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    • Hehe, a mystery unfolds.  Further image investigation yields this larger fan art, used as an avatar by former twitter user 모자코힝 (aka "@mozacohi").  The twitter account no longer exists, but this is the largest full version of this drawing and it is the only one still showing the artist's signature "M. H. Kim."  Possibly it is fan art from an anime or manga, or maybe it is unspecified art inspired the style of anime or manga.  If someone recognizes the t-shirt graphic, we might be able to pin it to a character. As for the superblock, you might also draw inspiration from the historic Oglethorpe Plan for Savannah, Georgia, a city often acclaimed as among the most charmingly beautiful and picturesque in the U.S.  I admit I'm not really a fan of trying to find the perfect SimCity simulator block that can be endlessly repeated, as I like to see how things are interconnected and interrelated, and I'm a sucker for sightlines.  Part of Savannah's genius was not just to think of a superblock ward only as a discreet unit, but to think of a patterned layout of neighborhood squares that all interconnect with each other axially from square to square.  They may be automobile traffic flow nightmares, but the squares are beautiful and the center of civic and neighborhood life.  They are not where the utilitarian functional services go, but are the spaces and landmarks for the new democratic and egalitarian society in the Americas. Additionally, each ward was made up not of a single zone or density bounded within the street, but of a mix uses and sizes along different street scales such that instead of each block being residential or commercial, one side of the block could face a commercial street while the opposite side of the block faced a residential street, and in the middle of the block was an alley, where nobody cared if the backside of a business butted against the backside of an apartment complex.  The result is that the street pattern may be a grid, but it is a grid network of dense commercial streets, light commercial block, dense residential streets, or light residential street, rather than a grid pattern of dense commercial blocks, light commercial blocks, dense residential blocks, and light residential blocks.  A way I have heard it put is to think not of uniformly coloring zones within the bubbles of the blocks bounded by the streets, but to instead think of zoning along streets while letting the interior of the blocks fill in as they may.  This is the closest SimCity will allow us to mixed-use urban planning, which in many ways is the ideal planning for the grid block city.  The neighborhood identity becomes my street and the houses across the street facing my own, or my business and the businesses across the street facing my own, which is how most gird systems are experienced, and not an identity of who is on the residential block versus who is on the commercial block, which has more to do with assigning administrative addresses and utility block numbers and is not how people really see the places they live and work.  The streets that make up a superblock ward in Savannah come in a variety of types, from alleyways to narrow avenues to broad, tree-lined avenues, and their character becomes further elaborated based on which street is a commercial street versus which street is lined by rowhouses versus which streets have single-family houses.  
    • I made a short collector system to try and tackle major traffic congestion (solid red on traffic congestion view). The on/off ramps between the interchanges turned out pretty neat! Goes to show you to keep some right of way! Only minimal expropriation was needed (near the ramps to expand them) (I know the RHW tile below the overpass is messed up, I have since fixed that!)     Other shots:   The interchanges   Zoom out:
    • Most of the time, when I start somethin new, I start with a brilliant idear. And then I fail. Now there are two possibilites: I give up the whole thing or I dig deeper, starting with small experiments, simple geometries, learning. After a year or two, doing the more simple things, I gained the skill to try the first idear again. But mostly I forgot it or have lost interest. That's why old zen philosophers said: "the pathway itself is the target". For most people 'creativity' rises with skills. It's like a self-preservative system. You have an idear and try it and get skills and the new skills drives your idear. So it's all about the beginning. A german poet once wrote 'the biggest is to start'. Shure, one has to follow its own interests. Everybody has its own talents. But many people like me, they throw their talents away as they fail with their first brillant idear. It's a little bit sad. So talent isn't enough, if there is no passion and endurance. And then talent remains like an isle you dream of a lifetime to visit, but never touched its ground as you were afraid of the long journey to get there.