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Easy Bakes

Interesting Science Stuff Thread

1,168 posts in this topic

Neat.  Are they sure it has stars in it, or is it just a huge black hole masked by the dark matter?

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Originally posted by: A Nonny Moose

Neat.  Are they sure it has stars in it, or is it just a huge black hole masked by the dark matter?

quote>

im sure there are stars just hidden from view by the dark matter.

Latest Pics of Europa-on of the larger moons of Jupiter.

picture a little warped from resizing, it was huge.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1101/europa_galileo_1200.jpg

europa_galileo_1200.jpg

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Getting some really good shots of Europa.  I wonder if that is all ice?

News last night was full of the new solar system with six earh-sized planets.  The new NASA telescope is really paying dividends.  I gather from the report that they have discovered over 1,000 planets in about a year since that instrument was placed in orbit, and it only looks at a small part of the sky.

We are not alone.

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Most experts think the whole surface is ice, and the dark lines are canyon deep cracks filled with darker rock or dust covered ice.

no we are not alone, at least the number of planets is more then we thought.

wonder why they didnt start with the closest stars to us.

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On the main sequence, is there any point in looking at O,B,A, or F stars?  These are all too hot.  And K,M,R,N and S are rather stars that have passed their prime.  A type F star might have a goldilocks region, but it will be a long way out.

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okay if the asteriod Apophis did come close to earth is there a way to get rid of it other than blowing missles at it? Like making a satellite nudge its patha nd if we do nudge it and it hits another planet then what, or what if it hits the sun!!??

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Originally posted by: Munchiez

okay if the asteriod Apophis did come close to earth is there a way to get rid of it other than blowing missles at it? Like making a satellite nudge its patha nd if we do nudge it and it hits another planet then what, or what if it hits the sun!!??quote>

the whole earth could impact the sun and barely make a ripple.

the Sun contains about 99.999999% of all the mass in the solar system.

as for moving asteroids the only thing we could possible do would be to  some how attach some kind of rocket to it to adjust its orbit. mabey two or 3 solid rocket boosters would be enough.

blowing it to bits would also require landing on it to place high explosives and O2 Inside the asteroid to provide

enough concusive force to break it up. Nukes have no concussive force with no air.

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Blowing up an NEO will only produce a shower of smaller fragments which could be just as destructive in collistion with the earth. 

The best trick is to use gravity, somehow, to shift the orbit enough to assure a permanent miss of the upcoming keyhole.  If a large enough controllable mass were brought near the Egyptian god of destruction, he will give us a miss due to attraction.  I saw something recently that suggests NASA has this one up its sleeve.

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Originally posted by: A Nonny Moose

Blowing up an NEO will only produce a shower of smaller fragments which could be just as destructive in collistion with the earth. 

The best trick is to use gravity, somehow, to shift the orbit enough to assure a permanent miss of the upcoming keyhole.  If a large enough controllable mass were brought near the Egyptian god of destruction, he will give us a miss due to attraction.  I saw something recently that suggests NASA has this one up its sleeve.

quote>

the point of blowing it up would be to create smaller frgaments which would hopefully be small enough

to burn up in the atmosphere before impact and would cause those peices to move on different orbits. Problem is thet you would never be sure exploding it would not just make a 2 or 3 big peices. Aphosis is 1100 feet long not sure how small and object would have to be to compleatly burn up in the atmosphere.Im sure the objects composition and angle of entry are big factors on what happens to it.

 

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Two nuclear warheads, then? One thermonuclear bunker buster to rip the thing apart, followed by a regular nuke to scatter the fragments? It's not ideal, I know, and the shower of smaller fragments would still be a bad (and radioactive) thing to be hit by, but if the option is to be annihilated by a bigger rock within few days, I'd rather ask them to use the missiles.

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Originally posted by: Cobraroll

Two nuclear warheads, then? One thermonuclear bunker buster to rip the thing apart, followed by a regular nuke to scatter the fragments? It's not ideal, I know, and the shower of smaller fragments would still be a bad (and radioactive) thing to be hit by, but if the option is to be annihilated by a bigger rock within few days, I'd rather ask them to use the missiles.quote>

A nuke does not work in space that way.

the shock wave only occurs in an atmosphere.

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Why is it when something like this comes along, the first reaction is to try and blow it up.  Explosions have a lot of debris, and it is debris we are trying to stop, so why make more in an uncontrolled fashion?  This is an unthoughtout reaction to a danger.

Apophis is many tonnes of rock.  No nuke we have ever put together will have much effect on it except maybe to make it into a few unmanageable and therefore more dangerous pieces with unknown orbits.  Explosives, even nuclear ones, depend on expanding gases.  Quickly dissipated in space, and therefore ineffective.

We can either push this rock or pull it, but you can't destroy it without controlled antimatter.  CERN's LHC is a long way from encapulating any that they have made so far.  The half-life of that stuff is probably measured in petaseconds.

So, having disposed of explosions, let's concentrate on space tugs.  We'll need to devise them soon.  It wouldn't take much of a nudge to change the orbit if it were done at the correct moment.  With any luck, we could get rid of it forever by dropping it into the sun.  I am sure rocks like that fall into the sun all lthe time.

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I mean that would be good to push it into the suna dn get rid of it forever. The government should pay more attention to conserving the human race rather than worrying if their millions spent on wastes are still being wasted, I have governments.

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Is anyone else following the paleontology series on the National Geographic Channel? There have been huge finds in China of a dinosaur graveyard, and lots of interesting fossils. Work is being done these days using fancy gear to try and determine what colors dinos were. Skin fossils have been found, and some of the DNA is intact.

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Is anyone else following the paleontology series on the National Geographic Channel? There have been huge finds in China of a dinosaur graveyard, and lots of interesting fossils. Work is being done these days using fancy gear to try and determine what colors dinos were. Skin fossils have been found, and some of the DNA is intact.

they are saying some of them had feathers.in fossil time zones long before they thought there were feathers.

Fire tornado in Hungary

fire-tornado-hungary-2011_32888_600x450.jpg

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they are saying some of them had feathers.in fossil time zones long before they thought there were feathers.

Yes, and the NG channel had a show last night on archaeological finds that put people in North America before the ones supposed to have crossed the land bridge at the end of the ice age. Seems that 1,000 years prior to that, there was a west coastal migration along the edge of the ice sheets that reached as far as the southern tip of South America. DNA studies have linked this all up with modern descendants.

The archeology model of Bering Strait migration into North America that was so neat, seems to have a few loose threads along the edges. Well, that's scientific method for you.

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Yes, and the NG channel had a show last night on archaeological finds that put people in North America before the ones supposed to have crossed the land bridge at the end of the ice age. Seems that 1,000 years prior to that, there was a west coastal migration along the edge of the ice sheets that reached as far as the southern tip of South America. DNA studies have linked this all up with modern descendants.

The archeology model of Bering Strait migration into North America that was so neat, seems to have a few loose threads along the edges. Well, that's scientific method for you.

it was an easy model to go with.An easier migration model to explain Asian descendants in the Americas then them surviving crossing the pacific in rafts with enough people to create a viable population.They just walked.

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Well Occam's razor still applies. They apparently came down the coastal ice sheet in canoes, stopping here and there. Since they didn't have to deal with all the tough terrain, it was easier and they got farther.

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Just out of curiosity, what are some of our thoughts on string theory? Physics or philosophy?


  Edited by Mayor Defacto

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Just out of curiosity, what are some of our thoughts on string theory? Physics or philosophy?

String theory: very hard to verify. Maybe with the LHC. Geting up to .999c isn't possible with anything other than particles at the moment.

Physics, enclosed by mathematics, encloses most other sciences. I say most, because there are some para-physical studies of a sort.

Philosophy: The study of knowledge in general with lots and lots of departments. My son is a philosophy grad. He then went and got a qualification in the physical sciences so he could get a job. Phil degrees are a wonderful spring board to some other discipline, you definitely learn how to think.

I believe in Newton, Einstein, and the subtlety of nature. Mr. Schroedinger hasn't unboxed his cat as far as I am concerned. Nature doesn't play at dice.

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Just read in Time Magazine: apparantly the Technological Singularity is coming in 2045. How about that! Buncha nuts, is what I think. I recognize the power of computers, but I somehow still believe enough in a human soul to posit that even the most powerful computer would never be capable of thinking on its own.

Of course, I may be wrong. I'll certainly live long enough to see that date come and go, and what it shall bring, I do not know...

- Yonk

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New land for America.

Something good about the ring of fire, I suppose.

but how long before that lava field is able to support plants and such.

Geologically speaking, almost at once, once it cools. A little wind erosion to make a kind of soil, and voilà, plants! Nature is very persistent and very frugal. Dust on concrete will grow grass, given a few seeds and some moisture.

Chronologically speaking, about a year or so. Maybe sooner for some bacteria and lichens.

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Coldest Star found. No warmer then a cup of coffee.

Called a star only due to it size?

http://news.national...-space-science/

I don't think brown "stars" are on the main sequence (OBAFGKMRNS). They must be the oddest thing, sort of like a bigger Jupiter. Since it is a binary system and it is large enough to be paired with another star, I suppose it can be called a star, but that depends on the audience reaction.

Seriously, I always believed fusion operations were required to define a star unless it was a black hole (type S). By the way, did you know the mnemonic for the main sequence? It is Oh, Be A Fine Girl, Kiss Me Right Now, Sweetie.


  Edited by A Nonny Moose

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Mining Mercury would be a task for some very good robots that could stand extreme temperatures. Maybe they could stick to the terminator zone, but otherwise the insolation or lack thereof produces extremes.

If some kind of interplanetary supply chain could be put in place there, it might be profitable, but I wouldn't bet on it with current technology.


  Edited by A Nonny Moose

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A new mineral found from a meteorite in Antarctica.

Fascinating. A Titanium Sulfide crystal with a new structure. The article was a little light on properties, but since they were using scanning electron microscopes we are perhaps a little premature to know more. Wonder if this stuff is formed in the sulfur-rich vents on the floor of the Pacific where the pressure is several hundreds atmospheres?

There are unmanned vehicles that have been down there, but I have no report on any mineral samples. I think they were more interested in the wild life.

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