregard Sessions proud.

Who would have thought that States' Rights and the War of Northern Aggression would dovetail into a Japanese postwar revisionist cartoon's space fighter pilot with an awesome shock of anime hair and a drawl?

4vBAQyS.png

Yamamoto/Hardy's ultimate kamikaze scene was originally considered far too inappropriate for general U.S. broadcast television in 1979, and the final impact saluting the dangerously foreign wartime values of a former enemy were specifically edited out for the sake of American children.  However, we knew all too well what had happened...

95549ab0b5193984046c82edb540d7f7.jpg

Jeffuuusun Daaavis Haaardy...BANZAI!

...

The latest remake of the anime has reimagined the heroic character American viewers first knew has Jefferson Davis Hardy into...ahem...

page-29119.jpg

Maybe if she was the President of the Confederate States leading the glorious fight for The Cause, the North's Army of the Potomac might have surrendered en masse without firing a shot.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that acting icon James Dean was the first actor to be posthumously nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in 1955, for his performance in East of Eden?  He did not, however, win the award, and thus did not set a record for an Oscar for Best Actor win after death.  That distinction would go to Peter Finch, for his unforgettable performance as Howard Beale in the film Network in 1976.

2015-12-181-620x412.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know - the word 'love' is a branch of the word leaves?

In the early centuries, when after a hard long winter the farmes let their lifestock out in spring, they jumped in joy and hurried up to pick up the first sprouts from bushes and trees.

In this time the word leaves was spelled more like 'louvves'.

An this behaviour of cows, beeing so happy and joyfull, the farmers gave a name - they called the livestock to be 'louvig' - in the sense of beeing gay for the first sprouts of spring. And later more generally: beeing happy about springtime has come.

From this ' being gay for leaves' or 'being happy about springtime' as an adverb for animals behaviour roundabout between 1200  and 1400 the word more and more was applied on humans having some affection for a member of the other gender.

 

The latin word is 'amor' - so you see it is different, this word has no latin origin and the worlds most famous word has traces much older than the latin language.

But the traces leads to the short relationship between old lifestock and young leaves in springtime.

And that's all about true love and songs under balconies and diamond rings.

Mooh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that the first creature from Earth to give birth in space was a cockroach named Nadezdha, who was housed in a sealed container aboard the Russian spacecraft Foton-M No. 3 in September of 2007?  The cockroach gave birth to 33 offspring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know during the Cold War, the Soviets were able to reproduce a near perfect replica of the AIM-9 Sidewinder? During a skirmish between Taiwanese and PLAAF aircraft in China (c. 1957), an AIM-9 was launched at a Chinese target but instead of detonating as it were supposed to, the missile got lodged in the exhaust. The Chinese pilot returned to base with the missile and on his arrival the Soviets quickly took the missile to reverse engineer it. In doing so, the Soviets could use the air-to-air as a learning model and produce their own.

What's interesting is later when the US got an example of this replica (known now as the AA-2 or K-13), it was determined almost every part was interchangeable allowing either missile to trade components and still function.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know, in 2013 dutch sculptor Robert Driessen confessed to have adulterated more than 1300 Giacometti sculptures, which is remarkable as Giacometti himself made only 500. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know ... the most momentous Cyclone in mankinds history was the Bhola cyclone. In 1970 he hit East Pakistan (Pakistan Federation) wiping out entire villages, killing estimated 500.000 people and devasting great parts of East Pakistan's farmland. Pakistan gouvernement misjudged the magnitude of the desaster, disputed with help organisations, refusing help from India and sending only few vessels in the first days. Unrest arose in the affected areas which lead to the Bangladesh liberation war and to Bangladesh genocide (possibly up to 3 million people killed, systematic 'genocidal' rape of estimated 400.000 women, 30 million displaced people) which triggerd the concert for Bangladesh in Madison Square Garden 1971 (featuring George Harrison, Ravi Shankar, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton) and the region to become a hot spot of cold war where US and Russia sent troups to (basically the same as Syria today) which lead to the indo-pakistan war. All the shed of blood that had begun with the terrible cyclone ended four years later when Pakistan recognized that Eastern Pakistan had become a new nation: Bangladesh.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know that a 2016 study determined that in approximately half the coup d'états surveyed, an autocratic regime was replaced by another one, resulting in a much higher level of oppression than the time leading up to the prior regime's downfall?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you know ...

... UrbanChaos, urbancreator, Urban_Shadow and UrbanLight, urban_atmosphere, urbanfog, urbanlife (urbanbee, Urbanrats, urbanseabear), UrbanGuy and UrbanChick, UrbanSoul, Urbanhunter, Urbanization, urbanculture and UrbanLegend (UrbanDragon, urbanKnight and UrbanPrince), UrbanExplorer and urbancartographer like UrbanEconomist and urbanaut - they are all inactive members of the Simtropolis community?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an Account  

Sign up to join our friendly community. It's easy!  :thumb:

Register a New Account

Sign In  

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×