Jump to content
Easy Bakes

Interesting Science Stuff Thread

Recommended Posts

Thought we needed a place to discuss interesting science things.

Ill go 1st.
Taken by the Venus Express Spacecraft over the southern polar region of venus.The below image sequence taken in infrared light and digitally compressed, darker areas correspond to higher temperatures and hence lower regions of Venus' atmosphere. Looks very similar to the one that exists on Saturn.

southernvortex_venusexpress_big.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: blade2k5

A new Earth-like planet found 20.5 light years away, 100% chance of life possible so scientists say...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/earth-like-exoplanet-possibly-habitable-100929.html

A tour of the Gliese-581 solar system tour...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/gliese-581-star-system-tour-100929.html

quote>

Interesting they would think  a tidally locked  planet would be  almost 100% chance of harboring life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: blade2k5

A new Earth-like planet found 20.5 light years away, 100% chance of life possible so scientists say...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/earth-like-exoplanet-possibly-habitable-100929.html

A tour of the Gliese-581 solar system tour...

http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/gliese-581-star-system-tour-100929.html

quote>

A planet in the Goldilocks zone.  Maybe we really are not alone, as predicted.

Originally posted by: joshriddle

I'm doing a science project on plants for school. Nothing must of interest yes.

Identifying flowering plants..... etc...........

But this is one that I likey.

Linkquote>

That appears to be a black hole and its event horizon.  Hope it is a long, long way off.

Now that we've talked about the infinite, what about the very small.  What do we know about any practical application of Fullerenes, of which the Bucky Ball was only the first?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: Easy Bakes

More news from Voyager 1 launched in 1977.

It has now reached the end of the solar winds at the edge of our solar system.

http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/news/breakingorbit/2010/12/voyager-1-news-solar-wind-zero.htmlquote>

Read about this a week or so ago.  A man-made object now flying through interstellar space.  Cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish we could get Voyager back.  It contains our location, and who knows who will encounter it.  The people at NASA let their altruism get the better of them, I think.

Anyway, with all the communication stuff on-board, if they met some real aliens they won't understand any of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: A Nonny Moose

I wish we could get Voyager back.  It contains our location, and who knows who will encounter it.  The people at NASA let their altruism get the better of them, I think.

Anyway, with all the communication stuff on-board, if they met some real aliens they won't understand any of it.

quote>

Well, if some aliens just happen to fly past the probe (which, given the speed and size of it, relative to the size of anywhere in outer space, is quite unlikely), and manage to stop it (again, the speed it travels at gives it significant momentum, which would take some energy to slow down) and read the plaque, they're probably so advanced that they can check any nearby solar systems for Goldilocks planets in a matter of minutes anyway. They will most likely have done that long before they encounter Voyager, as a ship going between the stars would either be an explorer ship (and search for planets as a part of their daily routine) or use an already mapped route (in which case the map makers would have found Earth looong ago).

Anyway, by the time somebody finds Voyager, picks it up and learns from it where to find humans, we've probably:

a) gone extinct

b) made ourselves so glaringly obvious that finding Voyager is more of a curiosity than finding the humans ourselves.

c) evolved so far on the technical side of things that it's actually humans (or our descendants) who find it.

Throughout history, we've sent a lot of radio and laser signals out in space, and quite a lot of it contains easy-to-understand messages on where to find us. That is a million times more likely to give away our location than a small "satelite" we sent in a random direction.

No, I believe that the final fate of Voyager is unnoticed destruction. It will either burn up in something's atmosphere, crash into something big without making a sound (other than through the medium in which it crashes), or be hit by some object with a size ranging between "pebble" and "basket ball", and be smashed to smithereens. Voyager is a speck of dust in the wind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: CobrarollNo, I believe that the final fate of Voyager is unnoticed destruction. It will either burn up in something's atmosphere, crash into something big without making a sound (other than through the medium in which it crashes), or be hit by some object with a size ranging between "pebble" and "basket ball", and be smashed to smithereens. Voyager is a speck of dust in the wind.quote>

Surprised it didn't smash into anything going through the Keiper Belt and the the Oort Cloud.  Lot of rocks and frozen iceballs floating about out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^There are lots and lots of rocks there, that's for sure, but they are spread over a VERY large area. Most rocks are ten thousands of kilometres away from the next (if not millions), quite unlike what's being portrayed in the movies. If you go through a typical "asteriod belt", or even the rings of a planet like Saturn, the chance of even seeing a rock is way less than 50%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes but the Oort cloud is very big. While asteroid belts have very few asteroids in them the Oort cloud is big enough to have a bigger chance of colliding with something there.

Voyager may just drift for a very long time and finally be pulled towards something in millions of years. Whatever happens to it, it won't really affect us much though because its so small, contains so little information and is so far away it won't really alert anything to our existence or be important to us in the future.

It may be in some future museum case but thats it really.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^True. Still, I believe the density of the Oort cloud is so small that there's practically no chance of hitting anything on the way through it. Even though it spans almost a light year in thickness, there are relatively few objects there, considering the sheer size of the area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is some speculation now that some NEO that is not in the plane of the ecliptic could sneak up from an unexpected direction, sunward for example, and wipe us out.  It wouldn't surprise me in the least.  The NEO cataloging effort is so underfunded that by the time we found anything that might be trouble, it will be too late.  The latest rock they think might score a hit on us is Apophis.  According to a special on possible extinction events I saw recently, this one will give us a near miss soon, and if it gets the right gravitational kick will get us on the next pass in 2036.  We should be figuring out what to do about it before it is too late.

This rock is well named.  Apophis is the Egyptian god of destruction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure if there was some risk of Apophis hitting us Nasa would be doing something to deflect it. Even painting it would do the job. The sooner they got onto changing its orbit the easier it will be. A slight nudge now will have a huge effect over the next 20 years. Lets hope it doesn't get close then as I doubt we would do anything until it was too late. Nobody would be willing to pay up to deflect it until they realised it was definitely going to hit Earth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: Cobraroll

^There are lots and lots of rocks there, that's for sure, but they are spread over a VERY large area. Most rocks are ten thousands of kilometres away from the next (if not millions), quite unlike what's being portrayed in the movies. If you go through a typical "asteriod belt", or even the rings of a planet like Saturn, the chance of even seeing a rock is way less than 50%.quote>

I knew this already.2.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: Jamesrules90

I'm sure if there was some risk of Apophis hitting us Nasa would be doing something to deflect it. Even painting it would do the job. The sooner they got onto changing its orbit the easier it will be. A slight nudge now will have a huge effect over the next 20 years. Lets hope it doesn't get close then as I doubt we would do anything until it was too late. Nobody would be willing to pay up to deflect it until they realised it was definitely going to hit Earth.quote>

The problem is credibility and getting the funding.  NASA lately seems to be in the business of stopping things rather than starting them.  Put not your hope in guys who've been playing with World War 2 rockets for over 60 years.  All that money could have gone into alternate drive research.  People have said considerably more words since Newton's third law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fascinating.  They really do a good job with those false color images.

The sun is a close to an H-Bomb as I ever want to be.  1 AU is just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw a show on one of the PBS stations (I get four of them) about the building of London after the great fire in 1666.  Besides describing the engineering of the St. Paul's dome, which is quite snazzy, they went to the Royal Observatory at Greenwich to explain the time and co-ordinate system.  Since I was there in the 1970s, they have added a laser (green) that marks the prime meridian.  Wonder if it can be seen from space?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Originally posted by: blade2k5

Here's something rather interesting to read about our wonderous universe.  Astronomer discovers a giant green glob af gas six billion light years away....

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/net/20110110/capt.d9297d43741601d2bed3b13efb14aacf.jpeg?x=400&y=224&q=85&sig=SCun6xHb84LMtLkMhBiqIA--

quote>

Hmm Thats a link to a picture of an Arcology from another thread.

Was this  the story you were looking for?

Call Steve McQueen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an Account  

Sign up to join our friendly community. It's easy!  :thumb:

Register a New Account

Sign In  

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×